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Thread: Anyone have a Millermatic 211 mig welder ?

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    Default Anyone have a Millermatic 211 mig welder ?

    I picked up a very lightly used two year old Millermatic 211 mig welder from a buddy of mine who said he didn't run a full spool of wire through it. I haven't tried it out yet because I wanted a new tip and nozzle to start with and everything was closed today (Sunday).
    From write up's on the net a lot of people like the mig welder. I'm just wondering if anyone out there can offer some tips and miscellaneous info that might help.

    I gave $500 cash plus my 20 year old Century 160 mig welder that has been and still is an excellent mig welder. Never had an issue with it, it still has the original cable liner. That century 160 was the older technology with the large transformer (weighs twice as much as the newer Miller 211 with inverter technology).

    I was told that the inverter mig welders don't sound the same as the older large transformer mig welders. The older technology welders sounded like frying eggs when the welder was set right and welding right. I was told the newer inverter style migs are more of a buzzing sound. I was also told it was easier to dial in the older technology.

    the Millermatic 211 is rated at 230 amps but I don't believe it was designed to weld at that amperage for an extended periods of time. From what I can find on the net that welder is ideal for bodyshops, farms, fabrications shops etc. NOT or welding up bulldozers or heavy semi-truck stuff.

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    Phil is this the 240v / 110v mig ?? If so I have the Hobart and what a great little machine.

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    Quote Originally Posted by tommie.b View Post
    Phil is this the 240v / 110v mig ?? If so I have the Hobart and what a great little machine.
    Yes, Tommie, it is the dual voltage one. The one I have is the second generation of the Miller 211 which came out in 2016.

    Here is a cut-n-paste from google ------ The Millermatic 211 has now been replaced by a new inverter-based Millermatic 211 MIG Welder. ... Quite possibly the best selling MIG welder in the history of the world, the Millermatic 211 MIG Welder with Auto-Set can weld material from 24-gauge to 3/8in. thick in a single pass

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    Quote Originally Posted by Phil V View Post
    Yes, Tommie, it is the dual voltage one. The one I have is the second generation of the Miller 211 which came out in 2016.

    Here is a cut-n-paste from google ------ The Millermatic 211 has now been replaced by a new inverter-based Millermatic 211 MIG Welder. ... Quite possibly the best selling MIG welder in the history of the world, the Millermatic 211 MIG Welder with Auto-Set can weld material from 24-gauge to 3/8in. thick in a single pass

    I have a Miller 211 and love it. Not sure which one it is as I bought it about 2 1/2 years ago. I wired my garage for 220V but don't ever use the 220V, as I am usually welding sheetmetal and the 110V works just fine.

    I wasn't sure about such a small welder as a welder should be huge is what I always had in my head - but that little Miller is awesome!

    I still listen for the frying bacon sound and now I am hungry….

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    Quote Originally Posted by OldFatBald View Post
    I have a Miller 211 and love it. Not sure which one it is as I bought it about 2 1/2 years ago. I wired my garage for 220V but don't ever use the 220V, as I am usually welding sheetmetal and the 110V works just fine.

    I wasn't sure about such a small welder as a welder should be huge is what I always had in my head - but that little Miller is awesome!

    I still listen for the frying bacon sound and now I am hungry….
    My 20 year old Century 160 mig welder weighed around 85 pounds and it was an excellent welder, (still is an excellent welder). I figured like a lot of people that the old heavy transformer type mig welders and plasma cutters were the best. But I admit, I was wrong. I'm getting dragged into the 21st century kicking and screaming all the way. What sold me on inverter technology is I picked up an inverter based plasma cutter (70 amp). It far exceeded my expectations and I have nothing but good things to say about it. I bought a 50 amp Lotos plasma cutter first and it didn't cut as well as I had hoped for and it didn't have pilot arch starting. I paid like $350 for it and ended up giving it my daughter who does metal art. I then picked up the 70 amp Lotos plasma cutter with Pilot arch and it was a huge difference. I can cut 1/4 steel faster with that plasma cutter than I can with my oxy/acetylene torch. That first 50 amp lotos I had without the pilot arc really ate up consumables (tips etc). The 70 amp with pilot arc consumables last waaay longer than the one without pilot arc.

    Anyway, that plasma cutter sold me on inverter technology which is why I chose the inverter based Millermatic 211. I haven't taken the time to play with yet because I have a couple small projects I want out of the way before I check out the miller mig welder. When I do stuff like checking out the new welder I need to be alone with no distractions so I can relax and concentrate on what I'm doing.

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    i have quite a few various welders laying about and all of them have their pluses and minuses. inverter technology can be awesome for some processes, but there's always going to be a place for the older transformer based machines.
    with that 211 you really need to pay attention to the duty cycle, especially at 110 volt input. you'll scrap the capacitors if you're not paying attention.
    that said, i guess most people on this forum are only welding sheet stock or light structural steel, so the small/ lightweight machines are ideal.
    inverter machines also tend to have more electronic features and if you're lucky you can access them to really dial it in for your particular usage. i don't think i'd care for auto set, i prefer to do things the way i want to.
    my bread and butter mig is the miller 251. i had a 252 but sold it off as the feed mechanism wasn't as solid. this machine is a real solid, smooth running welder. i also have an older airco 160 mig with a spot timer with lighter gauge wire that i like for sheet stock. these transformer welders work better for me as i need the better higher cycle, and i like the smooth/stable feel of the arc.
    i use inverter machines for tig and plasma, being able to shape the waveform on tig is huge, and inverter welders do it better.
    i would admit though, having a multi voltage small mig has a certain attraction.
    b marler

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    Quote Originally Posted by bmarler View Post
    i have quite a few various welders laying about and all of them have their pluses and minuses. inverter technology can be awesome for some processes, but there's always going to be a place for the older transformer based machines.
    with that 211 you really need to pay attention to the duty cycle, especially at 110 volt input. you'll scrap the capacitors if you're not paying attention.
    that said, i guess most people on this forum are only welding sheet stock or light structural steel, so the small/ lightweight machines are ideal.
    inverter machines also tend to have more electronic features and if you're lucky you can access them to really dial it in for your particular usage. i don't think i'd care for auto set, i prefer to do things the way i want to.
    my bread and butter mig is the miller 251. i had a 252 but sold it off as the feed mechanism wasn't as solid. this machine is a real solid, smooth running welder. i also have an older airco 160 mig with a spot timer with lighter gauge wire that i like for sheet stock. these transformer welders work better for me as i need the better higher cycle, and i like the smooth/stable feel of the arc.
    i use inverter machines for tig and plasma, being able to shape the waveform on tig is huge, and inverter welders do it better.
    i would admit though, having a multi voltage small mig has a certain attraction.
    I don't think calling the Millermatic 211 a "small light weight machine" is an accurate depiction. The machine is rated for up to 230 amps. That is some serious welding power compared similar priced machines. At 150 amps it's rated a 40% duty cycle. Like any other tool it's fantastic when it's used for what it was designed to do. It's not going to "pop" any capacitors because it has automatic shutoff before the caps are damaged. This machine is not designed to weld half inch plate steel all day long non stop. It was designed for auto body shops, light fabrications shops, farms usage etc. If you want to weld bulldozers all day long then buy a $4,000 - $7,000 welding machine designed for heavy industrial use.

    Lets be clear on exactly what duty cycle is and how it relates to real life welding. NO ONE welds steady for 8 hours, don't care if you're a professional welder building aircraft carriers. There is down time for layout of materials that need to be welded, measuring and marking cuts and weld positions, taking breaks etc etc. I doubt if the average welding operation in a body shop would need anywhere near a 40% duty cycle at 150 amps. Even if you're building something out of 1/4" or 5/16 steel you'r not going to be actually physically welding more than 4 minutes out of ever ten minutes.

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    Phil is 100% right,don't under estimate this machine....... my old mig was a Hobart Beta-Mig 250 a heavy duty welder and the new Hobart Handler beats it hands down for sheet metal to about 1/4 plate! Never any problem with duty cycle.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Phil V View Post
    I don't think calling the Millermatic 211 a "small light weight machine" is an accurate depiction. The machine is rated for up to 230 amps. That is some serious welding power compared similar priced machines. At 150 amps it's rated a 40% duty cycle. Like any other tool it's fantastic when it's used for what it was designed to do. It's not going to "pop" any capacitors because it has automatic shutoff before the caps are damaged. This machine is not designed to weld half inch plate steel all day long non stop. It was designed for auto body shops, light fabrications shops, farms usage etc. If you want to weld bulldozers all day long then buy a $4,000 - $7,000 welding machine designed for heavy industrial use.

    Lets be clear on exactly what duty cycle is and how it relates to real life welding. NO ONE welds steady for 8 hours, don't care if you're a professional welder building aircraft carriers. There is down time for layout of materials that need to be welded, measuring and marking cuts and weld positions, taking breaks etc etc. I doubt if the average welding operation in a body shop would need anywhere near a 40% duty cycle at 150 amps. Even if you're building something out of 1/4" or 5/16 steel you'r not going to be actually physically welding more than 4 minutes out of ever ten minutes.
    relax phil, i wasn't dissing the machine, it just has a limited capacity for what i personally do. you're right that it's probably great for a person doing autobody work.
    but it is a small machine, designed for lightweight work. that's why it works well for bodywork. just don't expect it to do any heavy lifting. i'd be bumping that duty cycle easily, and if you do that, or run up on the auto shut-off often you are going to have issues. a lot of guys are using this at 120 volt input and the duty cycle is only 20%. and if you try to run 150 amps with that 100 amp torch for more than a minute or two you'll be damaging that too. i was only saying to be aware.
    i build equipment. industrial stuff. and you're right that there's a lot of time not welding. doing layout, cutting parts, etc... but there are stretches where i burn wire for extended periods. i have some welders that have 100% duty cycle rating for this type of abuse.
    but for bodywork... probable excellent.
    b marler

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    Quote Originally Posted by bmarler View Post
    relax phil, i wasn't dissing the machine, it just has a limited capacity for what i personally do. you're right that it's probably great for a person doing autobody work.
    but it is a small machine, designed for lightweight work. that's why it works well for bodywork. just don't expect it to do any heavy lifting. i'd be bumping that duty cycle easily, and if you do that, or run up on the auto shut-off often you are going to have issues. a lot of guys are using this at 120 volt input and the duty cycle is only 20%. and if you try to run 150 amps with that 100 amp torch for more than a minute or two you'll be damaging that too. i was only saying to be aware.
    i build equipment. industrial stuff. and you're right that there's a lot of time not welding. doing layout, cutting parts, etc... but there are stretches where i burn wire for extended periods. i have some welders that have 100% duty cycle rating for this type of abuse.
    but for bodywork... probable excellent.
    You're spinning this thread in a direction that is not about the millermatic 211. It's like you dissing an Ford F150 pick up truck because you have a dump truck that can haul 5 times as much sand and gravel. You are comparing apples and oranges. It's not a small machine at 230 amp output rating and it's not designed for "light work" at welding 3/8" place in a single pass.

    Lets be honest here, no one in their right mind is going to pay $1300 to $1800 for a Millermatic 211 with the idea of using the welder on 110 volts AC as their long term power source. There are many welders out there that run on 110v AC for a small fraction of the what the Miller costs. The advantage of the Miller 211 is that it CAN be used away from the shop where 220v is not available for some kind of off site repair or light duty welding. The alternative to that would be to buy a $10,000 Miller with it's own gas engine that is permanently truck mounted. No one is going to buy a thousand dollar Sata spray gun to do full paints with a 2 gallon porter cable 120v air compressor.

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    geez phil, i said relax.
    miller says right on on it's website it's a light duty machine. like i said, for autobody work, it's probably excellent.
    b marler

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    Quote Originally Posted by bmarler View Post
    geez phil, i said relax.
    miller says right on on it's website it's a light duty machine. like i said, for autobody work, it's probably excellent.
    Oh. as long as you say relax then I guess I should do as you say, right ? I AM relaxed. You're pissing on a thread that has nothing to do with you.

    IT IS NOT A LIGHT DUTY MACHINE AT 230 AMPS RATED OUTPUT. A light duty machine is a 110V (ONLY) flux core mig welder that is rated at less than a hundred amps.

    A buddy of mine has a Millermatic 200 that is HUGE compared to the newer technology. It's so heavy it has a permanent lift eyelet on top of the machine. It's rated at 60% duty cycle. By your standards that is a light duty machine.

    I'm done here. I used to value your opinion, I no longer do that.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Phil V View Post
    Oh. as long as you say relax then I guess I should do as you say, right ? I AM relaxed. You're pissing on a thread that has nothing to do with you.

    IT IS NOT A LIGHT DUTY MACHINE AT 230 AMPS RATED OUTPUT. A light duty machine is a 110V (ONLY) flux core mig welder that is rated at less than a hundred amps.

    A buddy of mine has a Millermatic 200 that is HUGE compared to the newer technology. It's so heavy it has a permanent lift eyelet on top of the machine. It's rated at 60% duty cycle. By your standards that is a light duty machine.

    I'm done here. I used to value your opinion, I no longer do that.
    well that got ugly for no reason. obviously your version and my version of light duty are two very different things. the last thing i wanted to do was start a pissing match.
    i only offered an opinion here because i have been doing metalwork/fabrication for 30 plus years. it's a subject where i have considerable knowledge and was only trying to add something to the conversation. i wasn't intending to irritate anyone.
    the 211 is a quality machine, and i'd love to have one in my home garage but i wouldn't use it at my work shop as it's just not practical. and for the more serious home fabricator who might be seam welding a trailer deck or something like that the duty cycle and 100 amp torch will come into play. that shouldn't be an insult to you, it's just how it is.
    if i offended you i apologize.
    b marler

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