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Thread: Dang it! I sanded through trying to get run out!

  1. #1
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    Default Dang it! I sanded through trying to get run out!

    So about an inch from the bottom of the Corvette door I sanded through trying to get a run out. I knew in the back of my head I needed to stop. So I was thinking of blowing a little color on it and clearing the bottom half of the door.

    What do you think?

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by kcode View Post
    So about an inch from the bottom of the Corvette door I sanded through trying to get a run out. I knew in the back of my head I needed to stop. So I was thinking of blowing a little color on it and clearing the bottom half of the door.

    What do you think?
    First let me ask a couple questions...

    1. What brand of paint were you using?
    2. Did you add reducer and, if so, what speed?
    3. How long ago did you apply it?
    4. Has it been warm since you applied it? What temp?
    5. What tools were you using to remove the run?
    6. What color is the car?

    This is a fairly easy repair if you know (and control) the variables.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Len View Post
    First let me ask a couple questions...

    1. What brand of paint were you using?
    2. Did you add reducer and, if so, what speed?
    3. How long ago did you apply it?
    4. Has it been warm since you applied it? What temp?
    5. What tools were you using to remove the run?
    6. What color is the car?

    This is a fairly easy repair if you know (and control) the variables.
    PPG Deltron
    slow reducer
    about a week and a half ago
    not real warm, about 50 during the day
    I was using a little sanding block 1000 grit
    silver

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by kcode View Post
    PPG Deltron
    slow reducer
    about a week and a half ago
    not real warm, about 50 during the day
    I was using a little sanding block 1000 grit
    silver
    You want the color and clear to be fairly well cured before you do the repair. It's going to be a crap shoot with a slow reducer at 50 degrees as the high and 30 degrees as a low for a week. This is what heat lamps are for. If you could warm it to about 100 degrees for a couple hours or 70 degrees for a day or two it would greatly help your odds for a good repair.

    Applying color over the sand-thru can cause problems so some precautions should be taken.
    I'm not familiar with PPG but if the color is NOT activated it could cause problems so I would prep the area to be painted, mix up a small amount of clear and spray it over the sand-thru area. Allow the clear to harden then sand it with some 600 grit wet sandpaper until it blends into the surrounding clear, this will create a "barrier" and help prevent a bad reaction. Spray color over the sand-thru area, allow it to dry a little then thin it a little and spray it again and increase the size of the spot a little. A detail gun would greatly help with the repair. With silver you probably should shoot a LIGHT dusting of reducer at the edge of the spot but if you apply too much you will cause mottling and too little and the silver will sparkle at the edge. Allow the base color to dry then apply clear to the entire panel or section that you have masked off, don't try to blend the clear.

    Sanding on a run is very dangerous unless it's approached the right way. You can slice the thick paint off with a Nib File to remove the high spot then do some sanding OR you can apply a light coat of body filler over the area so that you protect the surrounding paint while you sand on the high spot. We just started using the body filler method so the jury is still out on that method but the Nib File method can be found HERE and we've had good luck with this method.

  5. #5
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    Nov 2011
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    I can heat the booth up to 70 for a day or two. I may have to clear the whole door. The edge I'm thinking of blending to is rounded and may be difficult to finish off.

  6. #6
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    Feb 2012
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    Utah
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    Quote Originally Posted by Len View Post
    You want the color and clear to be fairly well cured before you do the repair. It's going to be a crap shoot with a slow reducer at 50 degrees as the high and 30 degrees as a low for a week. This is what heat lamps are for. If you could warm it to about 100 degrees for a couple hours or 70 degrees for a day or two it would greatly help your odds for a good repair.

    Applying color over the sand-thru can cause problems so some precautions should be taken.
    I'm not familiar with PPG but if the color is NOT activated it could cause problems so I would prep the area to be painted, mix up a small amount of clear and spray it over the sand-thru area. Allow the clear to harden then sand it with some 600 grit wet sandpaper until it blends into the surrounding clear, this will create a "barrier" and help prevent a bad reaction. Spray color over the sand-thru area, allow it to dry a little then thin it a little and spray it again and increase the size of the spot a little. A detail gun would greatly help with the repair. With silver you probably should shoot a LIGHT dusting of reducer at the edge of the spot but if you apply too much you will cause mottling and too little and the silver will sparkle at the edge. Allow the base color to dry then apply clear to the entire panel or section that you have masked off, don't try to blend the clear.

    Sanding on a run is very dangerous unless it's approached the right way. You can slice the thick paint off with a Nib File to remove the high spot then do some sanding OR you can apply a light coat of body filler over the area so that you protect the surrounding paint while you sand on the high spot. We just started using the body filler method so the jury is still out on that method but the Nib File method can be found HERE and we've had good luck with this method.
    One of the many reasons why I don't like runs! If I get one in the clear or base I use a nib file to level in before applying the next coat. Len's advise on how to address this is a good plan. I have never tried the Clearcoat as a barrier but I can definatley see myself trying this method after reading it. It doesn't sound like you broke through the base so you may not need to do this but One thing that I've learned in blending a metallic color or silver is after spraying the primer/sealer onto the repaired area, or in this case the clear-Before I spray the basecoat I first spray the panel/area with transition coat of base. This is base coat with no pigment. I then start to spray the color at the repaired area and blend out for the first coat. I don't like to over reduce my basecoat so for the 2nd coat I mix color in with the transition base and blend out. Hit it with a lot of light and check your work. Repeat for the 3rd coat if necessary. Alot of people flame me for this step and ask me why I spray a transition coat of base and many believe its a waste of time. My answer is, it works for me, I get excellent results AND my Supplier doesn't charge for a quart of base with no pigment in it. I prefer a fast activator on the clear coat when I'm doing a repair like this. In this case it may not be practical to get an activator for your clearcoat that is more suitable for colder temps but I think it would help keep the clearcoat from sagging.

  7. #7
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    The gun pressure should also be adjusted accordingly to lessen the chance of a cloud.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by another2centsworth View Post
    Go ahead and do all of your cutting and buffing on the rest of the car. If you booger up something else you can fix it all at once.
    I have finished it and decided to go and deal with this and then I sanded through.

  9. #9
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    South Africa, Pretoria
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    I hate runs!! I had some nice victoria falls the other day. went straight at it with P220 and ended with P800 and did a blow in.
    I find it easier than to sand a run out to polish

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