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Thread: Help with compounding/buffing!!

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
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    Default Help with compounding/buffing!!

    I sprayed my Caddy’s AC cover. I am very happy with the way that it came out except that I got a couple of small little blips in my flow coat of clear. I had to really look for them but they kept bothering me.

    The Clear is HOK URC01 Rokket clear

    I went to polish my AC cover out, to get rid of the blip in the clear per the suggestions provided to me in another post I used a fine nib file then hit it with 1500, 2500, 5000 on a DA wet

    I have some of the 3M Perfect-It polishes and have been using a 3” and some brand new 3M Perfect-It foam pads

    If it wasn’t for the little blips in my clear, I wouldn’t have even tried to use the polish but now I am having a hard time getting the shine back.

    really having a hard time getting the dullness out and it shows up most in the black.

    I used the coarser purple foam first with the compound then switched to the other polish using the black pad then the finer blue pad.

    * Any suggestions? I just don’t know what I’m doing wrong

    * Should I go back to the compound and apply more/less pressure?

    * Should I be running the polisher until the compound or polish is completely dry and buffs off?


    Im about to just hit the entire panel with 1000 and reshoot the clear!!

    Buffing 01.jpg

    Buffing01.jpg

  2. #2
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    Nov 2005
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    By the looks of that picture it seems like you're not getting the scratches out. If you have some 2500 or 3000 grit wet sandpaper I'd say to sand over those scratches thoroughly then try polishing by hand aggressively first before using the machine to see what you've got.

    The typical mistake that's made in this situation is that the surface is sanded with a coarse grit like 1000 grit then it's sanded with a finer grit but not enough to reach the bottom of the previous scratch and when it's polished the coarse scratches become visible.


  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2018
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    It looks like a partly curved panel, I don't have any idea what the AC cover means (air conditioner cover?). To use a DA on curved surface always is a risk to leave the panel not enough flat or to sand through the clear. Do it by hand. The peel is still there, it comes to show you that you still have enough clear to sand and buff without any worries.
    Use a medium hard block and P1000 wet to flat the surface. After that P1200, P1500, P2000 etc. Or if you are scared just start with P1200, it's your choice. But first remove all irregularities which disturb the flatness of your flow coat. Use a spot light, regularly clean the panel and spray a wet coat of clean water to check your progress how you are removing the scratches from the previous grit sandpaper. The water will show you everything. Use a masking tape to keep you away from the edges and avoid using a DA as much as possible.
    Everyone can buff and polish those large flat areas, these small details are the biggest challenge for every detailer.
    You're doing right, just be patient, don't rush, calm down and don't miss any steps.

    Good luck.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
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    olympia,wa
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    Quote Originally Posted by OldFatBald View Post
    I sprayed my Caddy’s AC cover. I am very happy with the way that it came out except that I got a couple of small little blips in my flow coat of clear. I had to really look for them but they kept bothering me.

    The Clear is HOK URC01 Rokket clear

    I went to polish my AC cover out, to get rid of the blip in the clear per the suggestions provided to me in another post I used a fine nib file then hit it with 1500, 2500, 5000 on a DA wet

    I have some of the 3M Perfect-It polishes and have been using a 3” and some brand new 3M Perfect-It foam pads

    If it wasn’t for the little blips in my clear, I wouldn’t have even tried to use the polish but now I am having a hard time getting the shine back.

    really having a hard time getting the dullness out and it shows up most in the black.

    I used the coarser purple foam first with the compound then switched to the other polish using the black pad then the finer blue pad.

    * Any suggestions? I just don’t know what I’m doing wrong

    * Should I go back to the compound and apply more/less pressure?

    * Should I be running the polisher until the compound or polish is completely dry and buffs off?


    Im about to just hit the entire panel with 1000 and reshoot the clear!!

    Buffing 01.jpg

    Buffing01.jpg
    what's that polisher you're using? a straight rotary is more effective at scratch removal in my experience. orbitals work good for the final pass to get rid of swirl marks. (my experience anyway)
    b marler

  5. #5
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    Mar 2016
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    Quote Originally Posted by bmarler View Post
    what's that polisher you're using? a straight rotary is more effective at scratch removal in my experience. orbitals work good for the final pass to get rid of swirl marks. (my experience anyway)

    Being a weekender rookie hack, I don't mind asking;

    * What do you mean by a Straight Rotary?


    The polisher that I used is a little 3” cheapy Griot's Garage Dual Action Random Orbital Polisher.

    I am using the 3M Perfect-it machine compound/polishes (1 & 2) and I have some of the ultra-fine (#3) ordered up.

    I figure that I need to learn the color sanding/polishing/buffing part of the system also. I had almost given up yesterday as I spent a LOT more time than I had expected (as usual). I had even brought out the quart of the clear and hardener to warm it up in the sun.
    Anyways after taking a break, ate some lunch and did a little University of YouTube then went back to it, since 1500 on a DA was the coarsest that I had started with, I got a half sheet of 2000, sanded it wet, then used one of my 6” DA 3000 grit pads by hand and followed up with a 6” DA 5000 grit pads by hand, both done wet.

    Then I went back to my coarsest foam pad with the 3M rubbing compound, then changed to two finer pads using the polish with my little 3” polisher

    It came out looking pretty good, but I think that it could be better.


    * What type of spot light do you use?

    * Does 3M make sheet sandpaper in 3000 & 5000?


    My original surface was almost perfect, was very “deep” looking but had the two little dust blips in it, which I doubt that I will be able to eliminate totally as I paint in my pig barn (shop). I’d like to be able to get the polishing down to that deep mirror finish.

    The funny thing is, there looks to be scratches in the photo below (right at the single light bulb reflection) that neither myself or my son, who eyes are good can see on the piece.

    Final Buff .jpg

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
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    Speed clears are normally harder to buff to start with. You need to take it to 3000 at minimum for the da polisher to be effective but a rotary will be best. It looks like the heavier scratches didnt get removed. I've never liked 3m to be honest. I always cut with wool first and polish with foam.

    Sometimes you can find Meguiars microfiber pads advanced auto parts that have good cut with a da polisher. You need to run it rather fast and put some pressure on it. Compound fast with moderate pressure and let off some as the compound starts to deminish. Polish slow with moderate pressure and back off as it starts to diminish as well.

  7. #7
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    Mar 2016
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    Quote Originally Posted by xtremekustomz View Post
    ...Compound fast with moderate pressure and let off some as the compound starts to deminish. Polish slow with moderate pressure and back off as it starts to diminish as well.
    I finally got it looking good but still need to work on my compounding /polishing skills - which I thought was going to be less complicated.

    I was about to just give up and just hit everything one more time with 800 wet and shoot another round of clear, but I decided to turn up the speed of the little Griot's 3 inch polisher and it came out pretty well.


    You need to take it to 3000 at minimum for the da polisher to be effective but a rotary will be best...
    I go to 5000 as my items are generally pretty small. Though I do have the trunk lid on my 65 Caddy that I will be doing soon.

    Please excuse the rookie question, but what is a "rotary"?

    For the small stuff, I have two 3 inch polishers, I have the little Griot's and a 3" air polisher that I got from Len (the pic below is not mine as I cant find it right now!!!)

    For the bigger stuff I have a Dewalt DWP849X with a (I think) 6" hook & loop backing pad.

    Griots 3 in polisher.jpg
    Air Polisher 3 in .jpg
    Dewalt Polisher 2.jpg

  8. #8
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    Nov 2013
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    olympia,wa
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    that dewalt is a rotary, as is that little air polisher. they just make a circle, not a random pattern. this will give you more cutting power. (and more likely to burn through if you're not careful) always buff "off the panel" with the rotary or you'll burn through in a hurry.
    i'd save that little griots polisher for final pass/swirl removal.
    i've been wet hand sanding with p1200 or p1500, then p2000 and then going to compound on a rotary. this gives me the finish i'm looking for. i'm also experimenting with trizact 1500/3000 but i feel like the hand sanding is a better first pass.
    i replied to your post the other day, but for some reason it didn't show up...
    keep up the good work, you're kind of inspirational. makes me want to get out there and do some more work on my rides
    b marler

  9. #9
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    Mar 2016
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    Quote Originally Posted by bmarler View Post
    that dewalt is a rotary, as is that little air polisher. they just make a circle, not a random pattern. this will give you more cutting power. (and more likely to burn through if you're not careful) always buff "off the panel" with the rotary or you'll burn through in a hurry.
    i'd save that little griots polisher for final pass/swirl removal...
    Thanks guys, that info helps a lot. At first I was definitely going too slow with the polishers.

    I'm found some little 3" wool pads online for about $30 for 5 pads, I'll try those next time for compounding.



    i've been wet hand sanding with p1200 or p1500, then p2000 and then going to compound on a rotary. this gives me the finish i'm looking for. i'm also experimenting with trizact 1500/3000 but i feel like the hand sanding is a better first pass...
    I usually go to 5000 just because, a) I don't know what I am doing and only have you internet folks to ask (THANK GOD!) and b) my projects so far have been pretty small.

    The trunk lid on my Caddy will probably be my biggest attempt yet. Since I am planning some panel art work and I will be BC/CC the trunk prior to the artwork, I think that I will practice compounding/polishing it BEFORE I do the artwork just in case I screw it up.

    I want to be able to get that wet look shine that seems to come out of the gun (when done right) - I just always end up with some type of dirt/dust in my clear as I spray in the Pig Barn.

  10. #10
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    everyone gets dust/crap in the paint. well, maybe dave is an exception. i've had really great results shooting in bad locations. (dirt floor) sometimes you just get lucky. most of us hobbyists have to compromise regarding the painting booth, so we sand and polish. takes more time, but still comes out great.
    b marler

  11. #11
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    Mar 2016
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    Quote Originally Posted by bmarler View Post
    everyone gets dust/crap in the paint. well, maybe dave is an exception. i've had really great results shooting in bad locations. (dirt floor) sometimes you just get lucky. most of us hobbyists have to compromise regarding the painting booth, so we sand and polish. takes more time, but still comes out great.

    Yeah, I fully understand that and prepare for it by planning on wet sanding and polishing every project that I have. Just another checkbox that I need to understand and learn. It maybe a simple process, but like anything else having the correct information sure helps, and that is why I lean on you guys on this forum! Pretty much like everything else, I underestimated what it takes to wetsand/polish. I also know that even just purchasing the correct (or kinda) tools and materials is only part of the answer.

    Thanks again to you and everyone else who has helped - now if I could just find that little air rotary buffer....

  12. #12
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    Feb 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by OldFatBald View Post
    Yeah, I fully understand that and prepare for it by planning on wet sanding and polishing every project that I have. Just another checkbox that I need to understand and learn. It maybe a simple process, but like anything else having the correct information sure helps, and that is why I lean on you guys on this forum! Pretty much like everything else, I underestimated what it takes to wetsand/polish. I also know that even just purchasing the correct (or kinda) tools and materials is only part of the answer.

    Thanks again to you and everyone else who has helped - now if I could just find that little air rotary buffer....
    The pistol grip air polishers are ok for denibbing etc but you want to use a full size rotary for large areas. They have a lot more cut and torque.

  13. #13
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    Mar 2016
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    Quote Originally Posted by xtremekustomz View Post
    The pistol grip air polishers are ok for denibbing etc but you want to use a full size rotary for large areas. They have a lot more cut and torque.
    I got the little pistol air polisher (hope I can find it again!) and the little electric Griot's polisher for doing motorcycle tanks and sub boxes. I bought the Dewalt for buffing out the gel coat on a boat that I had (two boats ago!) and now plan on using the Dewalt for my first bigger than a breadbox project Caddy trunk.

    That Dewalt is listed as a 7"/9" unit and I think the Hook & Loop pad that I have is for 6" pads.

    For larger items (that Caddy trunk is pretty good sized);

    * Is a bigger pad better?

    * Should I use 8" pads?

    * Do 8" pads use a 7" backing plate?

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by OldFatBald View Post
    I got the little pistol air polisher (hope I can find it again!) and the little electric Griot's polisher for doing motorcycle tanks and sub boxes. I bought the Dewalt for buffing out the gel coat on a boat that I had (two boats ago!) and now plan on using the Dewalt for my first bigger than a breadbox project Caddy trunk.

    That Dewalt is listed as a 7"/9" unit and I think the Hook & Loop pad that I have is for 6" pads.

    For larger items (that Caddy trunk is pretty good sized);

    * Is a bigger pad better?

    * Should I use 8" pads?

    * Do 8" pads use a 7" backing plate?
    We use mostly 6" foam pads but I'd recommend that you get both foam and wool so that you can judge which you like best. If you purchase foam I'd recommend the orange pad. We have found that (at this time) our go-to polish is Wizard's Mystic Cut, it's light years ahead of the older brands.


    LINK



    LINK


    The best way we've found to dispense polish or compound is from a 3M squeeze bottle.


  15. #15
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    Mar 2016
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    Quote Originally Posted by OldFatBald View Post
    That Dewalt is listed as a 7"/9" unit and I think the Hook & Loop pad that I have is for 6" pads.

    For larger items (that Caddy trunk is pretty good sized);

    * Is a bigger pad better?

    * Should I use 8" pads?

    * Do 8" pads use a 7" backing plate?
    So I checked my Dewalt and I have a 6" H&L pad and a second 6.5" H&L pad (not sure why??) and a set of 3M perfect-it pads along with some Chemical Brothers 6" foam pads, so I guess that I will just get a 6" wool pad. And be good with that for awhile.

    I read on some of the other posts that people are using a rotary first then following up with a forced rotation smaller 5" unit like the Makita PO5000C.

    When people do this, do they use the rotary with the compounding material and then switch to polishing materials/pads with the PO5000C.

    I have access to a Makita PO5000C so I was thinking of trying the Makita after the Dewalt that I have.

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