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Thread: Tips on spraying metallic silver

  1. #1
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    Default Tips on spraying metallic silver

    Hey everyone,
    I will be spraying my car soon. Color is a metallic silver. I am block sanding to 600 and applying a sealer coat right before the base. Base is PPG shopline plus. I have been trying to research online. Car will be painted in a booth with the car fully assembled.

    Seems like I should concentrate very hard to keep the same distance and speed and try to vary where the overlaps occur.

    I've read that I want to avoid too heavy of coats so the flakes don't float on the panel.

    Do I want to use the exact reducer for the actual temp, or use one step slower? What about a 'drop coat' at the end?

    Should I spray the last coat at a 90* angle to the other coats?

    Any other tips?

    Thanks

  2. #2
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    Silver can be tricky especially if you're using a low cost paint. Don't worry too much about getting the color on smooth and glossy, that comes with the clear coat. Apply your first coat of color and allow it to dry to the touch before applying your second and third. If you get dark and light spots then apply a drop coat which is a light dusting for your last coat after the previous coat dries a little.

    The reducer should be what is recommended by the paint manufacturer for the temperature while spraying.
    Last edited by Len; 06-02-2017 at 06:22 AM.

  3. #3
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    I believe shop line plus, is the same as omni plus. fantastic Base coat in my opinion.
    The coverage has always been perfect for me. assuming its the same....

    I used PPG DBU & DBC before trying omni plus & never had a reason to go back. Unless it was a color match issue Like Len mentioned, the top shelf paints will often be a better color match & silvers can be difficult. When I sprayed my 68 GTO I ended up using Global because it was the only line that was the dead on correct color.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by 68ragtop View Post
    I believe shop line plus, is the same as omni plus. fantastic Base coat in my opinion.
    The coverage has always been perfect for me. assuming its the same....

    I used PPG DBU & DBC before trying omni plus & never had a reason to go back. Unless it was a color match issue Like Len mentioned, the top shelf paints will often be a better color match & silvers can be difficult. When I sprayed my 68 GTO I ended up using Global because it was the only line that was the dead on correct color.
    I don't see match as much of a problem as coverage and working characteristics. All paint products can either match or not because many car manufacturers have variations of the same color. If you have a paint code it may match or not based on which variation you have of that color.

    My biggest problem with some paint products is that some have more of a tendency for the metallic particles to sink where the paint is applied more wet usually causing a darker area. This characteristic can demand one or more "drop coats" in order to make the color more consistent.

  5. #5
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    I'm assuming I should do a drop coat? Is this just a coat sprayed from much farther away from the panel? How far and what is the procedure? Does it matter if this gives a much more dry coat before the clear?

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by fusion_ View Post
    I'm assuming I should do a drop coat? Is this just a coat sprayed from much farther away from the panel? How far and what is the procedure? Does it matter if this gives a much more dry coat before the clear?
    A "drop coat" is like dusting the paint on. You allow your last coat to dry a little then hold the gun further away move it more quickly so that your droplets lay on top and are not too wet. This allows the metallic to NOT sink in the resin and it evens out the color. You may need two or three drop coats if you have significant modeling but the down side is that applying the drop coat too dry and/or too many coats could cause poor adhesion between your clear and your color. LINK

  7. #7
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    Default Well...

    Quote Originally Posted by fusion_ View Post
    I'm assuming I should do a drop coat? Is this just a coat sprayed from much farther away from the panel? How far and what is the procedure? Does it matter if this gives a much more dry coat before the clear?
    Len has explained the concept and I'll only add, the idea is to develop your spraying technique by properly spraying paints with metallic. Apply your first coat and look closely at it as it dries. Notice where you are light and where your overlap is much more. Don't rush and keep a good distance so you can see what you're applying. DO NOT hit a wet area to try and correct something but rather wait for the next coat and cover what you need to. Your gun, air pressure, movement and material sort of dictate your outcome.

    Good thing we have the option of a 'drop coat' but remember, if you've 'tiger striped' the panel, a drop coat most likely won't help you.

    Just approach the project KNOWING you can do it and that's that.

    Henry

    You asked about 90* spraying. I never liked doing that and never found it to help in any way. Just take your time, know where you're going with the gun, NEVER stop with the trigger pulled. Some guys on here are professional production painters. They have a proper gun(s), air, material and most important, they have EXPERIENCE. They are like someone who can juggle 6 balls while we would have to go slow with 2 or 3. Slow down so you can see the flow of the metallic. I'm concerned that you're getting too nervous about this and you really shouldn't be. Just be cautious.

  8. #8

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    Fusion--- I have only painted 5 cars and they have won many trophy's at local shows---my reason for telling you this is Len and the other people on this site are the reason why my cars come out so good and you are asking questions at the right place to the right people. One of the cars I completed was a 72 Nova that I painted "Cortez Silver" a metallic original GM color. Len's advice was right on and it worked perfectly for me. Let the first coat dry longer than the flash window, then the subsequent coats are applied normally, be sure to use the same speed and distance. Then this is the most important thing------The last coat should be a drop coat as the guys call it---hold the gun a little further away than the previous coats and perhaps move it a little slower. That will give you a beautifully blended finish. I hope this will help you. It is a tough color to put on but you can do it!! Good Luck.

  9. #9
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    Hello, I'm new to the forum, painting in norcal....
    and this is an old thread, but it's what lead me here. I could start a new thread if that makes more sense.

    I have very limited experience but am learning to shoot using a tekna prolite w/te10.
    So far I've done bumpers and hoods on a black mustang, and a grand marquis with silver metallic.

    The bumpers on both vehicles came out pretty nice tbh.
    The silver metallic on the hood was much more difficult than the black to get the base to lay evenly and I'm wondering if I've done all I can do right now and just shoot the clear tomorrow.

    There is a little of uneveness (looks slightly lighter maybe a foot long by a few inches wide) at the middle of the hood that you can mostly see if you lower your head to hood height. I painted from windshield to front and then did a crosshatch pattern that I read about here. No matter what the lighter spot was hard to cover.
    I did a drop coat before it got below 60 degrees this evening that improved the evenness.
    Right now I've got 3 coats plus a drop coat on there.

    Gun details: devilbiss tekna prolite te10 with 1.3 for base 1.4 for clear, 25-29 psi depending on how the flow is looking for base
    Compressor is weak at 8.8 cfm, but supposed to be enough for the te10
    Paint is PPG Omni, I have med and fast reducers.
    Clear is Southern PU, Universal
    distance from surface while spraying I am about thumb tip to pinky tip

    Should I try another drop coat tomorrow without scuffing or just move onto the clear?
    Any tips in gun adjustment or technique for the clear for this massively large hood ?
    TIA

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by navi View Post
    Hello, I'm new to the forum, painting in norcal....
    and this is an old thread, but it's what lead me here. I could start a new thread if that makes more sense.

    I have very limited experience but am learning to shoot using a tekna prolite w/te10.
    So far I've done bumpers and hoods on a black mustang, and a grand marquis with silver metallic.

    The bumpers on both vehicles came out pretty nice tbh.
    The silver metallic on the hood was much more difficult than the black to get the base to lay evenly and I'm wondering if I've done all I can do right now and just shoot the clear tomorrow.

    There is a little of uneveness (looks slightly lighter maybe a foot long by a few inches wide) at the middle of the hood that you can mostly see if you lower your head to hood height. I painted from windshield to front and then did a crosshatch pattern that I read about here. No matter what the lighter spot was hard to cover.
    I did a drop coat before it got below 60 degrees this evening that improved the evenness.
    Right now I've got 3 coats plus a drop coat on there.

    Gun details: devilbiss tekna prolite te10 with 1.3 for base 1.4 for clear, 25-29 psi depending on how the flow is looking for base
    Compressor is weak at 8.8 cfm, but supposed to be enough for the te10
    Paint is PPG Omni, I have med and fast reducers.
    Clear is Southern PU, Universal
    distance from surface while spraying I am about thumb tip to pinky tip

    Should I try another drop coat tomorrow without scuffing or just move onto the clear? TIA
    You're fighting an uphill battle with an air compressor that puts out 8.8 cfm and shooting Omni paint (big difference between Omni and Omni Plus).
    How big is your air compressor tank ? If it's 60 gallon then you should be fine shooting a hood and a couple other panels. If it's smaller than 60 gallon then your uphill battle just got steeper. Without knowing how you have the spray gun set it's hard to give you good advice without actually being there and knowing what the whole set up is. You're not dealing with one or two alternatives but many alternatives that can and will dictate the outcome of your paint job. I never bad mouth different brands of paints but regular PPG Omni metallic basecoats are JUNK. I won't allow them in my shop and that's the voice of experience speaking. They don't cover well at all (I mean really bad covering). I've seen where it took 8 coats to get the right coverage (where you can't see through the paint). On the other hand Omni Plus/Shopline Plus have been great for me. Good coverage, good color matches. Not a bad thing to say about Omni Plus/Shopline Plus and they cost about half as much as PPG's high end DBC. Silver metallic can be hard to work with using the high end basecoats and you using Omni base silver metallic makes your job even harder. I know this isn't what you want to hear but it is what you need to hear.

    to everyone reading this -- drop coats if done wrong can lead you into an even bigger mess. Depending on the paint you're using, dusting on a "drop coat" can melt when you spray the clear and leave the metallic paint blotchy.

  11. #11
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    Feb 2020
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    Quote Originally Posted by Phil V View Post
    You're fighting an uphill battle with an air compressor that puts out 8.8 cfm and shooting Omni paint (big difference between Omni and Omni Plus).
    How big is your air compressor tank ? If it's 60 gallon then you should be fine shooting a hood and a couple other panels. If it's smaller than 60 gallon then your uphill battle just got steeper. Without knowing how you have the spray gun set it's hard to give you good advice without actually being there and knowing what the whole set up is. You're not dealing with one or two alternatives but many alternatives that can and will dictate the outcome of your paint job. I never bad mouth different brands of paints but regular PPG Omni metallic basecoats are JUNK. I won't allow them in my shop and that's the voice of experience speaking. They don't cover well at all (I mean really bad covering). I've seen where it took 8 coats to get the right coverage (where you can't see through the paint). On the other hand Omni Plus/Shopline Plus have been great for me. Good coverage, good color matches. Not a bad thing to say about Omni Plus/Shopline Plus and they cost about half as much as PPG's high end DBC. Silver metallic can be hard to work with using the high end basecoats and you using Omni base silver metallic makes your job even harder. I know this isn't what you want to hear but it is what you need to hear.

    to everyone reading this -- drop coats if done wrong can lead you into an even bigger mess. Depending on the paint you're using, dusting on a "drop coat" can melt when you spray the clear and leave the metallic paint blotchy.

    thanks for the info.
    the tank is 30 gallon, and when it's full I can finish one coat before the compressor kicks in.
    According to the gauge at the gun, the pressure doesn't change from 29 psi before or after the coat is laid down, or during practice sprays.

    The tekna gun calls for with the te10 cap 7.5 cfm, so yeah I'm near cfm limit for this gun and don't want to spend a couple thousand on better air yet. I would have upgrade to a 220v outlet and buy a 5hp compressor, and I think my compressor is the best I'm going to find at 110v.
    At least it was enough air to get the bumpers looking even and glassy.
    I think my technique on the hood might be lacking, and of course, my sub par paint.

    I'm thinking its a no go on another drop coat then.
    So, if the coverage just doesn't look good enough to clear it, then the plan would be to wet sand with 600 and recoat the base. Or if I switch paint then should I sand more aggressively?
    It's this stuff Omni LV MBPX and it's about $100 a pint
    Any other good options besides Omni Plus for silver metallic?

  12. #12
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    Feb 2020
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    more setup detail on the gun shooting base, I have the air full open, the fluid is 2 turns in from full open,
    and the fan is 1.5 turns in from full open (9 inch oval shape)

  13. #13
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    Why not just shoot some clear on your hood? That way, after it dries you can take it outside and see your results in the sun.

    If you have to redo it, The clear is easy enough to sand 600/800.

    When I first did my trunk lid (also in Nor Cal) it took me three times to not get tiger striping. I ended up having to pull my gun back a little further then I was used to.

    If you don’t want to use Omni, I love shooting PPG Envirobase but it is pricey. It is waterbourne and the flash time between coats is like two minutes, then use your regular clear.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by OldFatBald View Post
    Why not just shoot some clear on your hood? That way, after it dries you can take it outside and see your results in the sun.

    If you have to redo it, The clear is easy enough to sand 600/800.

    When I first did my trunk lid (also in Nor Cal) it took me three times to not get tiger striping. I ended up having to pull my gun back a little further then I was used to.

    If you donít want to use Omni, I love shooting PPG Envirobase but it is pricey. It is waterbourne and the flash time between coats is like two minutes, then use your regular clear.

    I decided to go ahead and shoot the clear since I had so many hours in might as well see what it looks like
    I thought it came out pretty good
    Attached Images Attached Images

  15. #15
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    [QUOTE=navi;390512]I decided to go ahead and shoot the clear since I had so many hours in might as well see what it looks like
    I thought it came out pretty good[/QUOT

    With that amount of orange peel it might have been better to use your 1.3 tip, but I have never used a tekna prolite te10 . How many coats of clear? As long as you have plenty of clear applied where you can get most of the orange peel out you may be good to go. After getting the clear flat and buffed you will know if any problems still exist in your bc.

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