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Thread: Gloss Acrylic Lacquer

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    89

    Default Gloss Acrylic Lacquer

    I will be using acrylic lacquer to paint my truck cab interior. It's a satin/low sheen finish. The steering wheel, however, needs to be gloss. I thought I read somewhere on how to get a glossy finish with lacquer. Something about over-thinning?

    The data sheet has a clear coat method detailed. I'd like to be able to use what I have now without having to buy more material for such a small area to paint.

    I don't want to try buffing it as I'm sure I would cut through the color on the sharp edges of the wheel.

    The specific paint I have is TCP Global:
    Restoration Shop (TCP Global) Lacquer1.jpg
    Restoration Shop (TCP Global) Lacquer2.jpg

    Thanks!

  2. #2

    Default

    Without polishing, lacquer will never have a gloss to it unless an an enamel clear designed for use over it is used. It's just the nature of the paint. If I were concerned about polishing on a small area such as a steering wheel, I would polish by hand. With lacquer, it's not that difficult.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    34,451

    Default

    Good info from FBH. I've used that product and found that over thinning can produce a smoother (less orange peel) but it still isn't real glossy. Over-reducing can help eliminate the need for sanding and you may get the gloss you want by just hand rubbing. Depending on the type of thinner and the way the lacquer is applied, it can take weeks of warmth for the finish to release all of the solvent and polishing before all the solvent is out can cause the finish to dull later. Lacquer is a "trapped solvent" type of finish which means the surface dries trapping the solvent under it and the heavier the paint is applied the longer it takes for the solvent to escape.

  4. #4

    Default

    The clear listed in the tech sheet is just a lacquer clear and will require polishing to achieve a gloss finish. If it's a metallic color, I would recommend it, not necessary with a solid color.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    89

    Default

    Thanks guys.

    I also recently saw a couple of comments that a slower, "high quality" thinner would give a glossier finish. How's that sound to you guys?

    As far as hand polishing, I was in my urethane mode and I guess I was thinking that I would be sanding the lacquer first. I realize now that hand rubbing will get the results I need for the best gloss. I can remember back in the day of "20 coat" lacquer paint jobs as the norm for custom work. While I don't think I would be applying that many coats, if I get it thick enough, I shouldn't have to worry about rubbing through if I am careful. Just be patient with the flash times and I think I will be OK.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    olympia,wa
    Posts
    157

    Default


    yes, in my experience, slow thinner will achieve better gloss. but, you still need to rub it for it to look correct. and yes, be mindful of flash time, and coats per session so the solvents escape properly. those 20 coat paint jobs weren't done in one painting session.
    b marler

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