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Thread: electric motor

  1. #16
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    Nov 2011
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    Default Comp tank

    Thanks Len. That is what I am thinking. Just having a hard time finding a used 80 gal tank.

    Doug M ny country

  2. #17
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    A lot of commercial air compressors used in large buildings are low cfm output. They are used for operating pneumatic switches. relays etc which only require low cfm air pumps unlike larger cfm units which are required for autobody work. Before you build an air compressor buying a tank and electric motor you need to find out what cfm the pump is rated for. How many cylinders does it have ? How large (diameter) do the cylinder walls appear to be ?

    You are going to need a magnetic starter switch in building your compressor set up.
    A three phase magnetic starter goes for an average of around $200. Then you're going to need a pressure switch to trigger the magnetic starter which is going to run you another $75.

    I suggest before you go any further you get the make and model number of the compressor pump you have and find out exactly what you have to start with.

  3. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Phil V View Post
    A lot of commercial air compressors used in large buildings are low cfm output. They are used for operating pneumatic switches. relays etc which only require low cfm air pumps unlike larger cfm units which are required for autobody work. Before you build an air compressor buying a tank and electric motor you need to find out what cfm the pump is rated for. How many cylinders does it have ? How large (diameter) do the cylinder walls appear to be ?

    You are going to need a magnetic starter switch in building your compressor set up.
    A three phase magnetic starter goes for an average of around $200. Then you're going to need a pressure switch to trigger the magnetic starter which is going to run you another $75.

    I suggest before you go any further you get the make and model number of the compressor pump you have and find out exactly what you have to start with.
    Awesome advice Thanks

    dlm

  4. #19
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    Nov 2005
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    Gresham, OR
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    Quote Originally Posted by dlmrun2002 View Post
    Just having a hard time finding a used 80 gal tank.
    Plumb two 60s together or whatever you can find or have space for. Also check the duty cycle of the pump if it has one.

  5. #20
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    Nov 2011
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    Default Found my comp tank

    After a long search, I found my tank. 80 gallon from Craig's in good shape for $50. Have compressor, will work on motor next. I feel like 1/2 pro painter.. harr harr

    dlm ny country
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by dlmrun2002; 02-07-2016 at 09:54 PM.

  6. #21
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    Nov 2006
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    2,019

    Default

    You can take those two plugs out of the side and clean out the tank with your pressure washer and get it squeaky clean inside. Then check for rust damage on the bottom of the tank. I got new "o" rings for mine at my local Caterpillar dealer. My tank is 60 years old and the metal inside the tank looked like brand new. Glad I checked it out, makes me confident in the integrity of the tank.

    Bob K

  7. #22
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    Nov 2011
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    129

    Default Tank

    Tank has stamp date Sept 1985. Bottom of tank(outside) has no rust at all. Was going to put tank behind my garage outside but I'm leaning to cleaning up the garage to make room. I've got room in a corner...figuring out where to run black pipe and if to go with a 110 or 220 motor. Leaning towards 220.

    dlm ny country

  8. #23
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    Nov 2013
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    olympia,wa
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    220 volt by all means. way better.
    b marler

  9. #24
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    lower Michigan
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    Based on past experience the most amount of air put out by a 110v air compressor is around 7 - 8 cfm. At that rate it would take 15 to 20 minutes to pump up that 60 gallon tank. (my 20 cfm 220v 80 gallon tank compressor takes close to 5 minutes to pump up the 80 gallon tank).

    Have you researched the compressor air pump to find out how many cfm it puts out ? That to me would the critical first step in doing anything with it. If there are no markings on the air pump then you will need to pull the cylinder head(s) and measure the bore and the stroke to figure out what cfm the pump will realistically put out. If its a 6 cfm pump then it will take forever to pump up and in use it will run ALL the time. Quick way to self destruct the unit and create a LOT of moisture in the tank and the air lines.

    Can you post a picture of the air pump ? Lets figure out what you have before you go any further.

  10. #25
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    Nov 2011
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    Default Tank build

    Quote Originally Posted by Phil V View Post
    Based on past experience the most amount of air put out by a 110v air compressor is around 7 - 8 cfm. At that rate it would take 15 to 20 minutes to pump up that 60 gallon tank. (my 20 cfm 220v 80 gallon tank compressor takes close to 5 minutes to pump up the 80 gallon tank).


    Have you researched the compressor air pump to find out how many cfm it puts out ? That to me would the critical first step in doing anything with it. If there are no markings on the air pump then you will need to pull the cylinder head(s) and measure the bore and the stroke to figure out what cfm the pump will realistically put out. If its a 6 cfm pump then it will take forever to pump up and in use it will run ALL the time. Quick way to self destruct the unit and create a LOT of moisture in the tank and the air lines.

    Can you post a picture of the air pump ? Lets figure out what you have before you go any further.
    Thanks--Good advice

    Tank is 80 gallons, not 60. Compressor I have is wrapped up in the back of garage. Will dig it out when weather breaks. It is two stage I believe and high cfm. It is NOT a HVAC compressor used for low pressure switches, relays, etc. That is why my bro grabbed it, he knew what it would be good for. Will post pics when I dig her out. 220 volts for motor no doubt Will also look for pulley set to matchup motor and compressor. It's always more fun to build your own sh*t.

    dlm ny country

  11. #26
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    Nov 2011
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    Default tank build

    So I did get a look at the compressor today. It is a Jenny dual piston single stage(never used). Spoke to a tech at Jenny who told me it would give me 17.8 cfm @ 125 psi with a 5 hp motor ( rated at 1750 rpm) on it.
    It originally had a 2 hp 3 phase motor on it. Won't be using that in my voltage challenged garage.

    dlm ny country

  12. #27
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    lower Michigan
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    Quote Originally Posted by dlmrun2002 View Post
    So I did get a look at the compressor today. It is a Jenny dual piston single stage(never used). Spoke to a tech at Jenny who told me it would give me 17.8 cfm @ 125 psi with a 5 hp motor ( rated at 1750 rpm) on it.
    It originally had a 2 hp 3 phase motor on it. Won't be using that in my voltage challenged garage.

    dlm ny country
    That air compressor will do anything you need it to do in an autobody/paint environment.

    DON'T put a cheap Tractor Supply type $200 five hp motor on it. Get a REAL 5 hp motor for it.

    Take that used tank you have, turn it upside down and tap the bottom of the tank with a pick hammer across the whole bottom of the tank. You don't have to hit it hard with the pick hammer, if there is thin spots (rust) then the pick hammer will tell you without smacking it hard. Inexperienced people think that if a compressor tank gets a rust hole in it there will be a catastrophic explosion with shrapnel flying everywhere. That has not been my experience in 45 years of being around air compressors. A rust hole starts out with a pin hole that leaks air and over time the pin hole gets larger and leaks more air. No explosions. What will cause a catastrophic air tank breach is a stuck cut off switch that causes the pump to keep pumping more air into the tank and the pressure relief valve is frozen. Speaking of which - when you first fire up your compressor pull the ring on the pressure relief valve to make sure it will function when needed. I pull the pressure relief valve on my Quincy QR25 several times a year just to make sure it doesn't freeze up and still works.

    I never heard of industrial quality Jenny air compressors, but all that means is - I never heard of Jenny air compressors in the autobody/paint trade. From doing a little research I got the impression it is an Emglo compressor with a Jenny badge and paint job. Here is basically your air compressor --

    http://www.sears.com/jenny-g5a-60v-2...B&gclsrc=aw.ds

    The Jenny company was the originator of the Steam Jenny (portable steam cleaner) - Impressive machines.


    (history of the Jenny Company) -- Jenny has roots dating back to the late 1870’s and its subsequent incorporation in 1892 as Homestead Valve Manufacturing Company. Homestead Valve was located in Coraopolis, Pennsylvania where they designed, cast, machined, and tested a variety of ball and plug valves for the steel industry.

    In 1927, Jenny revolutionized cleaning worldwide with the invention of the steam cleaner. "Steam Jenny", as it came to be called, facilitated the cleaning of dirty, greasy parts and equipment in an efficient and cost-effective manner, thereby reducing the amount of time and labor required.

    Jenny is credited for building the very first positive displacement triplex pump with an oil-bath crankcase for steam cleaners. Fabricated back around 1934, it was used for moving chemicals in plants where they needed an adjustable flow three plunger pump. Due to cost concerns, Homestead later switched to a less expensive reciprocating piston pump around the late 1930s. Triplex Plunger Pumps are still in use today, and are the backbone of every pressure washer currently manufactured.

    In the mid to late 1950’s, Jenny invented the first self service car wash system which was the size of an upright wall bookshelf. At the time however, service stations were doing most of the car washing for their customers and the system only ever had limited success.

    In 1992, a gentleman by the name of Peter Leiss purchased the Jenny division of Homestead Industries and relocated the plant to Somerset, Pennsylvania across the way from his privately owned Tool & Die, Machining, Welding, Fabricating and ASME Code Air Compressor Tank Shop.

    In 1998, Davey Compressor Company was purchased and joined the Jenny product offering. Davey Compressor, an off-shoot of the Davey Expert Tree Company, was a leading innovator in the air compressor field. The company designed and built the world’s first, portable, air-cooled air compressor in the late 1920’s and has remained on the cutting edge of compressor technology.

    On November 20, 2003, Jenny purchased the Emglo line of Industrial Stationary Air Compressors and the entire Air Compressor Pump Manufacturing Facility from Black&Decker/DeWalt prior to the relocation of their plant to Renosa, Mexico. Jenny and our affiliated companies had been supplying and manufacturing a large number of parts, components, and assemblies for Emglo for over 30 years.

    In keeping with our heritage of being a leading innovator and manufacturer of the finest available equipment, we manufacture a complete and extensive line of Hand Carry, Single and Two-Stage Wheeled Portable, Service Vehicle Compressor, Industrial Stationary, Base Plated Mounted, Climate Control and Fire Sprinkler Compressors.

  13. #28
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    Nov 2011
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    129

    Default tank build

    All good info. Thanks. Actually having a hard time finding the exact fit compressor. I've googled to death. Looking at these specs.

    5HP
    1750(1725) RPM
    145T Frame
    230 volt

    The 145T frame has been the problem. Most are 182T frame. I find a 145T frame but most have an RPM of 34XX which is too much for the compressor.

    Still working it.

    dlm ny country

  14. #29
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    lower Michigan
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    Quote Originally Posted by dlmrun2002 View Post
    All good info. Thanks. Actually having a hard time finding the exact fit compressor. I've googled to death. Looking at these specs.

    5HP
    1750(1725) RPM
    145T Frame
    230 volt

    The 145T frame has been the problem. Most are 182T frame. I find a 145T frame but most have an RPM of 34XX which is too much for the compressor.

    Still working it.

    dlm ny country
    The 5 hp 220v single phase motor on my Quincy is a Baldor motor that weighs 105 lbs without the cast iron double belt pulley. It cost right near $400 new about 10 years ago. If your motor doesn't require a magnetic starter then the motor is too small. I have a 50 amp breaker on my compressor electric feed line.

  15. #30
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    129

    Default Setting up compressor

    I'm thinking of sticking the compressor behind my garage and build a roof cover for it. Need all the space in the garage at this point and I was wondering if there is a downsize to having the compressor outside in the cold New England winters. Thanks in advance.

    dlm ny country

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