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Thread: Would this compressor be good?

  1. #1

    Default Would this compressor be good?

    There is an older 3 head compressor with dryer on it locally on facebook for $250. Says it works great. Would this compressor be enough to do anything I was likely to do? Any idea about the dryer? I know good dryers are super expensive on their own.

    It is a dental compressor? I assume it means in a dentists office? 3hp, 100 psi. Model number ALCRL62D. 220v. It seems like this compressor would pretty decent and probably built to a higher standard than normal compressors.

    Am I better off just getting a big standup one? I currently have an old 2hp craftman compressor made by Devilbiss. I occasionally run out of air running air tools and I doubt I could run an HVLP all day on it but it runs flawlessly. It ran my air sander all day no problem but it did run a lot and that comes with lots of water since I'm in a high humidity place.
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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
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    lower Michigan
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    Quote Originally Posted by RealFloopyGuy View Post
    There is an older 3 head compressor with dryer on it locally on facebook for $250. Says it works great. Would this compressor be enough to do anything I was likely to do? Any idea about the dryer? I know good dryers are super expensive on their own.

    It is a dental compressor? I assume it means in a dentists office? 3hp, 100 psi. Model number ALCRL62D. 220v. It seems like this compressor would pretty decent and probably built to a higher standard than normal compressors.

    Am I better off just getting a big standup one? I currently have an old 2hp craftman compressor made by Devilbiss. I occasionally run out of air running air tools and I doubt I could run an HVLP all day on it but it runs flawlessly. It ran my air sander all day no problem but it did run a lot and that comes with lots of water since I'm in a high humidity place.
    If that compressor is from a dentists office then it's logically going to have low CFM. Before you buy it do some research and fine out what the CFM output of that compressor is.

    As far as air dryers go I have never had the need for an air dryer and I never worked in shop that did have an air dryer. (Michigan gets very humid in the summer months). If your compressor pluming layout is done right you won't need an air dryer. Naturally the more expensive the compressor in most cases the lesser amount of water it will produce. Those little compressors like your 2hp oil/piston 20 gallon tank compressors run at high rpms which in turn producers more heat, more heat equals more moisture being produced. My Quincy compressor runs at 900 rpm. Rule of thumb -- never buy a compressor that runs faster than a thousand rpm. Don't buy a compressor with a tank smaller than 60 gallon and produces at least 12 cfm. Most one or two man shops use an 80 gallon two stage 17 - 22 cfm 220v single phase with a minimum of 20ft of stationary hard air lines (black iron like gas pipe or copper air lines, I prefer black iron pipe).

    The best advice I can give you is pass on that dental compressor and look for a good used industrial 5hp 80 gallon air compressor with the specs listed above. There are several brands that would serve you well -- Curtis, Kellog American, Champion, Ingersoll Rand etc that can be had for $500 or less if you keep your eyes open for a good deal. If you're lucky you can come across a good used Quincy, Atlas Copco or Saylor Beale compressor. Before you lay out any cash have someone that knows compressors check it out for you to make sure it's still a good compressor. A good quality industrial air compressor will last a lifetime. My Quincy air compressor has been working flawlessly for 35 years and I use it just about every day of those 35 years.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Boring Oregon
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    I bought a $300 harbor freight refrigerated air dryer for my shop. I have an auto drain on my compressor, a filter on the way to the dryer, an auto drain in the dryer and then a final filter at the point of use.
    Over the last year, I have drained exactly nothing from my lines. Open em up and nothing but air comes out.

    I think the auto drain on the tank really helps to keep water out but I'm a fan of the dryer cooler unit. With a 20% off coupon, hell, i can replace it every 3-5 years and its cheap insurance.

    Now that compressor is going to be very low cfm so it won't work for squat for sanding and spraying except maybe a air brush.

    It may work for a fresh air supply for a hood, but you would need to verify it's flow and cleanliness for human breathing.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    lower Michigan
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    Be very careful about using an general use air compressor to feed air to a supplied air hood. It could kill you, litterally. Air compressor tanks have warm moist air in them as a direct result of the air pump pumping air into the air tank. That warm moist air is a breeding ground for bacteria which if breathed in can kill you. ANY supplied air hood/mask that uses air from a regular air compressor MUST have a filtration system to make the air breathable. They are expensive to buy and expensive to maintain with new filters.

    Never hook up a supplied air hood or mask to a regular air compressor.

  5. #5

    Default

    I'm going to pass on it. I was just curious if it was suitable. I think just getting a bigger tank and hooking it to my current compressor would be fine if I don't find a good deal on a full compressor. I have a desiccant/separator setup and I use a filter at the gun. With my LVLP I've had no problem with moisture or air flow. My sand blaster and impact guns are the only things that really uses my air up and forces me to stop and wait occasionally.

    I don't see me ever getting a supplied air setup in the foreseeable future. I've been painting outside and I use the 3m style respirator. Maybe once I have a garage that my fat butt can move around a vehicle in. As it is, I had to jump out the back of my Bronco once I pulled it into the shop to protect it after I painted it since I could get out the door.

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