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Thread: Best way to prevent future rust inside doors?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
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    Kansas
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    Default Best way to prevent future rust inside doors?

    I am working on the doors of a 1965 mustang. The original passenger door looked to be in good shape until it was hit with a sandblaster. I am now replacing the obvious rust areas of the door with patches. There are a lot of areas inside this door that are not very accessable. What is a good way to prevent future rust or stopping the current rust? What products would you reccomend?

    Thanks
    Joe

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
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    28

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Joe G. View Post
    I am working on the doors of a 1965 mustang. The original passenger door looked to be in good shape until it was hit with a sandblaster. I am now replacing the obvious rust areas of the door with patches. There are a lot of areas inside this door that are not very accessable. What is a good way to prevent future rust or stopping the current rust? What products would you reccomend?

    Thanks
    Joe
    I find that the biggest problem with door rust is that the inside of the door is a large trapped air space that allows the moisture in the air to condense on the inside of the outer skin then run down the inside into the seam between the skin and the door frame causing it to rust. When we repair the damage caused by this action we use Zero Rust inside the door then apply a good self-leveling seam sealer between the frame and the outer skin at the bottom of the door and about six inches up the sides and we also use this self-leveling sealer to seal the seam all around the outside where the outer panel wraps around the frame. We also make sure that the door has holes in the bottom of the frame so that any moisture can dry out.



  3. #3
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    Jun 2008
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    Kansas
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    Default

    Do I need to do any surface treatment prior to applying the Zero Rust? I do have a little picklex 20, but everything that I have read says not to apply it if you can't get to it once dry to scuff it up.
    Would it be smart to soak the skin/frame seam with the picklex 20 in the accessible areas then scuff and apply zero rust?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
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    1,197

    Default

    The doors on my 510 wagon were laid flat and a copius quantity of ZR was poured in and the doors were just picked up and rolled around to get that seam area loaded with ZR. Doors were stood up and the excess was drained out to be used somewhere else. the build up of ZR across the bottom kept the valley from being there and any moisture afterwards hit the drain holes first.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
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    28

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Joe G. View Post
    Do I need to do any surface treatment prior to applying the Zero Rust? I do have a little picklex 20, but everything that I have read says not to apply it if you can't get to it once dry to scuff it up.
    Would it be smart to soak the skin/frame seam with the picklex 20 in the accessible areas then scuff and apply zero rust?
    I wouldn't use Picklex inside between the frame and skin because it won't dry properly. Use the ZR, it will do a great job.
    If you have rust on the outside then clean it up and apply the Picklex, allow it to dry, scuff it and apply the ZR or primer then the self-leveling seam sealer then paint.

  6. #6
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    Jun 2008
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    Kansas
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    Default

    Ok, thanks for the advice.
    BRP, that is exactly what I was thinking about. Tape up the holes, thin the zero rust to help it flow better, swish it around, then dump the unused product into a can and do the same thing to the door the next day when the first coat was dry to the touch.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Bay Area, California
    Posts
    287

    Default


    Quote Originally Posted by BRP View Post
    The doors on my 510 wagon were laid flat and a copius quantity of ZR was poured in and the doors were just picked up and rolled around to get that seam area loaded with ZR. Doors were stood up and the excess was drained out to be used somewhere else. the build up of ZR across the bottom kept the valley from being there and any moisture afterwards hit the drain holes first.
    That is exactly what I did for my Mustang deck lid. One could see rust through the various cutouts but no way you were going to get them. So I poured and Eastwood rust treatment in and swished around before pouring out. Oh, and this was back in 1987 and the deck lid is still fine today.

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