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Thread: Just bought an 05 Chevy Equinox LT.

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    lower Michigan
    Posts
    30,610

    Default

    I bought a spray can of Blue Corral upholstery cleaner about a year ago and it is by the far the best stuff I ever used. I was honestly amazed that it worked that well. Give it a try.

    The big thing here in Michigan with salvage titles is keeping receipts for EVERYTHING replaced on the vehicle. After the inspection is OK'd the title comes back as a rebuilt vehicle and no longer a salvage title. Michigan is NOT a good area to buy salvage title vehicles to fix and flip for profit. I've been to a few auto auctions and even there when your car comes up on the auction block with a salvage/rebuilt title the auctioneer hits a button that turns on a rotating red light like the old cop car bubble gum machine light and he sounds a horn to make sure EVERYONE knows that car is a salvage/rebuilt title vehicle. I have tried to sell a couple salvage/rebuilt title vehicles through the local newspapers ad section which did generate interest in the vehicle until I informed them it was a salvage/rebuilt title vehicle, that was the kiss of death on selling the vehicle. I broke even on one and lost money on the other other one.

    I see absolutely nothing wrong with buying a salvage title vehicle if the plan is to repair it properly and drive it until the wheels fall off it years down the road. One thing I have noticed is people who know nothing about autobody repair and painting with see a salvage title wreck come up for sale for a lot less than a comparable vehicle for sale that has never been in an accident. They see dollar signs dancing in front of their eyes thinking of all the money they are going to save buying that wrecked vehicle and fixing it up for just about nothing. Those are the LAST people who should be buying a salvage vehicle because they don't have a clue what their up against and how much money it's REALLY going to take to properly repair that vehicle or how much damage the car really has (many times the most serious damage is hidden and not visible until the vehicle has been disassembled.)

    The guy who started this thread (SStampede) does not seem to fit in that category and seems to have a handle on what he's doing. I STRONGLY suggest that he get that Equinox very closely inspected by a well experienced bodyman/frame man to make the vehicle is structurally safe for his 16 year old daughter to drive and ride in.

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    295

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    Well, I ran into my first hiccup. I think a dog or a deer was hit, the impact was towards the center and passenger side. The original hood was buckled/ twisted under a bit, causing the core support to be pushed up. I was putting the front end back together, all of my gaps look good except at the front of the hood by the headlights. The hood is sitting about 3/16" to high, I adjusted the hood pin/ latching pin, down and it still sits to high, and when I release the hood to acts weird. So I'm thinking if I can push down on the core support, but putting some 2x4 on the core support and the roof trusses, I can jack the front end of the car up alittle to push the core support down. If you look at the core support, you can see some rippling by the hood release, were it flanges together. I would like to know your guys thought before I start jacking with it.

    Thanks.
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  3. #18
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    19,134

    Default First thing...

    Quote Originally Posted by SStampede View Post
    Well, I ran into my first hiccup. I think a dog or a deer was hit, the impact was towards the center and passenger side. The original hood was buckled/ twisted under a bit, causing the core support to be pushed up. I was putting the front end back together, all of my gaps look good except at the front of the hood by the headlights. The hood is sitting about 3/16" to high, I adjusted the hood pin/ latching pin, down and it still sits to high, and when I release the hood to acts weird. So I'm thinking if I can push down on the core support, but putting some 2x4 on the core support and the roof trusses, I can jack the front end of the car up alittle to push the core support down. If you look at the core support, you can see some rippling by the hood release, were it flanges together. I would like to know your guys thought before I start jacking with it.

    Thanks.
    Either screw down or remove the rubber bumpers that the hood rests on. They look a little high and would make the hood not go down enough. Don't do any jacking because all you will do is raise the entire vehicle. You would do better to use a sledge hammer on low areas after you remove the bumpers I talked about. The thing you need to hope is that the hit did not cause something a frame machine needs to fix. Even still, many cars like this damage are hooked to a frame machine and the use of a sledge hammer is used to tweak the needed repair.

    Put your bumper reinforcement on to see how the holes line up. You could need a frame machine to check this thing. Look at the damage report from the insurance company to see what they say about paying time for frame straightening. They were supposed to have given you one.

    Henry

    PS: I sure hope that right side frame rail is not pushed to the right. Hard to tell from here.

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
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    19,134

    Default IF...

    IF and I say IF you had a twist or needed to tweak the top of the radiator support ONLY. If it were mine, I might use a 4 x 4 across both rails under the top of the radiator support and use a Porta-Power to move the metal back where it should be. I might guess the front of the support where the latch is might be a little low. A Porta Power is a useful piece of equipment but people can go nuts and cause problems with it by too much pressure and moving things where they should not be. If you don't have one you can rent one somewhere.

    Henry

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
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    295

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    Henry,

    I have screwed down the hood stops, the pic is the only one I have right now. I also bolted on the bumper reinforcement bar, everything lines back up to when the factory installed the parts. I don't think the passenger rail was touched, the reinforcement does not have a mark on it, not deformed in any way. I didn't get an inspection report with it.

    I think the radiator support is pushed up in the center, causing the hood latch to be to high.

    Thanks.

    Chad.

  6. #21
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    Apr 2007
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    Here is a picture on the passenger side.

    Chad.
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  7. #22
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
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    Default C CLamp

    Quote Originally Posted by SStampede View Post
    Henry,

    I have screwed down the hood stops, the pic is the only one I have right now. I also bolted on the bumper reinforcement bar, everything lines back up to when the factory installed the parts. I don't think the passenger rail was touched, the reinforcement does not have a mark on it, not deformed in any way. I didn't get an inspection report with it.

    I think the radiator support is pushed up in the center, causing the hood latch to be to high.

    Thanks.

    Chad.
    First look at the support where the latch is to determine if it looks down in that area. Next, drive to a dealer (maybe a Chevy dealer) to look at the same area of the same car on their lot to see what it looks like. If yours is down enough to not let the hood close properly you should be able to eyeball this with a correct one.

    If yours is indeed down in the front center then you could C Clamp a straightedge (2 clamps) preferably steel under the area. Use a sledge hammer to tap it up. Do a good tap at a time and lower the hood to see what difference you get. You may have to relocate the both catches again since you moved them already. Adjustments can take time to get them perfect so plan on that. It does not take much to get close, get it right or knock it worst than it was so work gingerly. Report back and good luck.

    Henry

    Look at the latch on the old hood and see if it was bent back or otherwise distorted. Also, phone where you got the car and ask for the insurance appraisal of the damage. In our state a salvage sale is not allowed without this paperwork. You can find out the name of the insurance company and maybe get a report. We must have this paper for inspection AND NOW must have it for a vehicle we own that we took parts from.

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    873

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    If the hood latch area needs to come down. I would remove the hood latch. Then put a 2x4 or 2x6 across there and use a hammer to put it back down. If that doesn't work then i would put a 2x6 under the bumper mounts and wrap a ratchet strap around that 2x6 and the hood latch area. Then try to pull the hood latch area back into place. It doesn't look overly strong, but could be deceiving.

    Going to a dealer and looking at a non-wrecked vehicle is a good idea. The front end on that looks very rust and grease free for that many miles. Looks like it should be a nice rig when done.

    Henry - You guys got tons of rules out there for doing wrecks. In South Dakota where I used to live you licensed them over there like anything else. No big deal. Last one I did in Iowa I needed pictures and documents showing where the parts came from with Vin numbers. And a 10 min inspection to document any vin tags they could find.
    Avid collector of rust!

  9. #24
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    295

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    Just to give you guys an update, I have most of the interior back in. Had to clean the front seats again, still had soap in the fabric, and it dried with some spots. So once I get that done, I can focus on the body work more.
    But I think I have buyers remorse, biggest issue, I'm not really saving much money. Thought it was a decent buy, don't get me wrong, I enjoy doing this type of work. This is my first one I'm doing by myself. The others I've done, I paid my friends to help or do the paint and body work. I did grew up watching my dad paint a couple of cars, helped my friends when I could, who does paint and body work for a living. Like I was telling Henry, I can't find any decent deals any more. Like some of the other guys have said, it's a pain trying to sale one with a rebuilt title, I've had problems trying to sell a good title car, after I told them it was wrecked. This should be a good learning experience for me, on painting, I hope.

    Chad.

  10. #25
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
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    19,134

    Default Too bad dude...

    Quote Originally Posted by SStampede View Post
    Just to give you guys an update, I have most of the interior back in. Had to clean the front seats again, still had soap in the fabric, and it dried with some spots. So once I get that done, I can focus on the body work more.
    But I think I have buyers remorse, biggest issue, I'm not really saving much money. Thought it was a decent buy, don't get me wrong, I enjoy doing this type of work. This is my first one I'm doing by myself. The others I've done, I paid my friends to help or do the paint and body work. I did grew up watching my dad paint a couple of cars, helped my friends when I could, who does paint and body work for a living. Like I was telling Henry, I can't find any decent deals any more. Like some of the other guys have said, it's a pain trying to sale one with a rebuilt title, I've had problems trying to sell a good title car, after I told them it was wrecked. This should be a good learning experience for me, on painting, I hope.

    Chad.
    If the seats were out, after cleaning I would have hosed them off. Don't leave them flat but prop them so water can run from top to bottom as you watch the crap run off. Doing it on dry cloth I use either Bleche Wite or Scrubbing bubbles as a cleaner. If used properly it works the best. Spray either on then use a damp brush to scrub with. Don't let it dry and keep it out of the sun.

    No buyers nothing. You're a big boy, you bought it now forget them seats and work on what's important. We do detail work after the bodywork is underway or done. Like last! Make certain you don't spray any silicone based polishes while trying to make the interior nice as it will get on the outer body and screw up your paint job.

    You better get all your paperwork in order before you do anything else. Chase that insurance damage report. Make them find it. Keep posting also.

    Henry

  11. #26
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    Apr 2007
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    295

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    Man, that was a little rough don't you think. LOL, (I'm joking). You are right in so many ways, I laid the seats down, folded in half. I was going to power wash the front seats, but the driver's seat is power, so I didn't. I am doing the important stuff, cleaning the interior, you can ask the wife about that one. That's been my biggest hold up, cleaning the interior. Once I knock down the core support, I can finish bolting everything on, then I'm ready to work on prepping for painting. I just ordered the bumper cover support and clips for the grill.

    Chad.

  12. #27
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
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    873

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    Remember what Henry said about the armor all (silicone based products). Those will mess up a paint job big time. I cleaned up a ford explorer once before i repainted a fender I had issues on. It was nothing but fish eyes' the moment I put on the paint.

    I don't know what this vehicle is worth or what the market is for them where your at. Seems like you'll be OK as your planning to drive it.

    I will say that I'm always watching for wrecks and the deals seem hard to find. Seems like the parts are worth too much unless the vehicle is hit hard and most things need work. I normally try to be into them for about 1/2 price. As typically they have bad titles and with car fax and stuff even if the title is clean and the repair is immaculate the car fax will still show a wreck.
    Avid collector of rust!

  13. #28
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    Apr 2007
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    I've heard that, a few times about silicone products. Is there any thing out there will clean off the silicone? And I have a question about grease and wax remover, what is it? Is it acetone, or lacquer thinner?

    I feel the same way, I like being in a car for about half of a good title vehicle, and seems to be getting harder to find deals. Buying a car is like throwing money away.

    Stampede.

  14. #29
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    Apr 2007
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    And I have another question, how or what to do about insurance, do you tell your agent that it has a rebuilt title? I've been told, don't ask don't tell.

    Thanks.

  15. #30
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    Nov 2005
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    I haven't had any problems with silicon as long as I wash the surface well several times using a decent solvent cleaner. Use a pump sprayer to spray the cleaner on a couple square feet then absorb it off with paper towels. Do the entire surface to be painted then prep the surface and solvent clean it again after cleaning and masking just before tacking and painting. Don't reuse paper towels, once you wipe with them toss them on the floor and allow them to dry before putting them in the trash. If you feel that the surface is badly contaminated you may need to solvent clean a third time before painting. Never use lacquer thinner for cleaning only use a dedicated solvent cleaner. Be careful not to miss cleaning edges and corners.


    I've had one of these sprayers for ten years and it still works great.

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