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Thread: 77 Ford F250

  1. #1

    Default 77 Ford F250

    I've been doing some work on my 77 Ford in preparation to paint it. So far I've been taking out some of the dents and doing some filler work. The more I do I feel like the more I have to do. Anyway, I'm not striving for a show truck, but would just like to straighten up the body a little and stop any rust from forming. I have a few questions for the pros. What is the finest grit you use on the filler before primer. Also what grit do you use to blend between the bare metal back to paint transition? I was thinking I could just rough the paint with 300 grit paper to prep for paint. Lastly, as I remove trim I'm finding more and more dirt on the body. What's the best way to clean this before get to sanding? Thanks so much for any help you can offer.




  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
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    36,149

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    We normally leave our filler with a 180 scratch prior to applying epoxy and filler primers. We feather the paint around the bare metal using 220 or 320 before priming. When sanding our primer or old paint to prep for painting we normally sand with 600. If we have dirt where moldings were removed we will usually hit it lightly with a gray scuff pad to knock off the dirt or just wipe it with a damp sponge before sanding with 600 grit.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
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    San Francisco bay area California
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    Just so you know, that patch panel and those moulding holes you filled, those WILL be seen after it's painted. If are ok with this, it's cool, I understand our different expectations believe me, I am good with this. But I just wanted you to know that if you want it better you need to strip the paint out further and spread the filler out further to get a smoother transition.

    All of your filler looks high, on the drivers door too, it looks high. The edges should have a more "transparent" look which would show that the transition from the center of the filler to the metal is much more gradual. Of course this is something you feel, but you can also see it in that there is no "transparent" look at the edges.


    Brian
    Touched by an Angel.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
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    106

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    Quote Originally Posted by MARTINSR View Post
    Just so you know, that patch panel and those moulding holes you filled, those WILL be seen after it's painted. If are ok with this, it's cool, I understand our different expectations believe me, I am good with this. But I just wanted you to know that if you want it better you need to strip the paint out further and spread the filler out further to get a smoother transition.

    All of your filler looks high, on the drivers door too, it looks high. The edges should have a more "transparent" look which would show that the transition from the center of the filler to the metal is much more gradual. Of course this is something you feel, but you can also see it in that there is no "transparent" look at the edges...

    Sorry to jump in with a rookie question here, but would this be the point of using guide coat and a long block sander, then some epoxy, then some HB primer? Followed by more block sanding? I'm just asking because I have only done small projects and want to find some new larger project to move onto.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    San Francisco bay area California
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    20,414

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    Quote Originally Posted by OldFatBald View Post
    Sorry to jump in with a rookie question here, but would this be the point of using guide coat and a long block sander, then some epoxy, then some HB primer? Followed by more block sanding? I'm just asking because I have only done small projects and want to find some new larger project to move onto.
    Personally I am not a guidecoat guy, there are places for it but getting body work flat, nope, that's what my eyes and hands are for.

    But here it is in a nut shell, you never want to ask your primer to do too much. You want the filler to be flat and feathered out nice so the primer is only there to fill sand scratches and VERY minor imperfections. Asking it to do too much is asking for trouble, you have to apply more, a greater chance of shrinkage, paint dieback because of the trapped solvents under it, etc.

    Lots of guys use guidecoat on filler, it's all good, I just don't. As a newbe it may help, but my eyes and my hands are what I use. Looking at those photos, I am not kidding you, I am "feeling" it with my eyes! I would bet a crisp $100 bill that I could tell you where the high spots are before feeling it. But I have been doing this for years feeling my mistakes and seeing what they look like.

    Brian
    Touched by an Angel.

  6. #6

    Default

    Thanks for the replies. Martinsr I was wondering if I shouldn't allow a greater transition, and possibly just remove the paint between all of the trim holes I welded up. I'm not done feathering the edges, but I'm glad you made the comments because I was thinking the same thing you said.

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