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Thread: peeling clear coat

  1. #1
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    Default peeling clear coat

    Have a stock fender that has peeled. It is a front fender from a 1999 Dodge Ram, a rust free replacement. Base coat seems fine. About 50% of the clear coat came loose.

    I want to minimize prep time, but realize all the clear should probably be removed. What is the fastest way to get this fender ready for primer? I'm using ppg dp40, and then omni mtk, and its white.

    Thanks!

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by fj5gtx View Post
    Have a stock fender that has peeled. It is a front fender from a 1999 Dodge Ram, a rust free replacement. Base coat seems fine. About 50% of the clear coat came loose.

    I want to minimize prep time, but realize all the clear should probably be removed. What is the fastest way to get this fender ready for primer? I'm using ppg dp40, and then omni mtk, and its white.

    Thanks!
    There really no way to remove just the clear without damaging the base coat so it's usually best to strip the paint off down the the metal then apply primer, base and clear. We would normally use a rotary sander/polisher like the one below to remove most of the paint then use either chemical stripper or hand sand to remove the remaining paint. If you have a rotary sander/polisher you can also use it to polish new and old paint.


  3. #3
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    Default Try...

    Quote Originally Posted by fj5gtx View Post
    Have a stock fender that has peeled. It is a front fender from a 1999 Dodge Ram, a rust free replacement. Base coat seems fine. About 50% of the clear coat came loose.

    I want to minimize prep time, but realize all the clear should probably be removed. What is the fastest way to get this fender ready for primer? I'm using ppg dp40, and then omni mtk, and its white.

    Thanks!
    You might want to try a pressure washer. Often, you can get under a loose edge and peel away the clear. High pressure air nozzle could help but won't act as well as the pressure washer.

    You will be doing some sanding.

    Henry

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Len View Post
    There really no way to remove just the clear without damaging the base coat so it's usually best to strip the paint off down the the metal then apply primer, base and clear. We would normally use a rotary sander/polisher like the one below to remove most of the paint then use either chemical stripper or hand sand to remove the remaining paint. If you have a rotary sander/polisher you can also use it to polish new and old paint.

    What grit would you recommend? This fender is far from flat. Here is a pic of the other side that I sprayed yesterday...
    Attached Images Attached Images

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Henry View Post
    You might want to try a pressure washer. Often, you can get under a loose edge and peel away the clear. High pressure air nozzle could help but won't act as well as the pressure washer.

    You will be doing some sanding.

    Henry
    Hmm... If I can get my pressure washer going, I'll give it a try.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by fj5gtx View Post
    What grit would you recommend? This fender is far from flat. Here is a pic of the other side that I sprayed yesterday...
    I normally strip paint using 80 grit but anything from 120 to 80 will do the job. If you want to use chemical stripper try not to get it into the gaps and scuff the metal with some 120 after the coatings are removed. If needed you can apply epoxy primer and filler primer after stripping then guide coat and sand with some 400/600 grit wet sandpaper before painting.

  7. #7
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    Straight razor blade did the trick, thanks for the ideas. It was pretty quick, and didn't destroy the previous work on the fender.

    Next time I buy used "southern" body parts, I won't be so cavalier about peeling clear. It was WAY faster to scuff and shoot the other fender.

  8. #8
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    Default To add...

    Quote Originally Posted by fj5gtx View Post
    Hmm... If I can get my pressure washer going, I'll give it a try.
    I was not clear on my comments to you about using a pressure washer. I should have stated:

    If your clear failed due to age and delamination, you would need to sand it or strip it.

    If, however, you have clear that is peeling where you can pull it off, then, yes, try a pressure washer. Sometimes you can start a peel with a razor but often people cut through to the bare metal, so caution must be used.

    Henry

  9. #9
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    Thanks, I'd do the razor blade again if the clear came off pretty easy like this job did.

    But next time I'll pick one that doesn't have the peeling issue, because the scuff and shoot on the other fender was so much faster.

    Of course, after all that prep work, I ran the paint on this fender by painting in low light.... duh, created more work for myself!

  10. #10
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    Default Good!

    Quote Originally Posted by fj5gtx View Post
    Thanks, I'd do the razor blade again if the clear came off pretty easy like this job did.

    But next time I'll pick one that doesn't have the peeling issue, because the scuff and shoot on the other fender was so much faster.

    Of course, after all that prep work, I ran the paint on this fender by painting in low light.... duh, created more work for myself!
    That's how we learn good buddy. You just develop a feel of how much you can get away with. Best thing I can tell you is don't over coat something. What I mean is if you know you should have put more paint in a particular small area, let it be. Catch it on the next coat.

    The more you do, the more you'll learn of where and when you can add another pass that will just melt into the rest.

    There are runs and there are RUNS and then there are sags and then there is dirt and then there are bugs. You'll learn and all will be fine; you'll see.

    Henry

  11. #11
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    Default

    Well, been doing this as a hobby on/off since the 90s... I've been off for about 6 years straight.

    The new variable is painting outside... between wind, temp, uv exposure, bugs, and daylight (or absence of such)... its quite challenging. The clock I was using was more than an hour behind (battery was dying), so I started much later than I thought. And can't use lights, attracts bugs like all get out.

    Hind sight, when I lost strong light - I could have just stopped and just scuffed it in a couple days later and added a topcoat or two...

    I miss having a large external garage to play in!

  12. #12

    Default

    i have seen a variety of paint jobs with the clear peeling off. The issue has been a budget binder in the paint. It really has to be repainted to avoid the issue in the future. Also, try a plastic razor blade. they work magic some times.

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