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Thread: How to change your own tires by hand

  1. #1
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    Default How to change your own tires by hand

    This is a five minute vid, but my friend actually pulled this task off in three and a half minutes flat, while talking... The rest was just talking and joking around, along with a quick "tutorial 101" in the first minute.

    "It's all about the drop center... that's the whole trick.."

    But it was still impressive! No power tools either... just a hammer and a couple crowbars...

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tRAS...#gpluscomments

  2. #2
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    Nov 2005
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    Default Cool...

    I remember you showing that video a couple -three years ago. Of course, that's what we would call "normal tire" unlike 17 to 20 inch plus rims of today with very small sidewall. Was that you talking?

    That tire did come off a little easier than reality of rubber from the bead gluing itself to the rim which can be a bear to break. Probably easier because he had that one on and off a couple times.

    Also, a few interesting videos following the one you posted.

    I've changed more tires than I even care to remember when I was 16 - 17. You haven't changed a tire till you mounted a Goodyear Double-Eagle tire of the '60's. Those tires had a tire within a tire in case of flats. Trick was you had to put the inner tire inside of the street tire and balance it first before sealing the bead of the outer tire.

    Thanks for sharing that.

    Henry

  3. #3
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    Default

    when i was younger, i had some slotted mags that were too wide for the tire guys to handle. the only way was to do it myself. that lug wrench was called a tire iron for a reason you know. those big ol mickey thompsons were awesome!
    b marler

  4. #4

    Default

    Reminds me of my motorcycle days when I changed my own tires.
    Pretty much the same procedure. They were tough.

  5. #5
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Henry View Post
    I remember you showing that video a couple -three years ago. Of course, that's what we would call "normal tire" unlike 17 to 20 inch plus rims of today with very small sidewall. Was that you talking?

    That tire did come off a little easier than reality of rubber from the bead gluing itself to the rim which can be a bear to break. Probably easier because he had that one on and off a couple times.

    Also, a few interesting videos following the one you posted.

    I've changed more tires than I even care to remember when I was 16 - 17. You haven't changed a tire till you mounted a Goodyear Double-Eagle tire of the '60's. Those tires had a tire within a tire in case of flats. Trick was you had to put the inner tire inside of the street tire and balance it first before sealing the bead of the outer tire.

    Thanks for sharing that.

    Henry
    That was a spare tire that sat under the truck for years Henry.. Unknown how many years.. The tire was old and it was getting cracks on the sidewall, so he was just putting the other tire onto the spare rim.

    Frank made it look easy, but that used to be his trade. He used to be the guy that would go out to jobsites and change tires on trucks and forklifts etc.. sometimes, without even removing the wheel.

  6. #6
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    Default

    when i was a teenager a lot of us had to learn how to do that. it was fun when you was changing a tube type tire and you found that you had pinched the tube. i want to see him do that with a nice mag wheel without denting or scratching it. another way of breaking the bead is to put the tire and wheel under the bumper and use a bumper jack on top of the tire to break the bead. he should have shown us how to pump up the tire with a hand pump to make the redneck video complete.

  7. #7
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    Default It's not a competition

    Quote Originally Posted by easymoney View Post
    when i was a teenager a lot of us had to learn how to do that. it was fun when you was changing a tube type tire and you found that you had pinched the tube. i want to see him do that with a nice mag wheel without denting or scratching it. another way of breaking the bead is to put the tire and wheel under the bumper and use a bumper jack on top of the tire to break the bead. he should have shown us how to pump up the tire with a hand pump to make the redneck video complete.
    There are a lot of comments like this on the vid. You all want to be critics..

    I just thought it was awesome, that's why I filmed it and shared it.

    i want to see him do that with a nice mag wheel without denting or scratching it.
    That question was answered in the comments already. Someone asked about low profile tires and rims... They make wedges for that, but yeah, scratching the rim is a big consideration.

  8. #8
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    Nov 2005
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    Default Say what?

    [QUOTE=easymoney;317812]when i was a teenager a lot of us had to learn how to do that. it was fun when you was changing a tube type tire and you found that you had pinched the tube. i want to see him do that with a nice mag wheel without denting or scratching it.

    another way of breaking the bead is to put the tire and wheel under the bumper and use a bumper jack on top of the tire to break the bead[QUOTE]

    I hope you're not serious. Have YOU done that? What type of jack and what do you do when you start lifting the vehicle and who jumps first when the bead breaks and things start to drop instantly and can you do that on a rubber bumper cover as well?

    he should have shown us how to pump up the tire with a hand pump to make the redneck video complete.
    Now that's about downright rude of a comment. It was a good video. No one forced you to watch it. If you looked deeper into the video you would see a little bit of the law of physics at work. Show us some of your videos when "you was" changing a tube.

    Thanks for sharing Jim2.

    Henry

  9. #9
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    Nov 2006
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    Default

    I hope you're not serious. Have YOU done that?

    Henry[/QUOTE]

    I used to do that Henry. I used a high lift jack and slid the tire under my pickup so that the rim was just under my hitch. I set the jack on the tire so that the edge of the foot was next to the edge of the rim. A few strokes of the jack start pushing the tire off the rim before the truck moves more than 2 or 3 inches. The bead slowly slides down and the truck doesn't fall. On very difficult rims I would reposition the wheel so I could loosen up the bead in three spots. Never a problem , but time consuming to get everything set up. I bought a bead breaker about 20 years ago and used that for quite a while. It's a 20 pound slide hammer with a foot that's designed with a curved end to fit the curve of the rim and it's got a bit of bend so that is slips under the rim edge and stays in contact with the bead.

    Now that I'm retired I just drive to Discount Tire and they do all that for me and don't charge me either. (Just had 2 bead leaks fixed last week.) The only down side is I get in line behind all the other people with tire trouble. When I was working I didn't have time for that. I could get the tire off and back on in less time that it took to even drive to the tire shop.

    A little history: in the summer after high school and before I started college I took a job at a local service station where they promptly made me the tire man. Low man on the totem pole got all the dirty jobs but I soon learned how easy it was.

    Bob K

  10. #10
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    Default beading them up.

    I too have changed tires by hand many times . I have a warning about beading them up. When running low pressure paddle tires out in the sand dunes, they can come un beaded pretty easy. then what do you do ? Well most folks spray some ether inside the tire and toss a match in and WHOOMP instant bead up. it works but take the valve core out first. So watching a friend battle with a 10.5 x 31.5 x 15 tire that was as old as they come, he had just hand changed it to a different rim, I watched for as long as I could stand, and said spray some ether in side the unbeaded tire and toss in a match, Ive done it and seen it done countless time.. He sprays in the ether and tosses in a match. J-BLAMM the tire explodes sending rubber shrapnel everywhere and that 50# cannonball launches it self about 15 in the air , landing about 10 feet away on the opposite side. scared the hell out of us. don't do it with old sun rotted tires.

  11. #11
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    Default

    obviously he used too much either. i have wondered about using acetylene from a acetylene torch. just put in a little acetylene and oxygen mixture just do not use much until you find out how much would do the job without blowing yourself up.

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