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Thread: Do you use a mask when wet sanding?

  1. #1

    Default Do you use a mask when wet sanding?

    Anybody that does this on a regular basis knows that dust can be a relentless enemy. So i wet sand anytime it's an option. But I've noticed, particularly with high build primers, that an odor is present when wet sanding. I know the activators contain Isos, so I'm wondering if this odor is considered "fumes" like when mixing paints.

  2. #2
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    Nov 2005
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by L&LRestoration View Post
    Anybody that does this on a regular basis knows that dust can be a relentless enemy. So i wet sand anytime it's an option. But I've noticed, particularly with high build primers, that an odor is present when wet sanding. I know the activators contain Isos, so I'm wondering if this odor is considered "fumes" like when mixing paints.
    I would think that it's not necessary to use a mask when wet sanding as long as you allow enough time for the primer or paint to cure properly.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
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    8,596

    Default 2 things...

    Quote Originally Posted by L&LRestoration View Post
    Anybody that does this on a regular basis knows that dust can be a relentless enemy. So i wet sand anytime it's an option. But I've noticed, particularly with high build primers, that an odor is present when wet sanding. I know the activators contain Isos, so I'm wondering if this odor is considered "fumes" like when mixing paints.
    I agree with what Len said and you should be safe in wet sanding.

    Thing 2 is, studies and research show there is a very heavy concentration during the mixing process (birth of ISOSYANATES) of hardened paint products and protection must be worn.

    Henry

  4. #4
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    Jul 2016
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    Denver, CO
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    Isocyanates are most harmful before dry, Iso sticks to the hairs on your lungs and your lungs can not clean them off, dust however your lungs can clean off. but it is not good practice to not wear safety equipment.

    wet sanding or not protect yourself

  5. #5

    Default

    I'm not a body/paint guy by trade. However I work in the chemical/large scale pharmaceutical field with prior experience in a nuclear power plant. I have been a HAZMAT tech for 25 plus years.

    This is how I lead my classes about 'do I need a mask?'...'is this chemical, is this compound safe?'. And my responses are always the same.

    "Lead paint was the best thing since individually wrapped cheese at one time. Asbestos at one time was revolutionary. The list of known carcinogens was once very small, but now grows almost daily".

    Asbestos was dangerous when installed and now when removed. Once in place and undisturbed it provides little to no harm. Lead paint the same.

    Wet sanding should be relatively safe without a mask. But you are 'disturbing' a chemical compound.

    From my industry I wear latex or nitrile gloves with almost everything I do, mostly from habit.

    I would think there would be more risk of chemical absorption through the skin when wet sanding without gloves than doing the same without a mask.

    But this is 2018. Things will be different in 2028, 2038.

    Not being the grim reaper. Just a few thoughts.

    Scott

  6. #6
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    Nov 2005
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    lower Michigan
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    Default

    Why would anyone feel a need to wear a mask while wet sanding ?? There is NO DUST in the air when wet sanding so there is nothing in the air to breath in. NO, I don't wear a mask when wet sanding.

  7. #7
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    Nov 2013
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    olympia,wa
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    Default

    agree with phil v.
    in addition, i thought that the coating essentially becomes inert after curing.
    b marler

  8. #8

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    Anytime a chemical compound is altered there is emissions. Odds are 'wet sanding' it would be caught in the water.

    I would not wear a mask either. But I would wear gloves.

    I know the professionals can use their hands as their eyes (I'm not there)

    But there is a lot of potential for absorption thru the skin.

    Once it is in the body, it is in the body.

    Scott

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2018
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    4

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Len View Post
    I would think that it's not necessary to use a mask when wet sanding as long as you allow enough time for the primer or paint to cure properly.
    I agree with you as well. Should be fine if you wait for long enough.

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