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Thread: Guide coat

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
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    Default Guide coat

    Does the guide coat have to be wet sanded? Can the guide coat be just another color primer or sealer?
    From what i gather from the vid is you just need contrast to see the imperfections

    Call me a wimp but do I have to ue a guide coat?....LOL

  2. #2
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    Nov 2006
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    Guide coat can be sanded wet or dry on primer but it should be applied to a dry surface. Even dry guide coat (powder) can be wet sanded but you canít apply more until the surface is dry again. Donít wet sand filler. Spray on guide coat is very thin, actually just a bunch of black dots near each other. You donít want to use anything with a lot of body that will clog up your paper.

    Guide coat is a tool. You are free to not use any tool you like. Yon can paint your car with a brush if you donít mind the appearance you get. Likewise sanding without guide coat gives you a poorer surface for your paint. You could take it a step further and close your eyes when you sand. That would be foolish, and sanding without guide coat starts you down that path.

    Guide coat tells you when to stop sanding. Not using it causes you to randomly do three things.

    1 not sand enough,
    2 sand just right, and
    3 sand too much.

    You wonít know which of the three pertain to you until after you paint, then youíll know something is wrong but itís to late then. Too be clear, weíre talking about proper block sanding, not just roaming around with sand paper in a random pattern.

    Bob K

  3. #3
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    Feb 2012
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    Thank you..


    So let me ask this ....
    I had/did a bad paint job for a few reasons and have sanded it all down again with 320 on a da. Primed the spots where I went to bare metal and did some body work (filler) in a few spots. I was going to just seal it and spray over that but should I re-prime the whole car instead and then seal it and paint it?

  4. #4
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    I canít answer that because I canít see the car and I donít have a clear idea of what you have done to it. You say you sanded it down, and then say how you treated some spots where you went to bare metal. That suggest that you did not indeed sand the entire car down to bare metal. So each spot where you hit metal could be a low spot that needs surfacer and blocking along with other spots that were not identified by going all the way down but only part way down to metal. Do you know how much paint and what type you are leaving on the car?

    If I liked the base that was on the car I may be inclined to put surfacer on all questionable areas and block them with guide coat to make sure there arenít waves in the underlying paint, but I donít feel I have a complete understanding about what you are doing.

    Bob K

  5. #5
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    Feb 2012
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    I had taken the car down to bare metal and had done the body work and primed it and painted it but it had wicked orange peel due to gun pressure and cold air ... So I waited for it to cure and then hit it with a da with 320 on it. Went through the paint in some areas and also took more time to fix a few spots that I was going to leave.. couple door dings.. so I then primed all the spots where I went through the paint to bare metal and the new body work spots. Its single stage urethane .. cheap stuff from restoratoion shop tcp ebay.. I have some deltron on the way and wondering how to proceed from here... my guess is prime it then block it ? then seal it then paint it..?

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by 99ss View Post
    I had taken the car down to bare metal and had done the body work and primed it and painted it but it had wicked orange peel due to gun pressure and cold air ... So I waited for it to cure and then hit it with a da with 320 on it. Went through the paint in some areas and also took more time to fix a few spots that I was going to leave.. couple door dings.. so I then primed all the spots where I went through the paint to bare metal and the new body work spots. Its single stage urethane .. cheap stuff from restoratoion shop tcp ebay.. I have some deltron on the way and wondering how to proceed from here... my guess is prime it then block it ? then seal it then paint it..?
    There are a lot of variables here. If the single stage is NOT a metallic color and covers well it can probably be applied over your primed areas as well as the rest of the surface then polished to achieve a consistently glossy finish. If the paint doesn't cover well you will probably want to use a SEALER prior to painting so that you have a consistent substrate to paint.

  7. #7
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    the paint I had was a cheap metallic the paint I just bought is a Deltron DBU metallic. I guess I'm going to prime it then seal it then paint it. I have KO Seal II silver

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by 99ss View Post
    the paint I had was a cheap metallic the paint I just bought is a Deltron DBU metallic. I guess I'm going to prime it then seal it then paint it. I have KO Seal II silver
    If you prime it with a epoxy and filler primer you could probably DA sand it then apply your paint. Since the surface will be flat you probably won't need to block sand. That 320 on the DA would come in handy for primer sanding prior to painting.

  9. #9
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    Feb 2012
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    I bought :
    2K Hi-Build Urethane Primer & Catalyst
    A premium acrylic urethane primer surfacer designed to be an ultimate performing high build, easy sanding primer surfacer that resists sand scratch swelling and shrinkage. 2K Hi-Build Urethane Primer has excellent build, dry times, adhesion and flex properties. The resins utilized in this formula offer excellent color holdout and are ideal for urethane topcoats and base coat clear coat systems.

    So your saying just sand it with say 400 and paint it ?

    Havent had time to look at the whole vid, been bouncing around through it

    I will say this though I learned how to use the hash marks on the mixing cups from the vid quick enough..LOL

  10. #10
    autobodytech43 Guest

    Default

    I'd like to add that a different color primer sprayed on the last coat is the best guidecoat I've ever used. If we spray white we will over thin/reduce black or whatever color we have laying around that will stand out and go over it quickly with that. Doesn't clog and works well.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
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    I would think the thing you need to consider is if there will be some ghost circles and lines around where you spot primed. If you reprime everything and do a full block sanding, you can eliminate this. I would worry about this especially with a novice painter.
    Pete's Ponies
    Mustang RUSToration & Performance

  12. #12
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    Feb 2012
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    Can you explain what you mean when you say ghost circles please.
    Thank you and the previous poster and of course Len for the help. I'll have to donate to the site, it only seems fair.
    TO be honest if more sites were run with the intention of dispersing information vs trying to make money from sponsor advertising space, I would be a paying member for the knowledge.

  13. #13
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  14. #14
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    P1010240.jpg100_4815.jpg100_4800.jpg100_5011.jpg100_5032.jpg

    couple more... How it looked before .. as I was sanding it down for a quick stuff and respray ( just to make it look better for now) I found 11 layers of paint primer and sealer on it.. all of sudden the quick respray got more in depth and it wasnt a quick respray anymore

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by 99ss View Post
    Can you explain what you mean when you say ghost circles please.
    Thank you and the previous poster and of course Len for the help. I'll have to donate to the site, it only seems fair.
    TO be honest if more sites were run with the intention of dispersing information vs trying to make money from sponsor advertising space, I would be a paying member for the knowledge.
    When you spray primer or other materials on the surface it tends to leave a dry edge at the end of the coverage area. If you don't sand until that dry edge is gone (feathered) and you paint over it the paint will show a dullness over that primer edge that may be difficult to remove.

    We are trying to keep advertising to a minimum but I can see a time when it could become necessary. We try to advertise the products we sell that help folks produce the results they want and put out the info needed to use the tools properly.

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