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Thread: Rust treatment in door seam...

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Northern MN
    Posts
    38

    Default Rust treatment in door seam...

    Hi Gang, I have a Dodge Dart door that is in great shape but it was sitting outside and there was a lot of damp leaves and dirt that gathered inside it and settled in the bottom seam. I flushed to door out and dried it but there is surface rust visible in the seam when I look inside. The outside of the seam looks fine with no swelling or heavy rust. I have some Zero Rust and POR15. I was thinking about pouring some inside and sealing the seam.

    Which of these products would be better for this, and should I try to get a scuff pad or sandpaper in there first? Also, would it make sense to do this before filler and primer work on the outside so sanding dust won't find its way into the seam? Any better ideas to stop/prevent rust in the seam?

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Boring Oregon
    Posts
    1,874

    Default

    First off it needs to be hosed out really well and cleaned. Then blown out, then scuff / sand all the visible rust.

    You could do a rust converter in there, but I would be worried that letting that into the hem seam at the bottom may actually cause more problems for you. Perhaps just use a cloth dampened with the converter. You might wait for more experience for a better response on that.

    On my doors, after sandblasting the outside and as much of the inside as I could, I ended up brushing ZR along the entire bottom seam and up about 1" on either side with the ZR. Then I sanded the seam on the outside to make sure no rust was visible, wiped it with converter and epoxy prime the outside of the door. After that I used seam sealer on the outter seam.

    I am not sure this is a perfect system, but I'm hoping it was good enough.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    40,553

    Default

    I would brush in the ZR, allow it to dry then seal the seam using a good seam sealer. Run the seam sealer up the ends of the seam a couple inches.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Northern MN
    Posts
    38

    Default

    Thanks guys!

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