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Thread: Paint guns

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Jan 2019
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    21

    Default just don't go to HF

    Hey, you're at least speaking from some decent logic. Speaking of Harbor Freight, I'm still waiting for the guy to show up saying "Just get the HF purple gun they are great!" OMG! There is always one!

    Honestly I've watched spray guns on Ebay fairly closely for a while and you certainly can get a lot of your money back on a used one, so long as it is "popular" i.e. a Devilbiss or Iwata. Of course they may be posted for a very long time to find that right buyer...

    The speed of the FLG 5 is one of the things that has them calling to me. I hated the Finex because it was painfully slow. That is definitely something to consider for a beginner though. I learned on an old siphon feed with a 1.8 tip so I've been sprinting since day 1.

    I thought your tools analogy was decent but a snap on wrench won't tighten a bolt any better than a crafstman one -- that is where the analogy breaks down. The higher end gun is better in every way, period.

  2. #17

    Default

    The purple gun poke made me laugh.

    Agreed on the wrenches comparison, but maybe I should have named some tools with some moving parts. LOL

    If I did this for a living or considered myself a professional I am sure I would have a different outlook, maybe even a different perspective.

    But I have painted only a handful of cars and trucks over the years and they were spaced out just enough for me to have to re-learn things I forgot and the latest and greatest with the differing paints and primers.

    The first truck I ever painted with with a Binks Model #7. I painted a truck with it and for a first timer, no experience 20 year old, I thought it turned out rather well.

    My Pops used that same gun to spray oak cabinets and formica glue. Go figure.

    Scott

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
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    374

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jake_h View Post
    I've learned already at the ripe age of 32 that just buying good tools to start out is the only way to go.

    Get a $300 gun and don't like the hobby after 1 job? Sell it for $275...and remember how nice it was while it lasted.

    Otherwise you are continually dropping $100 more on things upgrading them incrementally. Over do it on day 1 I say! The price of the CAT, FLG4, FLG5, and even Iwata w400 makes them too good to pass up for a hobbyist.
    Yep, Len sells the Sagola 4600 here for about $450 (?), throw a $20 Ani regulator on it and if you used it once, then sold it on eBay for $250-$300??

    Compare that to the total cost of fillers, primers, DA sandpaper, cold beers, long and short blocks, wet/dry sandpaper, thinners, solvent W&G remover, water based W&G remover, mixing cups, hot pastrami sandwiches, base coat, clear coat, more sandpaper to fix the screw ups, more clear coat etc, etc, etc... It all adds up. That Sagola, Iwata, hell even a Sata 5500 (was supposed to be in my Christmas stocking!!!! even though I don't "need" one) all start looking a lot cheaper.

    Just make sure that you know how to and actually clean that gun!

  4. #19

    Default

    Sort of gets away from the original post but factors in.....

    Your last sentence of making sure 'you know how to clean that gun' is the very reason a used gun is a slow sell, unless you know someone who has the gun.

    I too watched a lot of guns on e-bay, craigslist, etc. etc. Most are in the 50%-60% of the cost of a new gun. Most hang around for quite some time.

    I can't offer up much experience on using the paint gun, and none of being a pro with a paint gun, but I do have a ton of experience in the search for a better gun for a novice.

    And used guns do not give me the warm fuzzies.

    I chose to save a few dollars on a gun with great reviews.

    If had years in the industry and my livelihood depended on my decision I am sure I would think differently.

    With that in mind the guns in the $450+ category were not a good fit for me.

    Scott

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    olympia,wa
    Posts
    553

    Default

    i wouldn't rule out a used gun. i bought a used sagola from len and it's perfect.
    and those hf guns have their place. i spray a ton of industrial coatings through them that i just couldn't bear to spray through a good gun. they only cost ten bucks which pretty much makes it not worth my time to clean it. a good painter can put a reasonable finish down with just about anything.
    i'd never use one for automotive top coats though because i want better than just "reasonable" results.
    b marler

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Posts
    21

    Talking

    Quote Originally Posted by bmarler View Post
    i wouldn't rule out a used gun. i bought a used sagola from len and it's perfect.
    and those hf guns have their place. i spray a ton of industrial coatings through them that i just couldn't bear to spray through a good gun. they only cost ten bucks which pretty much makes it not worth my time to clean it. a good painter can put a reasonable finish down with just about anything.
    i'd never use one for automotive top coats though because i want better than just "reasonable" results.
    There it is!

    Yeah, they have their place. Do they make one with a bigger tip? Seems like they'd be my go to polyester gun if I wanted to use it, but I only ever see a 1.4 tip. Northern has a 2.0 usually for not much more, and quite a bit nicer feeling.

    Regardless, I think most people will agree that the $150 to $200 range is the bread and butter range for a beginning hobbyist. This gets you into a lot nicer gun than the $15 to $100 guns (anyone have any luck with the Astros?) and won't break the bank.

    Anything more than that is probably overkill/diminishing returns until you get more experience...but if you decide you like the hobby then you will wish you started there. Worst case you keep the good $150 gun like a FLG4 or 5 around for enamels and sealers and get a nicer base/clear setup.

  7. #22

    Default

    Agreed.

    I have a bo-bo gun off ebay I use with a 2.0 tip. I am not sure the name brand but it has worked well for the epoxies and heavier primers for quite some time.

    There is a near here that uses the HF gun, not the purple one, but the $25 gun for his polyesters. He gets some time out of them and when they act up he trashes them. Pretty much the same thought process as stated above.

    The FLG 5 was in my price range and is more gun than I am painter. I feel like me being better than that gun is a long shot, odds are I will not paint enough/gain enough experience to eclipse what it can do.

    If that happens I can then upgrade, but for now I can't put the horse in front of the carriage. LOL

    Great exchange.

    Scott

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    olympia,wa
    Posts
    553

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jake_h View Post
    There it is!

    Yeah, they have their place. Do they make one with a bigger tip? Seems like they'd be my go to polyester gun if I wanted to use it, but I only ever see a 1.4 tip. Northern has a 2.0 usually for not much more, and quite a bit nicer feeling.

    Regardless, I think most people will agree that the $150 to $200 range is the bread and butter range for a beginning hobbyist. This gets you into a lot nicer gun than the $15 to $100 guns (anyone have any luck with the Astros?) and won't break the bank.

    Anything more than that is probably overkill/diminishing returns until you get more experience...but if you decide you like the hobby then you will wish you started there. Worst case you keep the good $150 gun like a FLG4 or 5 around for enamels and sealers and get a nicer base/clear setup.
    i know guts ream the tip on that 1.4 to make a bigger opening. i've never done it but i guess for 10 bucks i could experiment. i don't shoot poly primers, (or at least i haven't yet) so i haven't tried it. but for the industrial enamels the 1.4 is fine. for bigger stuff i still use my binks #7 with the two quart pressure pot. i'll have that thing till i die.
    i do however, need to pick up a gun for base. everyone seems to give that flg 5 good reviews, maybe i'll have a look. that would keep my sagola for clear and ss.

    on second thought, a different gun for base is probably what i'll do instead. i don't think the flg 5 is quite what i want.
    Last edited by bmarler; 02-14-2019 at 11:06 AM.
    b marler

  9. #24

    Default

    I'm no painter but I like my FLG-5.

    I may use the wrong terms but it puts out more volume/paint than my bobo gun.

    It took several swipes down an old door to adjust. I tried to dial it down some but even then it was more than what I had used.

    The fan "looks' twice as wide. Which was an adjustment in itself but made 50% overlap easier for me.

    I'm not sure what kind of review this makes, "Great gun that works for a guy that does not know what he is doing" may not be the best sales pitch but thus far I am happy with mine.

    Scott

  10. #25
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    38,889

    Default

    There are several variables when purchasing a spray gun, the biggest is price and like most tools "you get what you pay for".

    The better the gun the more expensive it usually is but there are some exceptions. If you want a top quality finish you'll probably spend over $400 and use good materials that are also high priced.

    Lower priced spray guns are good for those quick and cheap jobs and for spraying primer but it depends on the result you would like to achieve.

  11. #26
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    Denver, CO
    Posts
    475

    Default

    it always boggles me that you hear so much about what to spend on a spray gun... most spray guns will work great if these key directions are followed

    material to air set properly
    distance
    speed
    overlap
    viscosity / temperature of paint
    temp of substrate
    booth / garage temp
    clean air

    etc etc

    if you do not practice the above you might as well buy the cheapest gun possible

  12. #27
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Posts
    374

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by PainterDave View Post
    it always boggles me that you hear so much about what to spend on a spray gun... most spray guns will work great if these key directions are followed

    material to air set properly
    distance
    speed
    overlap
    viscosity / temperature of paint
    temp of substrate
    booth / garage temp ****Note Added by OFB***: Pig Barn Temp
    clean air

    etc etc

    if you do not practice the above you might as well buy the cheapest gun possible
    PD's point is probably redundant for this forum's experts, but for a rookie like myself, I had to learn (the hard way) about each one of those variables - and actually I am still learning.

    But, what I found as a total newbie to this hobby (for me) is that the better guns allowed me to more easily produce a better finish. The first time that I shot clear through a FLG-4 compared to a Starting Line gun I was amazed. After I purchased a Sagola 4600 from Len, I was stunned at the atomization with pretty bone head settings (full fan, fluid knob just kissing the trigger, 2 bar, duh). I could also tell the difference between the Sagola CC cap and the Sagola HVLP cap which I just never got the hang of and just don't use anymore as I don't need to.

    Anyway, unlike say something like an advanced wakeboard which you don't want to put a first time beginner on, I believe a good gun will help a rookie if they have one available.

    BTW, that is a smoking price on that FLG-5. Is that a European spec Devilbiss? If so, is there a US equivalent?

  13. #28
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    olympia,wa
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by OldFatBald View Post
    PD's point is probably redundant for this forum's experts, but for a rookie like myself, I had to learn (the hard way) about each one of those variables - and actually I am still learning.

    But, what I found as a total newbie to this hobby (for me) is that the better guns allowed me to more easily produce a better finish. The first time that I shot clear through a FLG-4 compared to a Starting Line gun I was amazed. After I purchased a Sagola 4600 from Len, I was stunned at the atomization with pretty bone head settings (full fan, fluid knob just kissing the trigger, 2 bar, duh). I could also tell the difference between the Sagola CC cap and the Sagola HVLP cap which I just never got the hang of and just don't use anymore as I don't need to.

    Anyway, unlike say something like an advanced wakeboard which you don't want to put a first time beginner on, I believe a good gun will help a rookie if they have one available.

    BTW, that is a smoking price on that FLG-5. Is that a European spec Devilbiss? If so, is there a US equivalent?
    i originally thought it was a euro gun but i found a seller in the states for it.
    https://spraygunner.com/devilbiss-fl...c-plastic-cup/
    if this seller can get it len probably can too.
    b marler

  14. #29

    Default

    There may be a source in the US but I could not find it.

    I bought mine from Spraygunsdirect. I took a chance on the overseas process but it turned out rather well.

    Agreed with the above posts about getting what you pay for and the importance of what goes under the paint.

    I have a 72K5 Blazer and a 69 Chevy truck.

    I will paint the truck as it will be a daily driver. It will see time in the bushes and mud during hunting season. I want it to be as nice as I can do but at the end of the day it is not headed to Barrett-Jackson. LOL The FLG5 will do me well for the truck.

    I bought the Blazer mid-project from another guy. His metal work and body work is exceptional. The Blazer is rust free and all is left is final paint. The Blazer is a much nicer vehicle than I am a painter. The end result on the Blazer I am looking for is more than my skill set.

    I am sure in the right hands the FLG5 would offer great results. But since my expectations are higher I will pay a pro to paint the Blazer. Odds are this guy has a better gun and his gun choice will help him meet my expectations.

    That is my approach on matching the end result with a suitable gun.

    S

  15. #30
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    38,889

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bmarler View Post
    i originally thought it was a euro gun but i found a seller in the states for it.
    https://spraygunner.com/devilbiss-fl...c-plastic-cup/
    if this seller can get it len probably can too.
    I may have a supplier for that gun but I noticed that it's made in Brazil and parts may be difficult to get.

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