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Thread: Repairing front of Corvtte, best way to paint the repair 63 Vette

  1. #1
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    Default Repairing front of Corvtte, best way to paint the repair 63 Vette

    So when I did the prep on this car I did not strip this small area where a reputable shop did a repair, well it bubbled up. I stripped it out and fixed it. Now I need to blend the repair and clear. Looking for the best way to attack this? Thanks

    Last edited by kcode; 03-16-2012 at 07:09 PM.

  2. #2
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    I'd say sand the whole front end (I take it that is the front of the car) including the hood (if that's the hood). Spray the repair area with your basecoat and blend into the other areas including the hood and then clear the whole thing. I know you can blend clearcoat but if I'm not mistaken if you do that you want to do it on an area that doesn't get alot of direct sunlight. Not to mention I think it would probably faster to just sand everything down and reshoot it all than deal with blending clear. Some of the more veteran guys may have a better way.

  3. #3
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    I'm not sure what I'm looking at. Is that a two or three stage finish and what brand of materials were used?

    Do you have experience blending urethane? Do you have a good detail/spotting gun?

  4. #4
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    Len, it's the front nose of a 63 Corvette. I used base coat clear coat PPG paint. I don't have a detail gun.

    I was thinking of shooting clear over the repair and then shooting color and then clear over the whole top down to the sharp body line in the picture and then cut and buff to that edge.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by kcode View Post
    Len, it's the front nose of a 63 Corvette. I used base coat clear coat PPG paint. I don't have a detail gun.

    I was thinking of shooting clear over the repair and then shooting color and then clear over the whole top down to the sharp body line in the picture and then cut and buff to that edge.
    Yes, allow your sealer coat of clear to harden the sand it with some 600 wet or 400 dry and sand out well beyond the area to be painted using 1500 wet paper. Apply your color over the repair then over-reduce it and blend it out over the original paint job then apply your clear. If the paint you are using is out of the same can as the original paint work I probably wouldn't spray the hood, I'd mask it off before I prepped the problem area. Detail gun isn't mandatory it just gives you a little more control.

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    I have to tell you, we shoot MANY cars everyday where I work, three guys in the paint dept and two spray bake booths going every minute of the day. We have came to the conclusion that it is much faster to blend color, then clear the ENTIRE panel is much faster than trying to back tape, or open blend. It is simply MUCH faster to prep that beautiful clear that is there and clear over it again than to save a back tape or open blend at polish time , MUCH faster.

    And I am sorry to say but there is a very good chance that area will be a different color than the hood, EVEN if you use the exact same paint that the car was shot in. The application can change it, the can could have been not mixed properly so some pigment or metallic stayed at the bottom, there are a number of reasons why that could end up a little different color. So I would include the hood too.

    You are lucky being it's a 63 that the windshield post mouldings come all the way down to the fenders and cover up the whole post, so you have a breaking point. The rockers are covered too so you have perfect place to simply prep the whole front end with 1000 grit and shoot that color, blend it out onto the hood as well then clear the whole thing.

    Brian

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    By the way, I am taking it that you didn't shoot the car because you don't have the experience in painting needed to do a complete. If you think that takes experience, spot painting and blending takes a heck of a lot more! That is a skill learned over many hard learned lessons thru failure. Painting and clearing that whole thing is a piece of cake compared to pulling off a successful open blend.

    Brian

  8. #8
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    Brian is without a doubt correct,when it comes to spot/collision painting the long way is the quick way.One other thing you need to watch on a silver or lighter metallic color is the amount of clear you put on can change the color also.Your first coat of clear should cover the new base up to the blend area only,finally your second coat will cover the entire panels.The reason this method is recomended in refinishing courses is so your clear won't change the color slightly.Picture looking at a swimming pool where the deep end looks darker than the shallow end,this can happen by the time you add your wet bed and 2 coats of clear.Just something else to think about.

    Scuffing the front end blending color onto the header,fender,hood and clearing the front end is the best way to do it .
    If you are going to spot seal the repair lightly mist the dry area of the sealer with blending solvent,this will make it invisible and you can go right to your wetbed or base application,no need to sand your sealer.Also use slow reducer ,this will make your blend easier .

  9. #9
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    I have painted like the top of a solid color car and it's turned out well. I'm just cautious about doing the metallic silver blend. I am leaning towards blending the color into the other panels and then clearing the front end.

  10. #10
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    Default Been following this car...

    Quote Originally Posted by kcode View Post
    Len, it's the front nose of a 63 Corvette. I used base coat clear coat PPG paint. I don't have a detail gun.

    I was thinking of shooting clear over the repair and then shooting color and then clear over the whole top down to the sharp body line in the picture and then cut and buff to that edge.
    I followed your efforts on this entire car including the night you finished the paint, was walking out and the bug landed on the hood. Next came the tiny run you found. You've done well and would not be needing to paint now if the fiberglass fixers did a better job. Up to you now.

    Because of the car, you need to blend and shoot the frontend. If it were me and I had color left from THIS new paintjob I MIGHT not clear over the hood gambling that the color would match. But what the heck, not that much of a big deal.

    On the right front fender I would NOT blend the outside high but rather fade the inside area. BUT we are not looking at the actual car like you are. Do you have color left?

  11. #11
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    I have plenty of color from the same can to do the job. I would like to keep the repair within the top of the fender, but was thinking that if I needed I could clear down to the sharp corner on the side of the fenders? I don't mind blending into the hood if it seems to be the best option. I agree, the long way is the quickest way. Not looking for a shortcut, just the best way to fix it.

    Would you should a sealer over the repair or just color? I shot the whole car with a darker sealer before applying the paint.

    It's a little frustrating that the car turned out very nice and then little things pop up, that turn into longer repairs lol

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by kcode View Post
    I have plenty of color from the same can to do the job. I would like to keep the repair within the top of the fender, but was thinking that if I needed I could clear down to the sharp corner on the side of the fenders? I don't mind blending into the hood if it seems to be the best option. I agree, the long way is the quickest way. Not looking for a shortcut, just the best way to fix it.

    Would you should a sealer over the repair or just color? I shot the whole car with a darker sealer before applying the paint.

    It's a little frustrating that the car turned out very nice and then little things pop up, that turn into longer repairs lol
    As long as the color coat will cover decently you shouldn't need sealer, just clear it first to make sure you won't get a reaction with the first color coat. Use a medium or slow reducer so that the edge of the spot won't be dry and I doubt that the hood will need to be painted if the paint is from the same can and it was stirred properly before you started painting.

  13. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by kcode View Post
    Len, it's the front nose of a 63 Corvette. I used base coat clear coat PPG paint. I don't have a detail gun.

    I was thinking of shooting clear over the repair and then shooting color and then clear over the whole top down to the sharp body line in the picture and then cut and buff to that edge.

    I own a 66 Corvette that I painted many years ago. But, at least I know the body lines. But I think you're idea of recoating the entire top down to the sharp beltline crease and breaking it there is a good idea. Most metalics on Corvettes change slightly in perceived color at the belt line when viewed. Even if the color is so ever slightly off from the other, you will never find it at the beltline. But - I would do the hood too.

    Dan the amatuer

  14. #14
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    Default If it were mine...

    Quote Originally Posted by kcode View Post
    I have plenty of color from the same can to do the job. I would like to keep the repair within the top of the fender, but was thinking that if I needed I could clear down to the sharp corner on the side of the fenders? I don't mind blending into the hood if it seems to be the best option. I agree, the long way is the quickest way. Not looking for a shortcut, just the best way to fix it.

    Would you should a sealer over the repair or just color? I shot the whole car with a darker sealer before applying the paint.

    It's a little frustrating that the car turned out very nice and then little things pop up, that turn into longer repairs lol
    I would plan on clearing entire panels. What the hell, you're talking less work than trying to make the new clear look good with the previous clear in the middle of a fender. Ya think?
    Don't dance around with this thing; you've been dealt enough problems with it.

    Blend where you need to and clear the nose; hood is optional since paint is from the same can. Henry

  15. #15
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    Me, I'd blend and clear the entire surround, blending back to the A pillars and across the front. Wouldn't do the hood. I'm familiar with these cars, there's not
    much left to paint below the belt line anyway.

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