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Thread: Structure repair using Jacko?

  1. #1
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    Default Structure repair using Jacko?

    How well does a pulling system like this work? Could I use this for pulling over a light front sway or pulling out a slightly pushed in door opening? Or are they more trouble than they are worth? Although at the price it doesn't take much work to make it cover it's own cost. Just paid $450 to have a front sway pulled over.

    JackoPuller

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    Jeremy
    Avid collector of rust!

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by junk View Post
    How well does a pulling system like this work? Could I use this for pulling over a light front sway or pulling out a slightly pushed in door opening? Or are they more trouble than they are worth? Although at the price it doesn't take much work to make it cover it's own cost. Just paid $450 to have a front sway pulled over.

    JackoPuller

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    Jeremy
    Those are best used for pulling sheet metal, not frames or frame sways.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Phil V View Post
    Those are best used for pulling sheet metal, not frames or frame sways.
    Where have you been Phil? Before large frame racks this Jackco type dozer was all that we used for pulling out frames and heavy T-bone hits. As long as it's hooked up properly it does an excellent job on medium impact hits and it doesn't need floor anchors. We've sold several of them for these types of pulls and always get positive feedback. Until you can afford the money and the space for a frame RACK this is one of the best ways to go.

  4. #4
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    If you don't mind installing a dozen or more floor anchors the a Pull Post is also a good tool for pulling frames and T-bone hits.




  5. #5
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    I used dozers and power posts for many years in the body shops and my experience is they are good for pulling sheet metal and VERY light frame work. Any serious frame work needs to be done on a dedicated commercial frame rack. Towards the end we farmed out all our framework with the exception of the light hits that were an easy fix. The power posts from my experience worked better than the dozers. I remember bending a dozer trying to pull a frigging Chevy Vega frame (of all cars !). I farmed out all my frame work for the last 25 years to a shop owned by a buddy of mine who had a full featured frame rack. Those dozers and power posts worked OK on light hits but even those are different than what we face today. Those older vehicles had mounting holes that were plus or minus up to a full half inch for fine tuning a panel. These newer vehicles are not like that any more. Either they fit dead nuts on or they don't fit all. In other words if you have a bolt a fender or a core support to a fender apron if the mounting holes don't line up exactly then the mounting bolts won't won't go into the bolt holes. No slots in the metal/bolt holes for adjusting the fit. Things are different now than what they used to be. I still have and use my porta powers but I don't mess with frame work any more other than the very light hits.

    It's hard to find a good anchor point with the dozers especially. You can do more damage than good if you use a bad anchor spot or you can't find a good anchor point. Front end sways with a dozer are almost impossible. The power posts work OK for light hits if you have enough pots in the floor in strategic areas. These newer vehicles need to go on a lazer frame rack.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Phil V View Post
    I used dozers and power posts for many years in the body shops and my experience is they are good for pulling sheet metal and VERY light frame work. Any serious frame work needs to be done on a dedicated commercial frame rack. Towards the end we farmed out all our framework with the exception of the light hits that were an easy fix. The power posts from my experience worked better than the dozers. I remember bending a dozer trying to pull a frigging Chevy Vega frame (of all cars !). I farmed out all my frame work for the last 25 years to a shop owned by a buddy of mine who had a full featured frame rack. Those dozers and power posts worked OK on light hits but even those are different than what we face today. Those older vehicles had mounting holes that were plus or minus up to a full half inch for fine tuning a panel. These newer vehicles are not like that any more. Either they fit dead nuts on or they don't fit all. In other words if you have a bolt a fender or a core support to a fender apron if the mounting holes don't line up exactly then the mounting bolts won't won't go into the bolt holes. No slots in the metal/bolt holes for adjusting the fit. Things are different now than what they used to be. I still have and use my porta powers but I don't mess with frame work any more other than the very light hits.

    It's hard to find a good anchor point with the dozers especially. You can do more damage than good if you use a bad anchor spot or you can't find a good anchor point. Front end sways with a dozer are almost impossible. The power posts work OK for light hits if you have enough pots in the floor in strategic areas. These newer vehicles need to go on a lazer frame rack.
    You are right for the most part and for the avg body man. I was raised in a Europe repair shop and my uncle had benches before guys knew what the hell they were. point is all the heavy hit were repaired on big racks or bench but some of the real craftsmen could fix any damage with a " Blackhawk Dozer " slow but correct. just my 2 cents

  7. #7
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    Back before pull posts and frame machines we used our dozer for all our hard pulls. Frames, posts or accordion sheetmetal were all pulled with the dozer. When the first unibody got hit we used rocker clamps to anchor the pull and get the correct angle.

    We are now spoiled by having a lot of pots in the floor and a pull post but the dozer served us well for many years.

  8. #8
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    To Len ,Phil, Martin ,Henry and all of the " older guys " how did we ever repair these cars and trucks without cell phones...............LOL

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by tommie.b View Post
    To Len ,Phil, Martin ,Henry and all of the " older guys " how did we ever repair these cars and trucks without cell phones...............LOL
    Yep, "Pull post" style was what we were using. But the second real shop I went to work at in 79 had a real frame rack. So that's what I saw from then on.

    Brian
    Touched by an Angel.

  10. #10
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    Default Well...

    Quote Originally Posted by tommie.b View Post
    To Len ,Phil, Martin ,Henry and all of the " older guys " how did we ever repair these cars and trucks without cell phones...............LOL
    Quicker and uninterrupted!

    Henry

    You know, my uncle Jimmy now 99 still owns his welding shop. Was still going there every day for a couple hours until 96. He never had a phone. People asked for years, how come you don't have a phone?

    He said, when I can weld on a phone, I'll have one.

    Henry

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Henry View Post
    Quicker and uninterrupted!

    Henry

    You know, my uncle Jimmy now 99 still owns his welding shop. Was still going there every day for a couple hours until 96. He never had a phone. People asked for years, how come you don't have a phone?

    He said, when I can weld on a phone, I'll have one.

    Henry
    Wait Henry let me check that on my phone funny

  12. #12
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    Looks like I have a candidate for a Jacko system. Now I just have to decide if I want to tackle it or haul it to a shop. The rails are swayed over VS being collapsed. Also there is a subframe under this that holds the engine and suspension bits that I plan to replace. I've watched too many Arthur Tussik videos on Youtube and am probably over confident about getting this back into shape. Car is a 2017 subaru outback.

    IMG_8818.jpgIMG_8819.jpg
    Avid collector of rust!

  13. #13
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    A lot of people made/make their own "dozer" or scissor jack. Get a piece of I-beam and some thick wall rectangular tubing. If you're a good welder or know a good welder it's not that hard to make one. Pick up a ten ton hydraulic ram and an air over hydraulic pump, some good chain and you're good to go. ORrrr just take it to real frame shop and have it done right. I have used professionally many different Dozers, scissor jack, blackhawk power posts and they are good for light hits. NO serious frame straightening. Pay a professional with a dedicated frame rack to do it right -- (my recommendation).

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