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Thread: Quick and Dirty Pulling Dents without a Slide Hammer?

  1. #1

    Default Quick and Dirty Pulling Dents without a Slide Hammer?

    I'm working on my 1930's sheet metal kitchen sink base. The doors are sheet metal and the outer surface is has some deep depressions where it was likely kicked and dented over the years. I'd like to try my hand at a quick & dirty repair to make the door exteriors flat and planer again ... or as close as I can reasonably come with the equipment I have on hand. The door interiors aren't a concern. If I fail, I'll fabricate new doors from wood, which will probably be a lot easier.

    I'd started by using some Bondo filler. However it'll take a ton of filler to fill the depressions in the door, so it looks like I'll need to pull the door out from it's concave condition. I don't own a slide hammer. Is there a way to pop these doors out a little without one? Any makeshift tools that I might have on hand that may be able to get the job done if approached in another manner? I was thinking if I can pop the concavity out a little, I can use Bondo to fill it in, and while not perfect, it would look better than it presently does. Again, quick and dirty, certainly not body shop worthy.

    I have basic metal tools, 4.5" grinder, a couple body hammers, shop tools, etc.

    Some pics attached showing the cabinet, doors, and backs of doors.

    Any ideas?
    Thanks a bunch.DSC07009.jpgDSC06993.jpgDSC06995.jpgDSC07008.jpgDSC06463.jpg

  2. #2

    Default

    Another pic...

    DSC07003.jpg

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    lower Michigan
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    17,214

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lovegasoline View Post
    Another pic...

    DSC07003.jpg
    It's almost a given that the metal in those doors is stretched which would require shrinking the metal in those spots.

    Have you considered finding someone with a box/pan brake and just having new doors fabricated ?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
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    37,843

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    Since it's indoor metal it's not going to be subjected to the same environmental factors as car metal. I'd drill holes in it and pull it out with a Pull-Rod then grind and fill to level the surface.


  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    olympia,wa
    Posts
    387

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    Quote Originally Posted by Phil V View Post
    It's almost a given that the metal in those doors is stretched which would require shrinking the metal in those spots.

    Have you considered finding someone with a box/pan brake and just having new doors fabricated ?
    phil v is right on the money there. just have a sheet metal shop fab those up for you. i bet it's cheaper than you think. then you're painting fresh metal, and they'll come out nicer with almost no effort. just be sure to use the same gauge metal (or thicker), thinner stuff will be hard to keep flat.
    b marler

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