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Thread: "Flattening Agent" for oil finish? (on wood)

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    12,359

    Default Agree!!!

    Quote Originally Posted by Phil V View Post
    Sam is THE man ! very knowledgeable all the way around. This place is lucky to have Sam onboard.
    Been saying that same thing for countless years!

    Henry

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    128

    Default Paint flattener

    There is a product for oil based paint which works. Penetrol

    Never used it on stain though. Good stuff.

    dlm ny county

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    olympia,wa
    Posts
    763

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by dlmrun2002 View Post
    There is a product for oil based paint which works. Penetrol

    Never used it on stain though. Good stuff.

    dlm ny county
    i use that all the time for it's ability to get product under the surface. 50/50 with spar varnish for the first coat gets it in deep. never noticed it would flatten the finish though. helps with flow time too.
    b marler

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Hawaii
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    22,263

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bmarler View Post
    i use that all the time for it's ability to get product under the surface. 50/50 with spar varnish for the first coat gets it in deep. never noticed it would flatten the finish though. helps with flow time too.
    It's been a while since I used Penetrol, but, iirc, it was for "improving the flow and gloss" of the paint. Especially in cold weather...

    Penetrol definitely helps the paint flow out nicely, creating a nice smooth surface that's free of brush marks...

    But that's a different kind of "flat"....

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Hawaii
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    22,263

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by baubau View Post
    so...you want to dull the finish chemically from thr " top down"..

    i guess you mean to apply something to the top of the finish thst is already applied..


    "to dull it" , perhaps, if we phrase it "To oxidize it"....???

    Ajax, Somethigng chlorine based , oxidizing agent, would that work??...

    i am just guessing here..
    I'm gonna try that, and I'll post the results soon baubau

    This task has been "on hold" for a little while, but I just got back to it today... Sam G's trick with the talc worked real good!

    But, when the light is just right, and you look from the right angle, the difference is still obvious.

    --------------------------

    Here's one angle where it looks "perfect". And it looks perfect in real life from this angle too...




    ---------------------------

    But... One step to the left, one second later, with the light shining just right, at night... makes it looks like this




    ---------------------------

    So now I'm gonna let it dry thoroughly, and then I'll give it a quick wipe with some bleachy water to see what happens.

    The existing finish is pretty old, so the idea of "oxidizing" the new parts makes a lot of sense
    Attached Images Attached Images

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Talladega, Alabama
    Posts
    534

    Default

    Glad it appears to have worked out!

    I remember long ago finding it odd that flattening agent (or flake control) when spilled or dripped would leave a fine powder residue. After doing a little research I figured talc was a primary component.

    Have a great day

    SG

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    olympia,wa
    Posts
    763

    Default

    what about tsp? seems like that flattens cured glossy finishes.
    b marler

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