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Thread: Chevy pick up restoration

  1. #46
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    I give a good explanation of my thinking behind it in this video below.
    What it doesn't show is the subtle differences between factory and
    after market parts....shaving here, bending there, etc...
    I heard a lot of horror stories with using large portions of
    floor pan patches but it simply would have looked like dog poo
    had I not cut out soo much. Very happy with how it "seems"
    to be going right now. I used a 3/16" Rotabroach bit for the step.
    It's the non pilot version. I use that with a $2 spring loaded punch
    and it doesn't skip around.





  2. #47
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    Hi, I need the info where to get that 3/16 cutter????
    Thanks

  3. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by icrman View Post
    Hi, I need the info where to get that 3/16 cutter????
    Thanks
    The Wivico bits don't leave the spot weld they mill off the surface. The different sizes are on the link below. If you use a "hole saw" with a spring loaded center pin there will be a good chance that you'll have half of your spots go through your second piece of metal anyway. The 1/8" hole can easily be tacked after the new panel is in place.

  4. #49
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    Not to start a pissing match with you but for this Chevy cab I must have drilled out over 80 spot welds with one bit. It only cut thru 2 times and I blame myself.

  5. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by tech69 View Post
    Not to start a pissing match with you but for this Chevy cab I must have drilled out over 80 spot welds with one bit. It only cut thru 2 times and I blame myself.
    And just think of all the time you wasted grinding off all those pieces of metal that the hole saw left welded to the remaining panel.

  6. #51
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    at that point I had already welded shut around 70 holes, so what's 80 more? Somehow that logic doesn't strike me.

    The winner would be this... say some one used both at the exact same time. As soon as they're done you'd race off to weld the backs and grind it off,
    while I Simply Use a cutt off wheel, and two die grinder discs. At the gate I already have a head start.

    You don't always have to clean up the stub. Who's gonna see it, another bodyman 10- 20 years later It can hide easier than a hole and only affects that side
    that will most likely be mated against a surface. The holes is for all to see.

    In the most simple terms it makes sense...

    One leaves a small stub on the side that will likely have a flange covering it.

    One leaves a small hole on the opposite side. It's a guess whether or not
    it will be hidden.

    Tomatoes Tomatos.
    Last edited by tech69; 03-23-2011 at 09:51 PM.

  7. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by tech69 View Post
    at that point I had already welded shut around 70 holes, so what's 80 more? Somehow that logic doesn't strike me.

    The winner would be this... say some one used both at the exact same time. As soon as they're done you'd race off to weld the backs and grind it off,
    while I Simply Use a cutt off wheel, and two die grinder discs. At the gate I already have a head start.

    You don't always have to clean up the stub. Who's gonna see it, another bodyman 10- 20 years later It can hide easier than a hole and only affects that side
    that will most likely be mated against a surface. The holes is for all to see.

    In the most simple terms it makes sense...

    One leaves a small stub on the side that will likely have a flange covering it.

    One leaves a small hole on the opposite side. It's a guess whether or not
    it will be hidden.

    Tomatoes Tomatos.
    Do you use a seam sealer on the seam when you're finished? That same sealer will seal those holes at the same time.

  8. #53
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    Your videos are getting a little better because you're showing some of the work actually being done. If the floor of that pickup doesn't need to be show quality on the underside (most don't) it would be a lot faster and easier to use a backing strip then seam seal the strip when you're finished. By using the backing strip you can cut out the bad metal, make your patch, install the backing strips around the hole then drop in your patch and weld it up. The fit of the patch isn't as critical with the backing strip.

  9. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by Len View Post
    Do you use a seam sealer on the seam when you're finished? That same sealer will seal those holes at the same time.
    We Always use seam sealer. No need to seal a hole when there's no hole. Sometimes I have nipple poking out of a blouse.... I mean from under a flange and I just grind it real quick with a cut off and clean it up.

  10. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by tech69 View Post
    We Always use seam sealer. No need to seal a hole when there's no hole. Sometimes I have nipple poking out of a blouse.... I mean from under a flange and I just grind it real quick with a cut off and clean it up.
    Henry
    I realize you know more than me, after all you've probably been doing this work for a couple years now. I probably used hole saw bits for 15 years before I discovered milling bits. Have you ever used a milling bit?

  11. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by Len View Post
    Henry
    I realize you know more than me, after all you've probably been doing this work for a couple years now. I probably used hole saw bits for 15 years before I discovered milling bits. Have you ever used a milling bit?


    Len, I'd never second guess your opinion on products when you paste your link for products had he not been asking me where to get the bits, cause
    at the same time of course it would be nice to sell some things too but I think in this instance he was asking me and I feel strong armed to not answer.
    Last edited by tech69; 03-24-2011 at 09:52 AM.

  12. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by Len View Post
    Your videos are getting a little better because you're showing some of the work actually being done. If the floor of that pickup doesn't need to be show quality on the underside (most don't) it would be a lot faster and easier to use a backing strip then seam seal the strip when you're finished. By using the backing strip you can cut out the bad metal, make your patch, install the backing strips around the hole then drop in your patch and weld it up. The fit of the patch isn't as critical with the backing strip.
    Thanks for the kind words. My boss won't let me use backing strips unless they are hidden.

  13. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by tech69 View Post
    Thanks for the kind words. My boss won't let me use backing strips unless they are hidden.
    Yes, that's why I said that when you have a show quality repair then the backing strip under the truck may not be acceptable however then neither would a flange so butt welding would be the way to go.

  14. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by Len View Post
    Yes, that's why I said that when you have a show quality repair then the backing strip under the truck may not be acceptable however then neither would a flange so butt welding would be the way to go.
    We try to hide everything but there's some exceptions... Like the cab corners he wants low so people can't see the flange from inside. Just things like that. That's why it's flanged around the transmission cover, but I personally chose that approach cause believe it or not I thought the welding would be easiest. Sounds stupid but to me taking it to the end just gives me a little more open butt welding but a lot easier welding on the outskirts as opposed to welding down the middle.
    Last edited by tech69; 03-24-2011 at 11:11 AM.

  15. #60
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    You're getting better with the videos. But you have to get more "how to" if that is what you are after. It is still sort of a overall sort of thing. Skip the long intro, we don't care. And for goodness sakes put the text larger and leave it up longer. I honestly didn't read half of what you put up you would need to be a speed reader with a magnifying glass to read it!

    You did ask for a critique right? Where in the heck are your large C clamps and for God's sake your welding helmet????? The UV will go THRU your eye lids there Henry, you want to be able to see your grandkids dude, protect yourself. But the C clamps, there are up to 24" Vicegrip C clamps that would make that job SOOOOOOO much easier.

    Quite honestly, if I were Len I would remove the video that shows a guy welding without a helmet on. THAT is how serious that is.

    Brian

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