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Thread: Systems to scan paint for a more accurate match

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Boston
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    Default Systems to scan paint for a more accurate match

    I have a number of new old stock trim parts I'd like to find a close paint match.
    There is no factory code for this black color.

    I've tried many of the various off the shelf trim black paints, and none really have an appropriate match.
    The color might be close, though the gloss is incorrect. Or a good gloss, though the black is off.

    Various automotive paint suppliers have systems to match color, though all that I have encountered try
    to match to an existing known factory paint code. So far, the result is flagged as "blendable", which means it has some form of match.

    Are there any improved paint matching analysis systems to get a closer match?

    Plan B is to match with some paint sample charts, though given the cost of paint, it could be an expensive experiment.


    Thanks.

    Jim

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    27,476

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by abj7 View Post
    I have a number of new old stock trim parts I'd like to find a close paint match.
    There is no factory code for this black color.

    I've tried many of the various off the shelf trim black paints, and none really have an appropriate match.
    The color might be close, though the gloss is incorrect. Or a good gloss, though the black is off.

    Various automotive paint suppliers have systems to match color, though all that I have encountered try
    to match to an existing known factory paint code. So far, the result is flagged as "blendable", which means it has some form of match.

    Are there any improved paint matching analysis systems to get a closer match?

    Plan B is to match with some paint sample charts, though given the cost of paint, it could be an expensive experiment.


    Thanks.

    Jim
    If you're trying to match an existing part that is old and weathered you may have problems but in most cases black isn't that difficult to match. I've had some bad black experiences and found that there are three basic black colors.... brown-black, blue-black and black-black and in most cases it's difficult to see which one you have until you put one up against the other. A good supplier will probably have color samples that you can check out.

    Gloss is another story, if you're trying to flatten the black so that it matches a certain flatness then you may need to mix measured amounts of gloss reducing additive to your paint and spray test panels until you achieve the desired result.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Boston
    Posts
    2

    Default

    Len , thanks for the reply.

    These trim parts are still in in original factory paper wrapping, so the color is very good.

    They are also the brown-black variety.

    The local paint supplier used to have someone who could help with adjusting colors, though he has retired.

    What they are willing to offer is a base color (there's 3 reasonable matches with color samples), then some toner so I can tune it myself.
    They indicated there's two black variety toners, one that does say brown-black.

    My thinking is to select a base black that is close, though very slightly lighter than my sample parts. Then I can some of the toners to tune.

    I'll start with with one quart of black base color.

    My question is how much toner should I obtain.

    Jim

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    27,476

    Default


    Quote Originally Posted by abj7 View Post
    Len , thanks for the reply.

    These trim parts are still in in original factory paper wrapping, so the color is very good.

    They are also the brown-black variety.

    The local paint supplier used to have someone who could help with adjusting colors, though he has retired.

    What they are willing to offer is a base color (there's 3 reasonable matches with color samples), then some toner so I can tune it myself.
    They indicated there's two black variety toners, one that does say brown-black.

    My thinking is to select a base black that is close, though very slightly lighter than my sample parts. Then I can some of the toners to tune.

    I'll start with with one quart of black base color.

    My question is how much toner should I obtain.

    Jim
    The amount of toner is impossible to determine because we don't know how it will effect the overall color, you might only need an ounce but you may need a quart. You should also have a scale to help measure the amount of toner so that you can duplicate the mixture if needed. I'd say that you should probably get a pint of toner, that should be more than enough to tint the black.

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