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Thread: Rust Proofing ?s.

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    295

    Default Rust Proofing ?s.

    What can you use to prevent rust? Besides don't live in the salt belt.



    Thanks.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    45,318

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SStampede View Post
    What can you use to prevent rust? Besides don't live in the salt belt.



    Thanks.
    There are different methods depending on the location of the area that you're trying to protect and the existing problems. In most open areas you can apply several coats of Zero Rust paint and it will do an excellent job of protecting the metal. In areas where you already have rust you can clean it up and apply some Picklex 20, work it in with a scuff pad then allow it to dry, scuff it with a scuff pad then apply a couple coats of Zero Rust.

    In problem areas where moisture tends to get trapped I try to VENT them by drilling holes or creating louvers. Some unibody rockers can be vented into the cars interior in order to keep them dry. Doors can be drilled through the bottom. A little air circulation can greatly extend the life of sheetmetal.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    324

    Default

    Depends on the vehicle and situation. I do restos on classics and rot repair on late model trucks. The problem comes from within. You can coat the outside all you want but it will do no good if the insides are not treated. Dodge trucks for instance have access holes on the rockers which I have never seen anyone use for treatment when the vehicle is new. So I have to replace rockers and cab corners. The cabs are designed so water drains into the rockers, venting will do little good because the water sits in the pinchweld, rusts the metal and walks. Door bottoms are another issue. Chevy cab corners rot because they pack them with NVH. Nothing can be done about stopping them rot until they need replacement. Then the NVH has to be torn out. If rot has appeared on the underneath chances are high it's much worse internally. At that point no amount of exterior coating will prevent imminent failure. Autos are designed for obsolescence. 3M Rust Fighter I, SEM, Wurth, Transtar, etc, all have cavity coatings.

    Truck bedsides are poorly designed and also need immediate rust preventative measures when new. I'm repetatively repairing them.

    A friend has used Rustoleum XO Rust on the undercarriages of his excavators and some done over 7 years ago are not failing. It's inexpensive and I'm pretty sure most vehicles do not see the abuse that heavy equipment does. Although on resto work I use more expensive products.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    45,318

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ScottB View Post
    Depends on the vehicle and situation. I do restos on classics and rot repair on late model trucks. The problem comes from within. You can coat the outside all you want but it will do no good if the insides are not treated. Dodge trucks for instance have access holes on the rockers which I have never seen anyone use for treatment when the vehicle is new. So I have to replace rockers and cab corners. The cabs are designed so water drains into the rockers, venting will do little good because the water sits in the pinchweld, rusts the metal and walks. Door bottoms are another issue. Chevy cab corners rot because they pack them with NVH. Nothing can be done about stopping them rot until they need replacement. Then the NVH has to be torn out. If rot has appeared on the underneath chances are high it's much worse internally. At that point no amount of exterior coating will prevent imminent failure. Autos are designed for obsolescence. 3M Rust Fighter I, SEM, Wurth, Transtar, etc, all have cavity coatings.

    Truck bedsides are poorly designed and also need immediate rust preventative measures when new. I'm repetatively repairing them.

    A friend has used Rustoleum XO Rust on the undercarriages of his excavators and some done over 7 years ago are not failing. It's inexpensive and I'm pretty sure most vehicles do not see the abuse that heavy equipment does. Although on resto work I use more expensive products.
    One of the processes we use on doors is to apply a good seam sealer INSIDE to the bottom seam and extend it about 6 to 10 inches up the sides. We do this on restos where we've replaced the door bottoms and it works great for keeping moisture out of the seam then we drill holes in the bottom of the doors to help dry the moisture that collects.

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