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Thread: One thing leads to another...

  1. #1
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    Default One thing leads to another...

    I usually try to be very methodical when I do things, but, today one thing led to another. And since I have no shame, let me tell you guys a little story, if you have a few minutes...


    I'm building a shelf rack out of solid Maple. Yesterday I was laying out the mortices on the sides, to accept the shelves…


    I was using a utility knife to lay it out (instead of a pencil) because the knife gives a nice thin line and it will help the router get a cleaner cut. While I was at it, I was thinking "this might be a mistake, maybe I should use the pencil".. but I went ahead and finished laying it out with the knife anyway.


    Then I realized that some of that line will be visible after the shelves are in… DOH! …


    So I figured, "ok, I'll just have to start my sanding with 80 grit paper instead of 120, no big deal…"


    As I started sanding, I realized that I would have to go kinda deep and, to make a long story short, it would be hard to get the shelves perfect because of the way the joint is configured. … Sanding that much would leave irregularities in the thickness of the board, and it would show in the joint.


    So I figured, "dammit, I guess I'll have to get out the planer"… The planer is a heavy lump, buried in back of a closet, but it Will solve the problem. So I dug it out..


    When I put the first board thru, I took a shallow cut... but the blades were so damn dull that it made a mess of the whole thing… ugh… worse than before! The grain had some waves in it, and it tore out so bad, I would need to go back to 40 grit paper to fix it..


    But the blades are reversible, and I knew the other side is fresh, so I went to flip them…. But that didn't work out so good either…


    The 12 bolts that hold the blades are "button heads" with a 4mm allen socket. I've had problems with those little bastards stripping in the past and, sure enough, they stripped again. ... So I shot them down with PB Blaster and finally managed to tap them all loose with a cold chisel… what a pain in the ass!


    Then I went to the store and got all new bolts, flipped the blades, and spent about five friggin minutes using the damn planer… Problem solved… But it wound up being a three hour operation…

    I hope you guys got a kick out of my story. I'm sure there are millions of "one thing leads to another" stories... Anyone else got one to share?

  2. #2
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    I have a nicely equipped woodworking shop. Nice tools don't stop me from cutting miter angles backwards in expensive wood. Have you ever had a strong table saw throw a board at you yet? A piece of oak hitting you in the gut at mach 2 will make you slow down and be more careful.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by fenders View Post
    I have a nicely equipped woodworking shop. Nice tools don't stop me from cutting miter angles backwards in expensive wood. Have you ever had a strong table saw throw a board at you yet? A piece of oak hitting you in the gut at mach 2 will make you slow down and be more careful.
    heheheh, yeah, I have fenders...

    I've been at this for a looong time... it's my trade. and I didn't work in a bicycle shop for a few years in between... I say that because I once worked with a guy who liked to say "I started doing carpentry 25 years ago".... and then, after a few beers, he admitted that he worked at a bicycle shop for a long time in between. He was basically a rookie, but he talked a good line of shit. I'm sure he was great at sales...

    But yeah, a kickback took a big divot out of my palm once. It was the only time I ever used crazy glue to close a cut and, I gotta say, it worked great!

    I was taught to always stay "out of the line of fire" with a table saw, and I respect that rule. ... even when I first plug it in.. or turn it on..

    I've seen my old tablesaw (delta contractors saw) throw a kickback twig about 200 feet... it probably went 100 feet before it lost any altitude... I never put my body in that "line of fire". That would've really hurt!

  4. #4
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    ps Fenders... I got blasted in the eye by a small piece once too. My shades probably saved my eye, but that shit hurt! Even though it was a small square piece, and it mostly hit the glasses, it was a blow to the head!

  5. #5
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    Default "those who can't do, teach"

    when I'm too old to do this stuff anymore, I'm gonna start a youtube channel called "Don't try this at Home".... Lol...

  6. #6
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    The moral of my story is that I should've used the pencil instead of the knife.

    An old timer once told me a thing that sticks with me to this day.

    "Better than good enough is bad for the job" - Tony Ippolito

    Tony was awesome... I was 19, and he was in his seventies.

    I guess, the trick is to know exactly where "good enough" lies... I'm still learning the nuances of that one..

  7. #7
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    Default Hmmm?

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim2 View Post
    I usually try to be very methodical when I do things, but, today one thing led to another. And since I have no shame, let me tell you guys a little story, if you have a few minutes...


    I'm building a shelf rack out of solid Maple. Yesterday I was laying out the mortices on the sides, to accept the shelves…


    I was using a utility knife to lay it out (instead of a pencil) because the knife gives a nice thin line and it will help the router get a cleaner cut. While I was at it, I was thinking "this might be a mistake, maybe I should use the pencil".. but I went ahead and finished laying it out with the knife anyway.


    Then I realized that some of that line will be visible after the shelves are in… DOH! …


    So I figured, "ok, I'll just have to start my sanding with 80 grit paper instead of 120, no big deal…"


    As I started sanding, I realized that I would have to go kinda deep and, to make a long story short, it would be hard to get the shelves perfect because of the way the joint is configured. … Sanding that much would leave irregularities in the thickness of the board, and it would show in the joint.


    So I figured, "dammit, I guess I'll have to get out the planer"… The planer is a heavy lump, buried in back of a closet, but it Will solve the problem. So I dug it out..


    When I put the first board thru, I took a shallow cut... but the blades were so damn dull that it made a mess of the whole thing… ugh… worse than before! The grain had some waves in it, and it tore out so bad, I would need to go back to 40 grit paper to fix it..


    But the blades are reversible, and I knew the other side is fresh, so I went to flip them…. But that didn't work out so good either…


    The 12 bolts that hold the blades are "button heads" with a 4mm allen socket. I've had problems with those little bastards stripping in the past and, sure enough, they stripped again. ... So I shot them down with PB Blaster and finally managed to tap them all loose with a cold chisel… what a pain in the ass!


    Then I went to the store and got all new bolts, flipped the blades, and spent about five friggin minutes using the damn planer… Problem solved… But it wound up being a three hour operation…

    I hope you guys got a kick out of my story. I'm sure there are millions of "one thing leads to another" stories... Anyone else got one to share?
    Didn't the plaining make the thickness of the shelf board undersize?

    I'm trying to picture what you were doing and are the shelves 1 x 12's and what size is your planer?

    I too have done a lot of woodworking over the years and enjoy it.

    Henry

  8. #8
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    I couldn't quite picture what went wrong with you project either. Sorry you had to type all that. I need to get back in the woodshop. I usually build a couple tables or wall clocks each winter. Started playing with curved front tables. Those are a lot of fun once you successfully get the laminated front glued up correctly.

  9. #9
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    Default I can...

    Quote Originally Posted by fenders View Post
    I couldn't quite picture what went wrong with you project either. Sorry you had to type all that. I need to get back in the woodshop. I usually build a couple tables or wall clocks each winter. Started playing with curved front tables. Those are a lot of fun once you successfully get the laminated front glued up correctly.
    I can see what he did. Using the knife to make a line rather than the pencil allowed the cut line to show after routering. I understand that part. Just trying to picture how deep he had to plain the board.

    Too bad wood has gotten SO expensive. Could have saved this wood for another (shorter project) and bought new wood.

    I have no doubt he will succeed, AGAIN.

    Henry

  10. #10
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    I do too now. I was thinking about the shelf and not the side supports. I normally use my dado blade on the table saw for that operation whenever possible. Love my router and router table but it can blow out a nice board now and then. I see why he used the razor first.

  11. #11
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    Sorry if I wasn't clear guys.. I was trying to be concise..

    The shelves are 3-1/2" and the sides are 4-5/8".

    It was just a brain fart that led to a whole big operation to fix it. When I realized it, I kept thinking of old Tony saying "Better than good enough is bad for the job". That phrase is so simple, but it covers so much ground, that it can take a lifetime to really learn it. I should've just used the pencil this time...

    Yes Henry, the screwup was on the sides. The mortices are 5/16" deep so, the little bit that I had to remove with the planer will have no real affect on the finished product. I'll post a pic later, that'll be easier than describing it fully.

    Fenders, post up some pics of your projects, I'd like to see your bending jigs and such

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim2 View Post
    Sorry if I wasn't clear guys.. I was trying to be concise..

    The shelves are 3-1/2" and the sides are 4-5/8".

    It was just a brain fart that led to a whole big operation to fix it. When I realized it, I kept thinking of old Tony saying "Better than good enough is bad for the job". That phrase is so simple, but it covers so much ground, that it can take a lifetime to really learn it. I should've just used the pencil this time...

    Yes Henry, the screwup was on the sides. The mortices are 5/16" deep so, the little bit that I had to remove with the planer will have no real affect on the finished product. I'll post a pic later, that'll be easier than describing it fully.

    Fenders, post up some pics of your projects, I'd like to see your bending jigs and such
    I will Jim. I gave a lot of my stuff away as gifts and lost some pic files, But I have a few things I can snap a pic of and post to this thread later. They are nothing super fancy. I consider myself a novice, but people offer to buy the stuff for about as much as the walnut costs so I am making some progress.

    I bought a 15" planer I need to haul down a flight of steps. You busy tomorrow?

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by fenders View Post
    I will Jim. I gave a lot of my stuff away as gifts and lost some pic files, But I have a few things I can snap a pic of and post to this thread later. They are nothing super fancy. I consider myself a novice, but people offer to buy the stuff for about as much as the walnut costs so I am making some progress.

    I bought a 15" planer I need to haul down a flight of steps. You busy tomorrow?
    heheheh, I'll be right over! Good luck with that fenders.. did you get the new DeWalt planer?

    I recently downgraded my table saw because my old one was just too hard to move around. The motor was easy to remove, but even then, I could just barely get this thing into my truck by myself. Now I have a more portable DeWalt... folding stand, plastic body, etc. I can carry it around as easily as a suitcase, and it has a 28" rip capacity, but it's not quite as good as my old Delta.

    I loved this old Delta, but it was only a matter of time before I wrecked my back trying to move it from job to job. It was great once it was set up though!



    When I was at Lowes' getting the new saw, they had the new version of the Delta "contractor's saw" there too.. It sure was sweet, but even heavier than my old one. At $650, I was seriously considering buying it until I remembered why I was there in the first place..

  14. #14
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    ^that^ was a fence and door job that I did a while back.. The door came out pretty nice if I do say so myself.



  15. #15
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    Nice work Jim! I am moving my shop as we speak and I will provide pics later. Here is the short list of my woodshop toys.

    Tablesaw- 10" Craftman Professional with Biesemeyer fence (the $1000 one, nothing special, strong enough to kill me
    Bandsaw- Rikon 17"
    Planer- Grizzly 15"
    Router- 3 1/4 HP Porter Cable in a New Yankee Workshop station with nice router lift, assorted handheld PC routers
    Chopsaw- Dewalt 12"
    Jointer- Craftsman Pro 6"
    Morticer-Delta
    Lathe- I forget the brand but it is pretty new and I hardly ever use it so far.
    A ton of Dewalt and Bosch portable air and electric tools, nailers, sanders and stuff a construction guy would probably own.

    Nothing to brag about, but good enough to make bad projects my fault.

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