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Thread: fixing a run on and buffing single stage

  1. #1
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    Default fixing a run on and buffing single stage

    Do we have to wait longer to fix the runs? It's a solid white and tomorrow we buff it. It was painted tuesday. Never fixed a run on single stage. The painter said he applied two wet coats of ss. Any advice on differences between single and two stage much appreciated. I expect it to not be as rock hard but at the same time I don't want to baby sit it either.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by tech69 View Post
    Do we have to wait longer to fix the runs? It's a solid white and tomorrow we buff it. It was painted tuesday. Never fixed a run on single stage. The painter said he applied two wet coats of ss. Any advice on differences between single and two stage much appreciated. I expect it to not be as rock hard but at the same time I don't want to baby sit it either.
    If it's a solid color there should be little or no difference but the working charactistics could depend on the paint brand. Removing a run in a metallic color can cause you to remove a lot of the metallic that lays close to the surface and may cause the color to change.

  3. #3
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    It's a solid. We don't spray single stage metallic. It's deltron paint.

    Pretty straight for a prime once.
    Last edited by tech69; 10-13-2010 at 11:09 PM.

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    If it was omni id say its very soft paint scratches easy be very light on it tape the sides 3layers of tape then shave it with a blade that has 2layers of tape on each side then block with220 then block with 800 then finish it again1500 then buff...

    I'm asuming its the same as omni since they both use the same hardners an reducers...
    Sagola pistola= thug life..

  5. #5
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    Default hard & soft...

    Quote Originally Posted by tech69 View Post
    Do we have to wait longer to fix the runs? It's a solid white and tomorrow we buff it. It was painted tuesday. Never fixed a run on single stage. The painter said he applied two wet coats of ss. Any advice on differences between single and two stage much appreciated. I expect it to not be as rock hard but at the same time I don't want to baby sit it either.
    If you tend to it early then I would bet the run to be hard on top but be softer as you cut. In those cases you need to let the exposed soft material to harden up more before proceeding. You can do a cut then use a heat lamp to help harden the rest. If you rush it, you'll end up painting again. Good luck. Henry

  6. #6
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    Thanks guys. Too soft to use a blade according to my finger nail so I used a paint stick and 1000. I also wanted to work on getting the run all the way out and after a while it's tough to re-find it due to it being white and feel it by hand(when it's almost flat) but a thin film of water worked well in showing me how much was left.

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    Quote Originally Posted by style View Post
    If it was omni id say its very soft paint scratches easy be very light on it tape the sides 3layers of tape then shave it with a blade that has 2layers of tape on each side then block with220 then block with 800 then finish it again1500 then buff...

    I'm asuming its the same as omni since they both use the same hardners an reducers...
    I'll try that with the tape on the blade ends. I usually bend them to get the edges out of the way but am always willing to try something new.

  8. #8
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    Default Advice

    Good advice Henry.
    [SIGPIC]

  9. #9

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    What is the purpose of putting tape on the blade sides? Is it for grip? Can you describe what you mean by putting it on the sides, like just down to the cutting edge?

    Does the run have to be fully hardened to do this?

  10. #10
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    You use it like a wood plane to shave down the run,way faster than sanding with a block.The tape keeps the ends from digging into the paint.Just a simple scraping action with the razor blade works best,then follow up with some 1500,2000,and polish.You will have the best success with the run being hard and fully cured.

  11. #11
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    scrape it the "safe way" where the blade can never dig in. You only want it in the position where it can dig when you chop off the top. If you do it lightly and very rapidly you will have it cut in no time with no issues of leaving marks. how much paint is on there should dictate how flat you cut it. You can put a sheen of water on it and sight it from an angle to see the true clarity of what it can look like buffed out. Nothing worse than sanding it out, buffing, and realizing it's still there.

    After I use the blade I then use a paint stick, but with the sanding focused on the edge and on the run. I only feather it out when it's nearly flat.
    Feathering it out is important cause you don't want ripples, so making sure you only sand on the run up to that point is important.



    Then again, I'm no master buffer. This is just what works for me.

  12. #12
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    The best way to use a razor blade is as follows:

    1) Take a smooth round shanked phillips screwdriver and holding a razor blade at a 45 degree angle attempt to roll over the edge of the razor blade against the shank of the phillips screwdriver. The purpose of this step is to form a burr on the edge of the razor blade.

    2) Feel the edge for the burr. If you did step 1 correctly you will feel a very distinct burr. That's what you're looking for.

    3) Slightly bend the razor blade so that the center of the burred edge side of the razor blade is higher than the edges. the blade should look like this ( with the burred edge on the left hand side. The reason for this is to remove the edges of the blade from the scrapping equation so that they don't hit the work and dig in.

    4) Using this tool as a scrapper you can shave off the run with extreme speed. It will shave off hardened clear like a plane takes shavings off of lumber.

    5) Remove 90% of the run this way and finish with wet paper.

    6) This works way better than starting with wet paper since the scraper works only on the run. Less collateral damage on the good clear.

    7) Alternatively use the polyester spot putty method which works extremely well too and was posted here some time ago.

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