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Thread: My First ever go at bodywork and repaint

  1. #1
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    Mar 2014
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    Default My First ever go at bodywork and repaint

    Working on replacing a damaged bedside on my 2003 dodge 2500. I will be doing this repair then repainting the entire truck to get rid of all the rock chips and scratches in this 11 year old factory paint job. Im also changing colors from the Dodge white to Arctic white. I just got in all the goodies i ordered from Len and went to work on it today! Im sure ill have questions along the way for you guys too

  2. #2
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    Mar 2014
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    Default

    Damage


    Spot welds drilled out


    Bedside removed


    HOW DO YOU GUYS GET THIS CRAP OFF?

  3. #3
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    If that is a coating UNDER the bed side I'd say leave it on so that it protects the metal.

    Clean it up around the area where the side will be fastened to the bed and leave the rest.

  4. #4
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    So dont worry about removing the old panel sealer? Its hard as a rock!

  5. #5
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    Looking good! How you planning to fasten the new panel? Adhesive or welding?
    Avid collector of rust!

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by DieseLife View Post
    So dont worry about removing the old panel sealer? Its hard as a rock!
    It appears to be a hidden protective coating. If you remove it you're going to need to replace it with something.

  7. #7
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    i think he means the beads of goo on the top surface. must be some kind of panel adhesive. maybe a little heat would soften it up?
    b marler

  8. #8
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    Yes im talking about the black panel adhesive, sorry. Its extremely hard. I may test fit the new panel and see before i attempt to tackle that junk.

    I will be welding and using fusor to attach the new panel.
    Last edited by DieseLife; 06-07-2014 at 01:01 AM.

  9. #9
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    Another question, i just unboxed the new panel and it has what i would guess to be an e-coat on it. Should i shoot the backside of the panel with my dplf 2k epoxy primer or is the backside g2g as is?

    For the outside ive read two different opinions. One is to just scuff with a pad then go straight to my single stage paint. The other is to scuff, shoot epoxy mixed as a sealer, then onto my single stage. Which way is correct?

    Btw that stuff is on there good!


  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by DieseLife View Post
    Another question, i just unboxed the new panel and it has what i would guess to be an e-coat on it. Should i shoot the backside of the panel with my dplf 2k epoxy primer or is the backside g2g as is?

    For the outside ive read two different opinions. One is to just scuff with a pad then go straight to my single stage paint. The other is to scuff, shoot epoxy mixed as a sealer, then onto my single stage. Which way is correct?

    Btw that stuff is on there good!
    That coating that's on the panel looks like you can just scuff and shoot it. I'd apply a couple of coats of either epoxy primer or Zero Rust on the back side and epoxy primer on the exterior then paint. No need to apply a filler primer unless you need to correct some surface irregularities.

    I don't know the working characteristics of the materials you're using that's why I'm recommending the epoxy primer on the exterior before painting. Also I'm not a big fan of using a scuff pad to prep the surface, I'd use 400 grit sandpaper to scuff that transport primer on the exterior side, you can use the scuff pad on the back side.

  11. #11
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    Default That is...

    Quote Originally Posted by DieseLife View Post
    So dont worry about removing the old panel sealer? Its hard as a rock!
    Urethane calk as used to hold in windshields and other glass. Was put there to help hold and be a cushion and spacer for the outer panel to sit on. Without it, you would have metal on metal that would chafe and cause rust from the twisting, vibration and movement of the body panels while driving. In addition, I believe you'll need that height for your new outer panel to line up right.

    Like Len said, if you remove it you'll need to put more in it's place. You can buy more URETHANE if need be. There are 2 kinds. One you can easily use in a calking gun and one that must be heated in order to move out of the gun.

    Listen, you being a novice and that new quarter being SO large, I think you might have a really hard time using Panel Adhesive on the entire panel to hold it properly in place. For one, you gotta clamp or screw the panels together to make the adhesive bond properly. You're gonna need to do welding and not just the glue to hold that panel on. You're also gonna need to grind the old and new paint in order to activate the adhesive to hold. I just think you will have problems relying on glue alone. How will you hold the panel TIGHTLY in place?

    I'm praising you for your efforts and t the same time want to caution you on what I'm seeing you get into. No pun intended against your ability but this being glued is a tough one.

    Henry

  12. #12
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    Ill leave it there, i was thinking the same about it needing to be there to fit right.

    I was only planning to use the fusor panel bonder on the two spots it appears the factory placed some. Maybe you missed my reply, but i AM welding the panel on. Should i just skip the fusor for ease of install then?

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by DieseLife View Post
    Ill leave it there, i was thinking the same about it needing to be there to fit right.

    I was only planning to use the fusor panel bonder on the two spots it appears the factory placed some. Maybe you missed my reply, but i AM welding the panel on. Should i just skip the fusor for ease of install then?
    When we install a bed side we normally use Fusor metal bonding material along the top inside edge and weld the ends and bottom. I like using the Fusor because it leave a nice clean install along that top edge.

  14. #14
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    Thats true. Fixing to go shoot the backside with epoxy primer. Should i mix it normal or as a sealer?

  15. #15
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    Default Fusor...

    Quote Originally Posted by DieseLife View Post
    Ill leave it there, i was thinking the same about it needing to be there to fit right.

    I was only planning to use the fusor panel bonder on the two spots it appears the factory placed some. Maybe you missed my reply, but i AM welding the panel on. Should i just skip the fusor for ease of install then?
    Fusor s some great stuff and I suggest you do use it. In addition to bonding, if is a perfect sealer. Where I live, the wheelwells would be rotted by now on that truck. If I were to do what you're doing I would use the Fusor joining that wheel house solid.

    Do as you & Len talked about, I must have missed it.

    Actually, the old quarter looks in excellent shape. If mine, I would have fixed the dents and cut a cheater panel for the rear damage behind the wheel. I see NO RUST on that body and to me makes it a fixer.

    Henry

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