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Thread: Stud Welder/spot welds

  1. #1
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    Default Stud Welder/spot welds

    I have experimented with drilling a small hole in a piece of sheet metal, overlapping it on top of another piece of sheet metal, then placing the stud in the hole and installing the stud with a longer than normal pull on the trigger. I have not perfected this procedure for "spot welding" with a stud welder, nor can I say it is going to work. Has anyone else tried this and had any sucess? If the hole is too small, the stud does not make adequate contact with the bottom piece of sheetmetal. If its too big, It will not hold the top piece to the bottom piece. Still looking for the perfect size hole to make this work, if thats possible.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Outlaw56 View Post
    I have experimented with drilling a small hole in a piece of sheet metal, overlapping it on top of another piece of sheet metal, then placing the stud in the hole and installing the stud with a longer than normal pull on the trigger. I have not perfected this procedure for "spot welding" with a stud welder, nor can I say it is going to work. Has anyone else tried this and had any sucess? If the hole is too small, the stud does not make adequate contact with the bottom piece of sheetmetal. If its too big, It will not hold the top piece to the bottom piece. Still looking for the perfect size hole to make this work, if thats possible.
    The "stud welder" is not really designed to spot weld and I don't think it's going to get hot enough to melt steel together. Even if it does melt the steel a little it probably won't give you enough of a weld to obtain much strength. You would be much better off asking Santa for a small MIG welder for Christmas.

  3. #3
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    Yes, and in fact what you may accomplish is burning up the stud welder with the excess resistance/heat.

    Brian

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    I actually have a nice miller mig welder, I just thought it might work for that occassional quit spot to tack. I never thought about burning up my stud welder and I have not had any luck getting it to hold yet anyway. Bad idea........probably better abandon any further idea of using a stud welder for anything other than what its intended for.

  5. #5
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    It was a good idea, what the heck, give something a try and you never know. I thought of doing just the opposite years ago. I had a nice MIG but no stud welder. So I got the idea, if the MIG will melt metal so easily, why not just make a tip for the MIG that would hold a stud? I had a machine shop make me a couple of them and it did NOTHING. I guess the wire being so small melts easily with the resistance with that little amperage? Anyway the stud barely stuck at all, it was a total waste of time.

    I bought a stud welder.

    Brian

  6. #6
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    I did the same thing Brian but had the opposite experience. Studs welded on well but the horrible sound the welder made when it was at dead short scared me. The thought of killing my MIG made me stop. I got a great stud welder from Len that has been working well for me for many years now. My MIG is still going strong, guess I didnít abuse it enough to do any damage, but that sound was horrible.

    Bob K

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Outlaw56 View Post
    I actually have a nice miller mig welder, I just thought it might work for that occassional quit spot to tack. I never thought about burning up my stud welder and I have not had any luck getting it to hold yet anyway. Bad idea........probably better abandon any further idea of using a stud welder for anything other than what its intended for.

    I don't think it was a dumb idea either. I occasionally have good ideas that just don't work out as hoped/expected. I have good ideas also that DO work out well so you never know until you try something new.

    back to the stud welder -- What if you put the stud though both pieces of metal in a hold just big enough for the stud to go through then put a small washer with the same size hold over the stud and tried spot welding that ? Would the stud welder concentrate the heat where the stud and the washer meet ? Or would the stud welder try and heat up the whole stud,metal and washer at the same time ? (I'm thinking probably the latter )

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob K View Post
    I did the same thing Brian but had the opposite experience. Studs welded on well but the horrible sound the welder made when it was at dead short scared me. The thought of killing my MIG made me stop. I got a great stud welder from Len that has been working well for me for many years now. My MIG is still going strong, guess I didnít abuse it enough to do any damage, but that sound was horrible.

    Bob K
    What in the living hell was the difference between what you did and what I did? Honestly, it barely stuck! I was using a Century (SnapOn labeled) 220 volt 205 amp. I made a screw in tip to go where the wire tip goes. It was about two inches long out of copper as I remember (I may have one somewhere) it had a perfect hole down the center to hold the stud just like the stud welder does.

    What in the hell was the difference between what we did?

    Brian

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    Hay Brian, I had coffee last night before I went to bed and had a hard time getting to sleep. At 3:00 AM I got up to look at the snow accumulation and on my way back to bed the memory of this post popped into my head. Almost immediately I thought your welder may have a safety device in the welding circuit that detects a short and cuts the power like a circuit breaker. My machine doesnít have that and will let the welder run on during a short circuit situation. Another scenario that comes to mind is that my welder may just be set up to put out more amperage than yours giving it the ability to heat the stud hotter. Itís a Hobart Handler made about 1990.

    Bob K

  10. #10
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    I have tried to spot weld with my stud gun and it will not work, if I punch a 1/8" hole in the top layer I can then with the MIG do a fairly good looking spot weld. The whole problem is a spot welder forces the two panels together under a good pressure but unless you have a serious cash flow making all the different types of tongs would be ridiculous. I used to do a good job drilling thru both panels then using a stick welder set at 60 and a very thin rod I would turn the welder off insert the rod turn the welder on and quickly pull the rod back out. Eastwood used to sell a gizmo called a stitch welder that once you caught on did an OK job, also you can buy these things that are supposed to be a spot welder but in reality all they are is a carbon rod and you are more or less just welding and the weld will break with out much force. What a guy needs is one of those fancy robot spot welders.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by wisconsinjimmy View Post
    I have tried to spot weld with my stud gun and it will not work, if I punch a 1/8" hole in the top layer I can then with the MIG do a fairly good looking spot weld. The whole problem is a spot welder forces the two panels together under a good pressure but unless you have a serious cash flow making all the different types of tongs would be ridiculous. I used to do a good job drilling thru both panels then using a stick welder set at 60 and a very thin rod I would turn the welder off insert the rod turn the welder on and quickly pull the rod back out. Eastwood used to sell a gizmo called a stitch welder that once you caught on did an OK job, also you can buy these things that are supposed to be a spot welder but in reality all they are is a carbon rod and you are more or less just welding and the weld will break with out much force. What a guy needs is one of those fancy robot spot welders.
    Plug welding with your mig would also work well, that's what we do when we overlap metal. We use a hole punch tool on one piece of metal, put it up against the other piece and weld through the hole until it's filled. After we grind off the high spot you would hardly see where it was welded.

  12. #12

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    Plug welding with a Mig is still pretty much the Industry standard despite multiple manufacturers marketing very expensive spot welders. Adhesives are also a very nice way to attach a quarter panel and other non structural panels like roof and door skins. Biggest thing to remember when plug welding (non structural pieces) is to not try and fill too big a hole, 5/16 works great, and to start in the middle and make a circular motion and let the weld puddle fill the hole. Practice with scrap first to get your wire speed and heat settings right. With a little practice you can make plug welds that will barely (if any) need to be ground down. Done right the plug weld will be even or slightly below the metals' surface.

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