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Thread: acetylene torch

  1. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chevman View Post
    Just a youngster, you must be an undercover hobbiest.
    You know what funny I AM a hobbiest these days. I work in the office of a body shop and have for the last two years so doing stuff at home is about it for me these days.

    Brian

  2. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mooch View Post
    You look much older then 52 .

    Mooch
    As long as I don't feel like it. I can still drop to the floor and do finger tip, one handed or clapping push ups.

    Brian

  3. #18
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    I think Mooch is just jealous, he means your written words sound a lot older than 52.

  4. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by tcoop View Post
    I recently ran across a good deal on a Craftsman acetylene torch set and couldn't let it pass by. It has a cutting tip but no other tips came with it. I was wanting to try a little braising as well as welding some light steel. I would mostly be tinkering around and trying to learn new things.
    Is a braising tip and welding tip the same? Also what size tip/s should i get? I would be attempting the size steel that a lot of replacement body parts are, maybe 22g? Also any tips on setting the flame for cutting, welding and braising would be very helpful.
    Thanks for any advice
    Thanks everyone for all the insight on torch welding. I think I will get the #2 tip from HF and see what it does. I'll also check out some videos on how to weld and cut. I cut some things the other day and I think i just melted it in half rather than cutting it. At any rate I am learning some things. Thanks again for all the info..

    tcoop in SC
    97 S-10
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  5. #20
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    I took a 4-day (4 long days) metalworking course offered by Kent White (The Tin Man) at his home in San Juan (near Nevada City, CA). What a great experience. We spent one day stretching, one day shrinking, one day welding, and one day to learn whatever we wanted.

    Kent is an expert and has many photos of cars panels (and entire bodies) that we hand built from aluminum, using wooden bucks and historical photos. He built cars for Harrahs Auto Museum, back in the day. He taught us all to butt weld, lap weld, and seam weld aluminum using oxyacetylene. Not easy, but welds come out beautiful and you feel real proud when you can butt weld aluminum sheet metal.

    More important for me was the metal shrinking and stretching. We made bowls out of a sheet of aluminum and then of steel. All using hammers, bench dollies, leather beater bags, and a ton of muscle. He taught us to retemper the metal (after it is work hardened from a good beating) using heat, so we could beat on it some more.

    Not an inexpensive four days but gave me all the confidence I needed to make my own patch panels. And after I installed new floor pans and welded them all around in my 59 Triumph TR3, the shrinking techniques allowed me to shrink the middle of the pans and remove the oil cans that inevitably are created by end-welding steel sheets.

    Kent wouldn't use a MIG welder (he called them manure spreaders) to butt weld steel. But the guy can weld in his sleep and can move metal just by looking at it! Wonderful guy - has great metal working tools too, for specialized applications.

    Just wanted to share my experiences, in case anyone was interested.

    Pat

  6. #21
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    Thanks for sharing that, its nice to hear from others who like metal work as I do. Although I haven't done much in the way of making panels, just straightening, welding, shrinking, and stretching.
    I enjoy paint work, but metal work is an art. You have to know where to stretch or shrink, and its not all black and white, and there is no guide coat.

    I wish I could have attended the Tin Man classes years ago, but time didn't allow it, and now time has taken on a different meaning.
    I read a book a long time ago about a guy who had a rare 55 T Bird fender for sale. It was in excellent shape, but there were two people who wanted it, one guy had a badly bent from part on his fender and the other guys fender was rusted at the rear (or some similar situation). So the solution was to cut this excellent fender in half, and sell each guy what he needed. The book went on to document replacing the front part on the fender with the damage, and after the so-called hammer welding, you couldn't tell it had been done.

    After reading that I felt compelled to learn that skill. I really didn't fully learn how to do that until the last couple of years. So its not easy, but it doesn't take a life time of experience to learn it either.

  7. #22
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    One of these days I'll get to a Ron Covell work shop, He is one of my favorites, a great guy and teacher. He's shop is an hour and a half from me and I really need to get to one of those classes. http://www.covell.biz/

    Brian

  8. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by MARTINSR View Post
    One of these days I'll get to a Ron Covell work shop, He is one of my favorites, a great guy and teacher. He's shop is an hour and a half from me and I really need to get to one of those classes. http://www.covell.biz/

    Brian
    He travels around, and I attended a welding class of his in my area. He is very good with a tig. Just a soft spoken methodical guy, and gets excellent results. Although in my opinion, the pick and file method that he uses for metal finishing is a quick and dirty method. I don't like to file good metal away, even though on a weld, it will remain visible. When doing the finishing stage, I think the file is good for locating the highs and lows, I just don't want to file the highs away. Takes more time, but the results are better.

    Don't get me wrong, I think almost anyone could learn a lot from Ron Covell, I have a couple of his videos, and I really liked a little trick he did with holes. He uses a roper hole punch to get a plug the size of the hole, and uses the hammer and dolly to stretch the plug tight in the hole and then welds around it. The punch leaves the plug dome shaped with a point in the middle, so it doesn't take much to make it tight in the hole. I have used that some and it works great, much better than welding the hole shut which always ends up porous and thin.

    roper hole punch.jpghole plugs.jpg

    Here is a shot at the back side of one I welded without filler rod. You can see the point in the middle where it was punched out.

    welded hole.jpg

  9. #24
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    LOL, when I bought my first Covell video (basic sheet metal working) I was into it about five minutes at best when this little tip came up about welding holes. I turned off the video and turned to my wife and said "I could take this video and throw it in the garbage right now, that ONE trick was worth ten times what I paid for it". That is a neat trick!

    I was taught long ago at a restoration shop I was working at as a kid that the file is more for finding the high and low spots than it is for cutting down high spots.

    Brian

  10. #25
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    that ONE trick was worth ten times what I paid for it". That is a neat trick!
    It isn't a trick Brian . Just a better way of doing a job . One i was taught in welding school 38 yers ago.

    Mooch

  11. #26
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    Default Craftsman interchange

    [
    The bad thing is if your Craftsmen is anything like mine (very old, about 35 years) the tips won't enterchange with a Victor or any other brand that I know of. So unless you get a new butt you will have a hard time finding tips that will fit.

    Brian,
    I have a Craftsman from the mid 60s and it is a Harris with Sears labels. As a matter of fact the regulators do have the Harris name on them. I've bought Harris brand tips for it in the past. I use it only for cutting now, as I have a propane tip for it and a little grill bottle that lasts forever.

  12. #27
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    I use it only for cutting now, as I have a propane tip for it and a little grill bottle that lasts forever.
    I use propane for cutting and pre heating metal also . Propane doesn't get as hot but works well .

    Mooch

  13. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by MARTINSR View Post
    I'm 52, what are you going to make of it punk?

    Brian
    That makes you how old now,shit and they say you get wiser with age big fat liars

  14. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by style View Post
    That makes you how old now,shit and they say you get wiser with age big fat liars
    Bringing up this old thread to say something stupid is a shame, it's really a great thread with some great information.

    A few photos to add to the great discussion check out these. I did these with my jewelers torch. Welded across the center of the roof on my truck (chopped top, roof is thus lengthened) without any warpage! I used .023 MIG wire for welding rod. But check this out, the side weld (the shorter one over the door) I did without any filler rod at all! I literally cut a near perfect cut, then after tacking it in place plannished the seam until it was gone with both pieces of metal touching each other and "fusion welded" it using no filler rod!

    Funny thing is, I was taught this method by an estimator in the shop where I work whom I have never seen with so much as a screw driver in his hand! You never know who you are going to learn something from!

    Brian

    IMGP2752.jpgIMG_9057.jpg
    Touched by an Angel.

  15. #30
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    i learned oxy acetylene welding in high school in the mid 50s i have worked in shops with people that do not know how to properly adjust your blaze on your torch. with practice you will learn to judge the thickness of the metal and adjust the blaze for the right amount of heat for the job. too much oxygen and you will make an ugly brittle weld. i still use my torch a lot for some jobs nothing else will do.

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