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Thread: Need Some Help With Rust Repair 101.

  1. #16
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    Where do you buy the replacement parts from? What do you charge for this type of repair?
    There is hole in the driver's side, outer wheel house, and the passenger's side rocker, closest to the frame, (outside panel) is rotted. The truck has only 92000 miles, with a rebuilt title.
    This has taught me, just keeping the truck clean doesn't work. The next truck, I will drill holes in the rocker panels to let air circulate, and use some type of rust preventive, or soak the sob in oil.

    Thanks.

  2. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by SStampede View Post
    Where do you buy the replacement parts from? What do you charge for this type of repair?
    There is hole in the driver's side, outer wheel house, and the passenger's side rocker, closest to the frame, (outside panel) is rotted. The truck has only 92000 miles, with a rebuilt title.
    This has taught me, just keeping the truck clean doesn't work. The next truck, I will drill holes in the rocker panels to let air circulate, and use some type of rust preventive, or soak the sob in oil.

    Thanks.
    What ScottB told you is true. YOUR truck should have new box sides (both sides) replaced, both rocker panels replaced and both doors replaced. You can cheat the hangman by using patch panels on the bottom of both doors. I personally think it's a waste of time to weld (or glue) new wheel well patch panels on truck box sides because it will continue to rust around the patches. Your white truck needs around $4,000 - $6,000 worth of work. My honest friendly advice is trade the truck in on a newer truck that isn't rusty.

    I have been working on rusty cars for 40 + years and right now I'm finishing up installing new rockers on my sons '01 Silverado 2500 HD 4x4 to sell as soon as its done. the going rate for replacing both rockers on a crew cab truck is $2000 for the pair (naturally he gets the family discount, LOL) and add another $500 per side for cab corners. Doors on his truck show no rust at all. It has factory fender flares on the box sides and front fenders so I don't know and don't care of there is rust under them (probably is rust holes under all 4 flares). The truck is still worth $6,000 to $7500 actual cash in my hand so it pays to replace the rockers on it to sell it. He's selling because of really bad gas mileage, not rust.

  3. #18
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    We junked my dad's 96 dodge pickup with 85,000 miles because of rust. Doors, cab, bed, everything was rusty. Like really rusty. In Iowa we don't get rust like this, but he lived in PA for about 10 years. The grill support tube frame was rusted off. brake lines rusted off, emergency brake bracket rusted off, steering dampner rusted off, It just never quit. Couldn't justify all the work.

    Good luck with whatever you choose.
    Avid collector of rust!

  4. #19
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    I have the bed patch panels, and a set of patches for the rockers, just alittle afraid of what can of worms I will open up on the rockers. Should I even mess with it at this point, or just dump at this point? I will be doing all of the work if that helps or not, and as I mentioned before the truck as a rebuilt title.

    Thanks.

  5. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by SStampede View Post
    I have the bed patch panels, and a set of patches for the rockers, just alittle afraid of what can of worms I will open up on the rockers. Should I even mess with it at this point, or just dump at this point? I will be doing all of the work if that helps or not, and as I mentioned before the truck as a rebuilt title.

    Thanks.
    After almost 5 decades of doing this type of work I've learned that ANYTHING can be fixed it's just that it can sometimes take longer than expected. If you think that the rockers may have hidden damage then remove the outer metal and repair other damage while you develop a plan and parts for the rocker repair. Remember you can fix ANYTHING.

  6. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by SStampede View Post
    I have the bed patch panels, and a set of patches for the rockers, just alittle afraid of what can of worms I will open up on the rockers. Should I even mess with it at this point, or just dump at this point? I will be doing all of the work if that helps or not, and as I mentioned before the truck as a rebuilt title.

    Thanks.
    Dump it ! you will thank yourself later.

    Take that as just friendly advice. The reason I say that is you can spend quite a bit of time and resources "repairing" the truck yourself but you are simply buying a little bit of time, it WILL rust out in other areas. You will be playing a constant game of catch up with the rust. Brake lines are probably next like the previous poster mentioned. Fuel lines rust out. Cab corners rotting out are probably next. Cab mounts will rot out and the cab will drop down on the frame, box mounts will rot out and the box will drop down on the frame. Like I said - when it comes to rust you are only buying a short amount of time before the rust comes through somewhere else. Based on past experience it is very disheartening to see rust popping through a two month old rust restoration where the rust is popping in areas that were not rusty before the restoration. Take a close look at all the pinch welds in that truck and you will see several areas where the pinch welds are expanded between the two panels. There is no way to repair those "fat" pinch welds short of separating those panels and sand blast both sides.

    If you can't afford a newer truck and just want to make the truck look good again for a year or two at the most. If you can justify the cost of temporary repairs and justify the considerable amount of time it's going to take repairing the current visible rust then go for it. Just keep in mind that you're only buying a little time before the rust appears on other areas that you didn't repair.

    By now you can tell I'm not big on repairing rusty cars/trucks. in most cases long term it's a waste of time and resources.
    And that attitude is based on many years as a professional auto body man/painter.
    Last edited by Phil V; 03-13-2015 at 09:54 AM.

  7. #22
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    Default Many schools of thought...

    Quote Originally Posted by SStampede View Post
    I have the bed patch panels, and a set of patches for the rockers, just alittle afraid of what can of worms I will open up on the rockers. Should I even mess with it at this point, or just dump at this point? I will be doing all of the work if that helps or not, and as I mentioned before the truck as a rebuilt title.

    Thanks.
    I read what Phil said and he's right. However, does what he said mean we should just throw away our vehicles at the sign of rust/rot?

    At least 90% of the shops here in CT will NOT touch vehicles with rot. Too much work, hard to charge for and yes, it will come back and the customer will blame the shop.

    What Len said is right also. Let's face it, restoration shops would be non existent if no one did rust/rot repair.

    First, a question to you: What the hell did you buy this rat for in the first place? Getting cold feet now? Only YOU can decide what you want to do; is this a learning adventure?

    Consider this: Rust/Rot around front or rear wheel wells is a common thing for trucks as well as cars. No one really does an maintenance to those areas. We drive and let the sand, salt filled puddles, leaves and debris get in and just keep driving. Then, it pops a hole....oh shit, now what?

    If you have typical rot ( and I know where it forms on Dodge Rams and why ) then get a patch panel, cut out the old, cut out anything suspicious behind it, treat the inside, clean and coat the remainder of the quarter while things are open, weld it up properly and that's it. By the time it comes back, you won't own the truck. If done right and you keep it clean it may not come back. Again, I'm talking 'typical' rust/rot.

    Now, not typical rust/rot is what I've seen on 2 beautiful Ford F150 & F250 pickups. These things had rot on a diagonal angle between the 4 X 4 decal and rear wheel well. Must be something inside causing this. Such a shame on an otherwise clean vehicle both of which belong to guys I know. No wonder why they went to aluminum!

    As for you, you need NOT do any work now as it's too cold for you and you don't have a proper place to work. Depending on what your learning desires are, take the time between now and the nice weather to work in and shit or get off the pot with this rat. YES, you can fix it and YES you can do it yourself. If you've any desire to learn this trade then "Go got it". The choice is yours.

    Henry

  8. #23
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    Well, I've owned this freaking dodge, (I'm not happy with Dodge), since 04, it's an 03. When I bought it, it was hit in the front driver's side, only put a fender, bumper, had the driver's door repaired, (that's why it's crusty), that's about it. I'm at the point, I will move forward, fix it, and sell it. I'm hoping I will have an easier time selling it when it looks have way decent. Yes I have replaced some brake lines, heater core, the ac fan needs fixed, and a radiator.
    I'm done with this truck, time to move on! I was going to do it last year, but I ended up fixing an Equinox for my daughter. I will be working on it in the drive way, and painting it the drive way again. This is just part of the autobody world, I need to get my feet wet!

    Chad.

  9. #24
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    Default There you go...

    Quote Originally Posted by SStampede View Post
    Well, I've owned this freaking dodge, (I'm not happy with Dodge), since 04, it's an 03. When I bought it, it was hit in the front driver's side, only put a fender, bumper, had the driver's door repaired, (that's why it's crusty), that's about it. I'm at the point, I will move forward, fix it, and sell it. I'm hoping I will have an easier time selling it when it looks have way decent. Yes I have replaced some brake lines, heater core, the ac fan needs fixed, and a radiator.
    I'm done with this truck, time to move on! I was going to do it last year, but I ended up fixing an Equinox for my daughter. I will be working on it in the drive way, and painting it the drive way again. This is just part of the autobody world, I need to get my feet wet!

    Chad.
    If you're in it to learn, other than the rot, you'll still learn filler work and paint. Going forward, you still can apply what you're learning and just stay away from rusted, rotted vehicles.

    Don't blame the Dodge for the rot since all 3 of the US trucks are doing the same thing as we type. And more so when you live with salted winter roads. They're made to stay nice to make the payments from new, then get another one.

    A buddy moved from here to upstate NY. Called me one day and asked me to go to a CT State Auction with him. He was after cars. Well, this guy ( money never a problem ) bought 39 Chevettes that were 2- 3 yr old CT state employee cars. I asked if he was out of his mind and he told me a minimum of 22 are already sold. Seems where he moved to was near a tourist area for the summer and he had a hotel. Beautiful for the nice months. He got a NY dealer license for $1,500 (3plates) and put a car lot in front of the hotel. All the 39 cars were GONE in under 2 weeks.

    He went on to tell me that cars rotted SO bad up there (Hamden NY) that you could see what color pants the people where wearing as they drove by in the winter because the doors were so rotted. You don't fix that crap.

    Henry

  10. #25
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    I'm not mad at dodge about the rot, like you said, all three of them have issues, cheby being the worst. I'm mad at the other issues with the truck. This project is more to learn about panel patching, and more painting practice.

    So, what is the best approach, I will be starting with the rear wheel wells. I have laid out how much the patch will cover, cut a peep hole to see how bad it is, or cut out what I think where the good sheet metal is?


    Thanks.

  11. #26
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    Thinking of using panel adhesive, my question is, what is the best acceptable repair, gluing the panel to the outside of the bed, or is it best to make flange from the inside, and glue the patch to the flange?

    Thanks.

  12. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by SStampede View Post
    Thinking of using panel adhesive, my question is, what is the best acceptable repair, gluing the panel to the outside of the bed, or is it best to make flange from the inside, and glue the patch to the flange?

    Thanks.
    When we use panel adhesive we either place the seam under a molding or we glue on the entire panel around the edges. The reason we do this is because of "read-thru lines" because as the temperature changes you will probably see a seam that isn't hidden. However these read-thru lines are subtle and are unlikely to be noticeable in solid, light colors like white or yellow but are much more noticeable in dark and/or metallic colors. When we replace a bed side we replace the entire side if we use adhesive and if we are going to patch we weld it in place.

  13. #28
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    Well, I started cutting out the rear wheel arches, I will need to replace the outer wheel houses. I will post some pics soon, I plan on gluing and welding in the patch panels.

    Thanks.

  14. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by SStampede View Post
    Well, I started cutting out the rear wheel arches, I will need to replace the outer wheel houses. I will post some pics soon, I plan on gluing and welding in the patch panels.

    Thanks.
    You should get your new metal before you do a lot of cutting. If you do cutting before you get new metal you could find that you cut too much.

  15. #30
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    I'm looking forward to regular updates on this truck rust repair project. It will be interesting and informative to those that haven't tackled a job like this before.

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