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Thread: 58/55 Chevy Truck Project

  1. #241
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
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    Inglewood, CA
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    I also smooth the tailgate and installed a 57 Chevy third brake light.



    Now to grind more welds and start block sanding.

  2. #242
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
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    16,973

    Default A 'treat'...

    Quote Originally Posted by bam55 View Post



    I also smooth the tailgate and installed a 57 Chevy third brake light.



    Now to grind more welds and start block sanding.
    Welcome back! I find it a 'treat' when you post with or without your project(s) and appreciate you sharing!

    You have been busy for sure. Love the new (looks like) breathable ROLLED & PLEATED seats. Color you picked is a great choice with the green of the paint. Sorry you had a couple setbacks. love the grill as well. Oh, that THIRD brake light looks sweet with meaning. Great job!

    Than you for sharing and please keep us posted. The very best to you and the family.

    Henry

    PS: I'm gonna go fetch a short video of a dog video just posted today on the JUST TALK section. Have a look, you'll appreciate it knowing your love for dogs. Really amazing to see! LATER!

  3. #243
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
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    16,973

    Default A 'DOG' for you!!!

    This is "Just MONKEY The DOG for you "bam" - ENJOY!!!

    http://autobodystore.com/forum/showt...p?34747-Talent

  4. #244
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    Jan 2014
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    Inglewood, CA
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    Well I been covered in dust lately but the blocking sessions is going great. This is what it looks like after the first blocking session and second coat of primer. I think I only have one more blocking of the complete bed in and out if I use a sealer, the panels will dictate that.





  5. #245
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    Nov 2005
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    Bam you are a very patient artist. It's great to see the quality of your work.

  6. #246
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    Jan 2014
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    Inglewood, CA
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    Thanks Len, much appreciated.

  7. #247
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    Jan 2014
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    I decided to make my own bed wood because I donít care for how busy the fleetside kits are with all those boards. I like the simplicity of how it looks with wider boards, so I talked to a couple of buddies of mine who done this years ago and they told me they had no issues going with wider board and their beds floors looks as good now as it did when they done it.

    Use a router with a rabbet bit to create the notch for the strips.



  8. #248
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    Jan 2014
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    Inglewood, CA
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    I have not decided on a stain as of yet, but I’m leaning towards automotive clear to protect it.

  9. #249
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    Nov 2005
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    If you have some extra wood try using some water based stain then clear to see if it gives you a finish you like. Some of the oil based stains don't hold the clear very well.

  10. #250
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    Jan 2014
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    Inglewood, CA
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    Thanks for the tip Len.

  11. #251
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    May 2020
    Location
    Kemptville, Ontario
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    Consider talking to a boat refinishing place. They use something different, I think it is called Spar varnish. I'm not there yet but getting close. Rough wood is in the basement ready to be cut up.
    With that wide a board leave some room for expansion and contraction, they are wide boards.
    Building my dream one piece at a time.

  12. #252
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    olympia,wa
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    spar varnish would be a traditional type of finish for those. i don't think the boards are too wide to create a lot of expansion but i'm not one to work with oak much. (or what looks like oak from here) there must be a little wiggle room built into the metal strips too.
    i think the wider boards look proper, and look nicely proportional with the wider fenders.
    spar varnish might be a little softer than i'd want. it's certainly easy to repair though, as is cetol, the other popular exterior marine finish.
    epoxy like west system is very hard but has no uv protection, so automotive clear seems like a likely prospect. if i were looking at this i might consider a clear based on the polyester urethane type of paint. (like imron or awlgrip) those are very hard paints, but can't be wet sanded and buffed.
    whatever you choose i'm sure it will look terrific. we're all glad to see new pictures of the project, great stuff.
    b marler

  13. #253
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    Jan 2014
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    Inglewood, CA
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marten View Post
    Consider talking to a boat refinishing place. They use something different, I think it is called Spar varnish. I'm not there yet but getting close. Rough wood is in the basement ready to be cut up.
    With that wide a board leave some room for expansion and contraction, they are wide boards.
    I was looking into Total Boat Spar Varnish and bought a simple can. If I don't like it I will be going with automotive clear coat.

  14. #254
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    Jan 2014
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    Inglewood, CA
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    Quote Originally Posted by bmarler View Post
    spar varnish would be a traditional type of finish for those. i don't think the boards are too wide to create a lot of expansion but i'm not one to work with oak much. (or what looks like oak from here) there must be a little wiggle room built into the metal strips too.
    i think the wider boards look proper, and look nicely proportional with the wider fenders.
    spar varnish might be a little softer than i'd want. it's certainly easy to repair though, as is cetol, the other popular exterior marine finish.
    epoxy like west system is very hard but has no uv protection, so automotive clear seems like a likely prospect. if i were looking at this i might consider a clear based on the polyester urethane type of paint. (like imron or awlgrip) those are very hard paints, but can't be wet sanded and buffed.
    whatever you choose i'm sure it will look terrific. we're all glad to see new pictures of the project, great stuff.
    Yeah each side of the strips will have a 16th gap for expansion and the boards themselves are spaced 5\8 apart. I went by the Mar-K bedwood instructions. I always have some automotive clear coat hanging around so I will use that if I don't car for the Total Boat Varnish that I will use on a test piece. Remember this truck will never be used as a truck, its a weekend cruiser, and meet and greet hang out truck so I'm not too worried about abuse. It will not see any.

  15. #255
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    olympia,wa
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    Quote Originally Posted by bam55 View Post
    Yeah each side of the strips will have a 16th gap for expansion and the boards themselves are spaced 5\8 apart. I went by the Mar-K bedwood instructions. I always have some automotive clear coat hanging around so I will use that if I don't car for the Total Boat Varnish that I will use on a test piece. Remember this truck will never be used as a truck, its a weekend cruiser, and meet and greet hang out truck so I'm not too worried about abuse. It will not see any.
    being a long time boat owner i have a little knowledge of varnish, but have not used the total boat brand before. my research on it says it's pretty thick though, so thinning is recommended. i usually am dealing with teak so oak may respond differently, but i thin my first coat of varnish 50% with penetrol. this helps wick the varnish deep into the wood for a better grip. penetrol also helps the varnish flow out smoothly. i prefer using it instead of the regular thinners. it can alter the drying time a bit, but that's not usually a problem.
    after the first coat i thin around 20% for the rest of the coats, usually i put down 5. scuffing with scotch brite between coats. after 5 coats, dry for a couple of days, sand smooth, add two more and finish with #000 steel or bronze wool using lemon oil.
    it's not a glassy finish, but it's really smooth and has nice lustre. you can skip the final pass with the lemon oil if you want a more glassy look. my experience is the glassy look doesn't hold up, but my wood also lives a hard life.
    try your varnish on an off cut piece first though so you don't ruin your good pieces if you don't like it. i look forward to seeing how it turns out.
    b marler

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