TheCoatingStore.com

Results 1 to 5 of 5

Thread: My Barn Find, 1985 Harley Sportster.

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    279

    Default My Barn Find, 1985 Harley Sportster.

    Well, this was my dad's bike, he passed in 2003. Long story short, the bike was moved to barn, at some point the barn flooded twice. Since life gets in the way, with wife, kid(s), work, the mortgage payments. It was never my intention to let the bike sit for so long. But you can't change the past, so now the bike is at my house. It sure is a mess, it's heart breaking, I can remember going with my parents to pick of the bike when it was new. The plan for now is to just get it running, and clean up what I can. I don't have any $ for this project, it will be a long hard road. The most upsetting things, is the rims, they are pitted with rust. The clutch is frozen, and starter is not working, I have the clutch cover off, and I went through the starter. It was total crusted up, it's still not working correctly, the plunger engages, but the starter motor doesn't work. It will work if I hook up the starter motor by it's self, I'm taking to get checked out Friday, if things go good.

    Thanks.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    lower Michigan
    Posts
    22,264

    Default

    Those are good old bikes. I have had at least 10 sportsters since the mid 1970's. I just sold a '99 1200cc sporster that was the fastest sportster I've owned or ridden. I paid $1500 for it at a yard sale, rode it a couple years and just sold it for $3,000 cash. It had an intermittent bad kill switch that drove me nuts for a while til I finally figured it out and put in a new switch. Never a problem after that. It has quite a bit of work done on it before I got it, like cam, pistons, flat slide Mikuni carb, screamin eagle ignition etc etc.

    Your bike is going to need quite a bit of work to get it back on the road. All the fluids will need changing, tank is probably gunked up from bad gas, same with the carburetor. The starter solenoid may be locked up or it may have a bad push button starter switch. It's normal of the clutch to be locked up after sitting for a long time. Sometimes they will loosen up when you start the bike. And I've also raised the rear wheel and start the bike up in gear then trying and break the clutch loose by clamping on the rear brake. If that don't work you'll have to take the clutch apart and separate each disc one at a time. Check the solenoid with a 12v test light to see if have juice going to the large wire from the battery. then check to see if you have juice going to the solenoid trigger terminal from the starter button. If you have juice at solenoid/battery terminal and juice at the trigger terminal on the starter solenoid when you push the starter button then check to see if you have juice coming out of the starter solenoid going to the starter motor. You should be able to hear an audible "clicking" sound coming from the starter solenoid when you push the starter button. I have owned and worked on many old "ironhead" sportsters so
    if you have an questions feel free to ask.

    I've been eyeing some BMW dual sport bikes here for the last couple weeks. Not sure if I want to buy one or not.

    P.S. - squirt at least a couple table spoons of oil into each cylinder before you turn that engine over any more. The cylinder walls and rings have to be really dry after sitting so long.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    279

    Default

    Well, I finally was able to get the starter going. Does anyone have an idea where the drain tube or drain plug is on this thing? I have looked everywhere, just not where it's at.

    Thanks.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    lower Michigan
    Posts
    22,264

    Default

    Sportster engines are dry sump engines. Meaning the oil is pumped into the engine and back out of the engine with very little oil staying in the engine. You change the oil by unscrewing the drain plug at the bottom of the "oil bag"/tank and let the oil drain out. I'm really surprised the engine didn't wet sump from sitting. Wet sumping is when the oil in the oil tank gravity feed drains slowly into the engine and fills the whole crank case with oil. Is it spitting oil out of the crank case vent tube ? (right side front of engine side case, about a 7/16" metal tube about 10" long that points toward the ground). If it's puking or spitting oil then the bike is either partially wet sumped or really wet sumped. I've seen people look in the oil tank and see that the oil level is low so they put oil into the oil tank on a we sumped bike then when the engine finally starts it pukes oil out the over full oil tank.

    You need to buy a shop manual for that bike.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    279

    Default

    Update, was able to the the clutch going, after taking it out 3 times, and finally got it running, not running very well, but it ran.

    Thanks.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •