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Thread: spots on outside of glass

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
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    Hiram, Ohio
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    466

    Default spots on outside of glass

    A continuation on my last post regarding some kind of "film" on the 2004 Jeep Grand Cherokee. Under fluorescent lights, there is a film all over this truck that I have determined is more of a ruddy brown than red (last post thought maybe I was buffing red color out of the paint, but now I am sure that is not the case)
    Anyway, the paint buffs out nice, but it's difficult. I don't know what the heck this is. I am doing the big sections with a buffer, and small sections by hand. It's a ton of work, but worth it!
    All the glass has this as well, more on the passenger side, and none on the windshield where the wipers wipe. I have tried windex, vinegar, rubbing compound, 0000 steel wool, laguer thinner, mineral spirits, gasoline. I've tried wetting it with alcohol and using a fresh razor. The razor will get some off, but not all.
    I've had this with other used cars, but I have had success with just a good cleaning with some of the methods above. It's a film, but also looks like water spots with it. Any suggestions? Thanks.
    Mike

  2. #2
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    Nov 2005
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    San Francisco bay area California
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    Default

    I have seen that before where it literally wouldn't come off, I am interested to see what others say.

    Brian
    Touched by an Angel.

  3. #3
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    Nov 2005
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    8,908

    Default Pretty...

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeP View Post
    A continuation on my last post regarding some kind of "film" on the 2004 Jeep Grand Cherokee. Under fluorescent lights, there is a film all over this truck that I have determined is more of a ruddy brown than red (last post thought maybe I was buffing red color out of the paint, but now I am sure that is not the case)
    Anyway, the paint buffs out nice, but it's difficult. I don't know what the heck this is. I am doing the big sections with a buffer, and small sections by hand. It's a ton of work, but worth it!
    All the glass has this as well, more on the passenger side, and none on the windshield where the wipers wipe. I have tried windex, vinegar, rubbing compound, 0000 steel wool, laguer thinner, mineral spirits, gasoline. I've tried wetting it with alcohol and using a fresh razor. The razor will get some off, but not all.
    I've had this with other used cars, but I have had success with just a good cleaning with some of the methods above. It's a film, but also looks like water spots with it. Any suggestions? Thanks.
    That Inferno Red is a pretty color. I forgot when you said this film appeared. It has to be an overspray from somewhere. Try and think where you've parked. Overspray travels from paint spraying of cars and houses or tree people spray my yard and all the trees. They shoot up over 25 feet high in the trees (bugs & ticks). Maybe have a close look at some vehicles where you park the most. May never happen again anyway.

    For the glass, many years ago car guys used AMMONIA as a go to for cleaning glass. You might want to try that.

    Water spots: I never knew what people meant when they talked about (hard water) 'water spots'. Then we built where we are now. The first time I saw water spots on my black new car I actually thought someone threw acid at it. I tried, like you, everything I could think of and nothing worked. Finally, I found out to remove the water spots I put more of the SAME water on the area. Being the same chemical makeup the fresh water loosens the dried spots. One local carwash has the same water I have. On their drive thru wash, at the end, you get a good blast of 'fresh water rinse' because they know their water will spot all the cars going through.

    Like Brian said, keep us posted on this as you would be helping many others and we would like to know. Good luck and glad the paint came back.

    Henry

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
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    Try product called CLR.....on glass only...

    It is awesome for calcium removal, it could work and break those chemical/covalent bonds.....

  5. #5
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    I will try the CLR... As for where it was parked, I have no idea! I just bought the truck, came in from Southern California. Who the heck knows what falls out of the sky out there! It's some kind of chemical or pollution that I have never seen here in Ohio. However, I am just beside myself happy that I have a 2004 grand cherokee (love this car!!) with NO RUST!! Everything rusts in the snowbelt of NE Ohio. Do you have any idea how sick I am of replacing rotted out brake lines?
    Mike

  6. #6
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    Nov 2005
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    Default Stupid...

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeP View Post
    I will try the CLR... As for where it was parked, I have no idea! I just bought the truck, came in from Southern California. Who the heck knows what falls out of the sky out there! It's some kind of chemical or pollution that I have never seen here in Ohio. However, I am just beside myself happy that I have a 2004 grand cherokee (love this car!!) with NO RUST!! Everything rusts in the snowbelt of NE Ohio. Do you have any idea how sick I am of replacing rotted out brake lines?
    Sore subject. Rotted brake and fuel lines. Really, how much more would it cost the car maker to use good stainless steel lines. I've been using copper or plastic tubing on fuel lines. Know how many vehicles get junked because of rotted lines? Many!

    Since you JGC is solid, you may want to get underneath and spray the lines with something like ZERO RUST along with any welded panels that tend to rust first. Getting rid of 'sponge absorbing" things like sand, leaves and other debris along with keep drain and weep holes open are a big help too.

    Henry

  7. #7
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    Nov 2006
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    I've had good luck removing all kinds of contaminates with a clay bar. It can be some work but cleans very well.

    Bob K

  8. #8
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    Nov 2005
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    Have you tried Clay Magic? It comes in two grits and works great for cleaning contaminated surfaces.

    Clay can work on glass or paint but the "fine" clay is best for glass. If nothing else works on the paint I'd probably wet sand with some 1500/2000 grit then polish using compound and a decent rotary buffer.

  9. #9

    Default If push comes to shove

    I tried a clay bar on my windshield and unfortunately it didn't work for my situation. If it doesn't work for you they do make polishing compounds and pads specifically for glass which worked for me. I read that it could be done with a rotary buffer but that just put swirl marks in my glass. Had to use a random orbit to get the swirls out. Polishing glass is a slow process and you must be careful not to overheat it. Good luck.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
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    128

    Default Spots on glass

    For what is worth I was watching a video on cleaning a windshield. The wiped it down with a dry
    Soft cloth, than used 0000 steel wool than a glass cleaner. Claim that it will not scratch and glass will be crystal clear.

  11. #11
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    Aug 2007
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    Default

    Calcium spots.

  12. #12
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    Jan 2006
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    With our body shop I also have a used car buss. and come across a few cars over time with sots on glass. One comes to mind a 2007 Cobalt we used everything and the detail shop worked on it never did clean up so replaced the windsheild. Like the spots are burned in.

  13. #13
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    I've tried everything I can think of. I found a ton of suggestions with a google search. i have one spot about 4" in diameter clean, 4 hours later. I used Barkeeper's Friend and 0000 steel wool. I am thinking it was more the acid in the product and less the steel wool, but I am unsure. Now that I have something that works, I think I can take care of a side window in about 90 minutes. Good grief.
    Mike

  14. #14
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    Sep 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by fresh paint View Post
    Calcium spots.
    I would agree it could be something along this line. A good friend of mine has an 88 IrocZ he has owned for 25 years. a few years back he removed the rear window louver that was on for many years & found the rear glass had the same type marks. almost as if they were etched into the glass. he had to use a special type of polishing to get the marks off & it was very labor intensive as I recall. I'll give him a should out & see if I can find out what he used & I'll post back.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by 68ragtop View Post
    I would agree it could be something along this line. A good friend of mine has an 88 IrocZ he has owned for 25 years. a few years back he removed the rear window louver that was on for many years & found the rear glass had the same type marks. almost as if they were etched into the glass. he had to use a special type of polishing to get the marks off & it was very labor intensive as I recall. I'll give him a should out & see if I can find out what he used & I'll post back.
    I did commercial glass work for years. Bricks and concrete bleeding calcium was a common problem. Bird droppings also. Never really saw a cure for it or a fix for the glass, if it got to bad, it would just be replaced.

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