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Thread: home made custom cruiser bike

  1. #1

    Default home made custom cruiser bike

    laying it out on the floor to get the shape and cutting angles for the notcher





    since the donor neck piece is thicker than the parts that will be marked on the floor, I will have to weld this on when it's mounted to the frame jig, along with the chain stay, seat stay, and bottom bracket



    the bottom pieces are finaled but still figuring where to put the main top tube and getting rake and all that.


  2. #2

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    not thrilled with these first welds. This was with my 110. I later got a 220 and the welds are much smoother. I also improved technique at that point, but here, they're not very good.





    I had to stop all work at that point and made a frame jig in order to make sure everything was straight.


  3. #3

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    bottom bracket tacked to the support tube as well as some added sheet metal for design.



    changed the pitch of the donor seat/chain stay to fit the bike. This was the best I could match the other weld next to it. Close enough



    tig welds still a little ugly but am improving technique. The main problem was contaminants and being comfy going in a circle.



    at this point, I thought I was done but after doing a test ride I realized the bottom bracket wasn't stout enough. I needed another brace.


  4. #4

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    the welds got better right off the bat with the 220





    say what you will about Eastwood, I had the 110 Tig out of warranty and because I called and said the non adjustable 8 second post flow wasted gas, they gladly exchange it with a new 220 and all I had to do was pay the price difference. It also comes with the standard warranty. the welding cart was also stretched to accommodate both welders and two tanks. Rattle can blue hid the evidence.


  5. #5

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    what's a cruiser without a rear fender?

    a buck is a must if you want your metal to be straight



    tucking forks or stump shrinking is also a must for deep compound curves created by the roundness of the wheel



    more stretch in the center or more shrink at the edges. The buck determines which way to go.


  6. #6

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    starting to take shape. This is not an easy fender for me. I decided to break up the center into two pieces to make it a little easier.



    getting there but really rough need to wheel it smooth



    a donut dolly was helpful for a stubborn stretched area that was in the middle of the panel. Weird concept but works great!




  7. #7

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    I'm not good enough to do all the metal work up front. It's much easier to tack here and there and do more planishing. It just makes sense.



    all done and ready for a skim coat or two...or 3...4...5...6



    looks good, but still need to do the brackets, which isn't fun.


  8. #8

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    home made headlight








  9. #9

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    I was excited to see this work. It only took about 20 hours. haahhahaha
    Sad part is, I still need to file here and there around the edges before skim coating it.


  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Hawaii
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    22,626

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by surfin View Post
    ...




    tucking forks or stump shrinking is also a must for deep compound curves created by the roundness of the wheel



    more stretch in the center or more shrink at the edges. The buck determines which way to go.

    Cool Project! Can you tell more about how you got from the first pic to the second one?

  11. #11

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    yes, the angle gauge is actually on the wrong side in the pic. It should be against both tubes as they sit. Then I use that to ensure the same angle applies to the tube in the notcher and the wall of the hole saw bit. Sometimes that angle can be different depending on which side of the cut leaves more meat, or shall I say you have to consider it the direction it moves in the notcher. I can't think of the number but I think it can be the difference of 45 degrees, I have it written on my notcher. I'm terrible at explaining it, but the main thing is to get your angle and try to use it but pay attention to which side leaves more meat cause it could mean cutting it at a different angle. It took me a couple tubes to figure it out. ahhaha

    EDIT: when you consider which way the notcher allows the tube to turn for your angle dictates where you have the gauge. In other words, it has to be in same direction as intended by the cut, if that makes sense. In this case, the notcher is a few degrees inaccurate and have had better luck just putting the gauge up to the wall of the saw bit and tube.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Hawaii
    Posts
    22,626

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by surfin View Post
    yes, the angle gauge is actually on the wrong side in the pic. It should be against both tubes as they sit. Then I use that to ensure the same angle applies to the tube in the notcher and the wall of the hole saw bit. Sometimes that angle can be different depending on which side of the cut leaves more meat, or shall I say you have to consider it the direction it moves in the notcher. I can't think of the number but I think it can be the difference of 45 degrees, I have it written on my notcher. I'm terrible at explaining it, but the main thing is to get your angle and try to use it but pay attention to which side leaves more meat cause it could mean cutting it at a different angle. It took me a couple tubes to figure it out. ahhaha

    EDIT: when you consider which way the notcher allows the tube to turn for your angle dictates where you have the gauge. In other words, it has to be in same direction as intended by the cut, if that makes sense. In this case, the notcher is a few degrees inaccurate and have had better luck just putting the gauge up to the wall of the saw bit and tube.

    I guess we have a miscommunication there surf, I was asking about those two pics in the post I quoted. ...I understand how the notching jig works... And that's a cool jig btw!

    But taking that rear fender from a wrinkled up piece of steel to a nicely rounded compound curve... that's what I want to hear about. I can only imagine how long that took. Did you hammer that out by hand?

  13. #13

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    yes, the soda pop top look is from tucking forks. You then hammer on the walls gingerly to lock it in, then on top to smash the metal on top of each other so shrink it by making less space out of it thru overlap. Once you do that it will still have the basic compound curve you are looking for and that point it's e wheel/ planishing hammer/ and edge shrinking with the bench shrinker/stretcher

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