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Thread: Silverado Wreck Repair.

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2018
    Posts
    1

    Default Silverado Wreck Repair.

    Hello board members. Just bought a salvaged Silverado. Damage looked minimal, Rocker panel and cab corner replacement. The door was hit as well so I figured junk yard replacement. Before we replace the cab corner and rocker panel we figured we would throw the new door on and test the fitment. Well as usual we found that the door does not fit properly. Upon further inspection I found a bubble in the cab right behind the cab corner. Obviously we think the cab crunched inwards a bit. We are thinking about spot drilling the cab corner and knocking it back forward to meet the door. My worry is maybe we could get it close by just bending the door hinges as you can see in the pictures the door sucks in 1/3 of an inch at the top. In the middle its close and at the bottom it sticks out about 3/4 of an inch. There is no Frame damage. Please look at the pictures and give insight.

    20181123_120124.jpg20181123_161257.jpg20181123_161259.jpg20181123_161308.jpg20181123_163650.jpg

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    1,997

    Default

    When I do work on a car like that I remove the seats and carpet. Sometimes I don't find anything but you don't know until you look. They come out easy. I think this truck is wanting for that kind if inspection. I would get a full rocker and when you try to fit it on you will see the full magnitude of the damage to the door opening on the bottom. Don't just cut a section of the new rocker and install it, go from front to back all the way. Also don't be to sure the door you got wasn't damaged in the wreck it came from. The A pillar of the donor could have been distorted and bent the door without much damage to the skin or damage to the left side of the truck may have pushed the roof into the door you got. Does the window glass move as it should? You can take a ruler and straight edge and cross check multiple spots using the good door on the other side of your truck.

    Maybe it's just the angle of the photo but the cab to box gap looks off a bit. Is the gap at bottom and top the same on both sides of the truck? That row of removed spot welds doesn't look as flat as I remember it should. When you take the sill plates out to remove the carpet you will be able to check one side of the cab against the other. They are quite symmetrical. You can make a cardboard template of the drivers side with a marker then cut it out and bring it to the other side to be sure it's the same. It isn't just for looks, you will want to get the door fitment as close as you can get it so the wind noise doesn't drive you crazy going down the highway. Do you know the "dollar bill test"? Take a dollar bill and close the door on it. You should be able to pull it against some resistance. Move it 6" to another spot and pull again. Do that all the way around the door. You don't want the bill to be trapped so tight that it might rip or so free that it slides with little resistance. That will tell you where you need to work on fitment for wind noise. Removing the seats and carpet will tell you if there is more serious damage to the cab.

    Be sure to check the frame. It may not have been totaled just because of the door damage. You don't know if after the impact it went off the road and through the air and landed hard on it's wheels or slammed into the back slope of the road.

    One last trick is to go to your insurance company with the VIN number and ask them if they can get a copy of the estimate of damage that the other company used to total out the truck. This isn't something the secretary/receptionist is likely to be able to do, but a principle in the office should be able to do it. I've done that for several of my cars when it wasn't obvious what the damage was. Those guys talk to each other but they don't all provide that info to customers and some states may not allow it.

    Bob K

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    11,688

    Default Salvage...

    Quote Originally Posted by Bob K View Post
    When I do work on a car like that I remove the seats and carpet. Sometimes I don't find anything but you don't know until you look. They come out easy. I think this truck is wanting for that kind if inspection. I would get a full rocker and when you try to fit it on you will see the full magnitude of the damage to the door opening on the bottom. Don't just cut a section of the new rocker and install it, go from front to back all the way. Also don't be to sure the door you got wasn't damaged in the wreck it came from. The A pillar of the donor could have been distorted and bent the door without much damage to the skin or damage to the left side of the truck may have pushed the roof into the door you got. Does the window glass move as it should? You can take a ruler and straight edge and cross check multiple spots using the good door on the other side of your truck.

    Maybe it's just the angle of the photo but the cab to box gap looks off a bit. Is the gap at bottom and top the same on both sides of the truck? That row of removed spot welds doesn't look as flat as I remember it should. When you take the sill plates out to remove the carpet you will be able to check one side of the cab against the other. They are quite symmetrical. You can make a cardboard template of the drivers side with a marker then cut it out and bring it to the other side to be sure it's the same. It isn't just for looks, you will want to get the door fitment as close as you can get it so the wind noise doesn't drive you crazy going down the highway. Do you know the "dollar bill test"? Take a dollar bill and close the door on it. You should be able to pull it against some resistance. Move it 6" to another spot and pull again. Do that all the way around the door. You don't want the bill to be trapped so tight that it might rip or so free that it slides with little resistance. That will tell you where you need to work on fitment for wind noise. Removing the seats and carpet will tell you if there is more serious damage to the cab.

    Be sure to check the frame. It may not have been totaled just because of the door damage. You don't know if after the impact it went off the road and through the air and landed hard on it's wheels or slammed into the back slope of the road.

    One last trick is to go to your insurance company with the VIN number and ask them if they can get a copy of the estimate of damage that the other company used to total out the truck. This isn't something the secretary/receptionist is likely to be able to do, but a principle in the office should be able to do it. I've done that for several of my cars when it wasn't obvious what the damage was. Those guys talk to each other but they don't all provide that info to customers and some states may not allow it.

    Bob K
    Usually, salvage bought from COPART comes with the damage report from the insurance company that you speak of. Salvage yard should have a copy as well.

    You are right, Bob, it is worth having.

    Henry

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    11,688

    Default ChrisX...

    Take some diagonal measurements of the opening. Get (hopefully) correct numbers from the other side or go measure another truck somewhere.

    Often, if the opening is out of square a 10 ton porta power can help. It may even take out the wave you have in the panel. Of course everything depends on YOUR damage that unfortunately we cannot see and touch.

    Also, when you remove the rocker you may cause a sag in the body. Some jacks and support under the body in that area should be used.

    Keep us posted.

    Henry

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