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Thread: Small burn through clear

  1. #1

    Default Small burn through clear

    Hi all, great forum! been doing lots of reading for hours on here but can't find a solution to my exact problem (size and location of blemish)
    It's a 78 Camaro I removed all panels, then stripped paint with chemical stripper, primed, blocked, painted light blue metalic base with ppg omni and matrix clear 2 wet coats of clear. first time painting a bc/cc, it turned out pretty good some runs on first coat, As I was carefully sanding the runs to the point i could no longer feel them I could still see the shadow of them there, looking very closely i could see tiny holes burnt into the base so i kept sanding eventually burning a lady bug size spot down to the base, this spot is where the TYPELT emblem goes so it may not be too noticable. the other spot i burned through was on the rear wheel opening in the centre style line closest to the tire the size of a pine needle, however that whole edge was light on clear and i can see a faint line along the whole bottom edge. I sprayed the clear 2 weeks ago and car has been sitting in cool 40-50deg side of shop which i warm a bit to do the cut and buff but not over 60 during that time.
    I was going to wait until I paint the other panels before I try to repairs but wanted to check here first to get an opinion as to weather the new clear has any chance of bonding chemically to the 2 week old stuff or is that window closed.
    I will add pics, maybe someone could suggest how they would go about this.
    Thanks in advance
    Jim
    Attached Images Attached Images

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
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    If the clear is a good quality you should be able to scuff the surface with some 1200/1500 and blend the new clear but you may find a slight difference in color where there was the original burn through. I usually use a small detail gun and blend the color and the clear being careful not to apply the color too wet or you can cause the clear to wrinkle around the hole.

  3. #3

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Len View Post
    If the clear is a good quality you should be able to scuff the surface with some 1200/1500 and blend the new clear but you may find a slight difference in color where there was the original burn through. I usually use a small detail gun and blend the color and the clear being careful not to apply the color too wet or you can cause the clear to wrinkle around the hole.
    Thanks for the reply Len, I have had lots of issues getting this far, some have felt like quick sand, every time I try to fix something I sink in a little deeper. I want to avoid that this time and having kind people like yourself willing to give advice makes me feel more confident in a successful repair.
    Thanks
    Jim

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by JMTC View Post
    Thanks for the reply Len, I have had lots of issues getting this far, some have felt like quick sand, every time I try to fix something I sink in a little deeper. I want to avoid that this time and having kind people like yourself willing to give advice makes me feel more confident in a successful repair.
    Thanks
    Jim
    Repairing a new paint job can be tricky and it's best to take your time to do it properly. When you sand to prep the surface you want to be sure to sand out far enough so that your sand scratches will extend beyond the new paint spot. Be sure to blend the clear like you would blend color, apply the clear normally over the spot then over reduce the clear and extend the area slightly then, while the clear is still wet, spray a light mist coat over the edge of the spot to melt in the dry edge. Allow the repair to fully cure then polish.

  5. #5

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Len View Post
    Repairing a new paint job can be tricky and it's best to take your time to do it properly. When you sand to prep the surface you want to be sure to sand out far enough so that your sand scratches will extend beyond the new paint spot. Be sure to blend the clear like you would blend color, apply the clear normally over the spot then over reduce the clear and extend the area slightly then, while the clear is still wet, spray a light mist coat over the edge of the spot to melt in the dry edge. Allow the repair to fully cure then polish.
    Just to clarify, over reduce with reducer? as in DO NOT use thinners?
    I will get a touch up gun when i go to the city tomorrow.
    Thanks again
    Jim

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
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    12,708

    Default Same...

    Quote Originally Posted by JMTC View Post
    Just to clarify, over reduce with reducer? as in DO NOT use thinners?
    I will get a touch up gun when i go to the city tomorrow.
    Thanks again
    Jim
    Some people call it both names. However, REDUCE with the appropriate urethane reducer you've added to your basecoat.

    Henry

  7. #7

    Default

    Awesome got it!!
    Thanks
    Jim

  8. #8

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JMTC View Post
    Awesome got it!!
    Thanks
    Jim
    Ugh, I noticed a wave in the rear fender body line from a run I sanded out. I put sharpie all over it as a guide coat and wet sanded with p1200 then buffed. I burned through again
    I only put 2 coats of clear on in the first place, (advice from local body shop owner) I assume that suggestion was a save money business thing. anyway I am leaning on a complete re-clear because of the burn through's and the fact that out of those 2 coats there is likely only 1/2 coat left after sanding out all the orange peel.
    It's been 2 weeks since I painted the tub.
    Correct me if i'm wrong: I don't need to redo door jambs, rockers or trunk opening, just mask a soft edge and scuff around openings.
    My biggest fear is that the new clear won't stick to the old (sanded of course) as Kevin from Eastwood points out it's now a mechanical bond not chemical.
    question: Will this new clear bond, look, last as good as clear bonded to base?
    If I want perfection should I start over from square one with paint stripper?

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    40,568

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JMTC View Post
    Ugh, I noticed a wave in the rear fender body line from a run I sanded out. I put sharpie all over it as a guide coat and wet sanded with p1200 then buffed. I burned through again
    I only put 2 coats of clear on in the first place, (advice from local body shop owner) I assume that suggestion was a save money business thing. anyway I am leaning on a complete re-clear because of the burn through's and the fact that out of those 2 coats there is likely only 1/2 coat left after sanding out all the orange peel.
    It's been 2 weeks since I painted the tub.
    Correct me if i'm wrong: I don't need to redo door jambs, rockers or trunk opening, just mask a soft edge and scuff around openings.
    My biggest fear is that the new clear won't stick to the old (sanded of course) as Kevin from Eastwood points out it's now a mechanical bond not chemical.
    question: Will this new clear bond, look, last as good as clear bonded to base?
    If I want perfection should I start over from square one with paint stripper?
    If you sand it well with some 1200/1500 and you're using a "good" clear you should be fine. Good clear usually costs between $200 and $300 a gallon plus the hardener and reducer.

  10. #10

    Default

    It's Matrix AG-40LV autoglas Euro design 5 litres was $140 two to one. Hardener $116 Canadian plus 13%hst lol. Not quite to the good level.
    On a positive note I will know better how to coat the rest of the car parts, and just redo the tub for the 3rd time if the clear fails.
    Thanks for posting back so quick, really appreciate it.
    Jim

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    40,568

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JMTC View Post
    It's Matrix AG-40LV autoglas Euro design 5 litres was $140 two to one. Hardener $116 Canadian plus 13%hst lol. Not quite to the good level.
    On a positive note I will know better how to coat the rest of the car parts, and just redo the tub for the 3rd time if the clear fails.
    Thanks for posting back so quick, really appreciate it.
    Jim
    I'm not familiar with the working characteristics of Matrix, it may work fine.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    273

    Default

    Just remember heat and sunlight is your friend. That Clear by Matrix is good and go what Len said.

  13. #13

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by tommie.b View Post
    Just remember heat and sunlight is your friend. That Clear by Matrix is good and go what Len said.
    (Just remember heat and sunlight is your friend.) I assume you mean for clear to harden up properly?

    Jim

  14. #14

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JMTC View Post
    Ugh, I noticed a wave in the rear fender body line from a run I sanded out. I put sharpie all over it as a guide coat and wet sanded with p1200 then buffed. I burned through again
    I only put 2 coats of clear on in the first place, (advice from local body shop owner) I assume that suggestion was a save money business thing. anyway I am leaning on a complete re-clear because of the burn through's and the fact that out of those 2 coats there is likely only 1/2 coat left after sanding out all the orange peel.
    It's been 2 weeks since I painted the tub.
    Correct me if i'm wrong: I don't need to redo door jambs, rockers or trunk opening, just mask a soft edge and scuff around openings.
    My biggest fear is that the new clear won't stick to the old (sanded of course) as Kevin from Eastwood points out it's now a mechanical bond not chemical.
    question: Will this new clear bond, look, last as good as clear bonded to base?
    If I want perfection should I start over from square one with paint stripper?
    I bought a new finish line gun and I am going to base coat the rear quarter then re clear whole tub this weekend. How many coats clear should I put on? 3?

    Jim

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    40,568

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JMTC View Post
    I bought a new finish line gun and I am going to base coat the rear quarter then re clear whole tub this weekend. How many coats clear should I put on? 3?

    Jim
    Two even coats should be enough as long as you don't have any additional problems.

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