TheCoatingStore.com

Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: clear basecoat for blending?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    120

    Default clear basecoat for blending?

    I watched powerblock's Trucks show a couple weeks ago. Their project was painting part of a newer truck that had collision damage. The segment was on blending to get a good match, and the host Kevin Tetz demonstrated using clear base coat to dilute the colored base coat. First time I heard of clear base coat. At first I thought he was talking about adding his base coat color to regular clear, but it seemed like its an actual base coat that happens to be clear product. I think he talked about it making the metallic float out better in the light covered areas. Anyone actually do this? I have a blend job to do in my future (silver metallic), I'd be game if it made the job easier.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Houston, TX
    Posts
    162

    Default

    Yes it helps the metallics/pearls melt into the existing finish. I spray a coat of clear basecoat (DBC 500 if you're using PPG) on my blend panels before blending out my base. I use to do it with just high metallics but after one redo i do it with anything with pearl in it to be on the safe side. I think I saw that episode and I don't use the exact same process but it does work great. Make sure you reduce the clear base just like any other basecoat.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    188

    Default

    Is the orientation coat the same as "color blender", which mixed with color base 1:1 ?

    When does the clear base used without base mixed, but just by itself?

  4. #4

    Cool

    I use Bulldog adhesion promoter kind of the same way.
    Cover the entire panel with that before blending your base.
    It fills the scratches and gives a uniform surface for
    the base to feather out onto.

  5. #5
    tomwiller Guest

    Default

    You can use a transparent toner to give you somewhat of an idea what it will look like. try to use the correct one to blend.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    lower Michigan
    Posts
    30,620

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by fj5gtx View Post
    I watched powerblock's Trucks show a couple weeks ago. Their project was painting part of a newer truck that had collision damage. The segment was on blending to get a good match, and the host Kevin Tetz demonstrated using clear base coat to dilute the colored base coat. First time I heard of clear base coat. At first I thought he was talking about adding his base coat color to regular clear, but it seemed like its an actual base coat that happens to be clear product. I think he talked about it making the metallic float out better in the light covered areas. Anyone actually do this? I have a blend job to do in my future (silver metallic), I'd be game if it made the job easier.
    Usually on blending silver metallic its not the blend that causes the mismatch, its the paint itself where the mismatch is the problem (lighter or darker shade of silver).

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    2,583

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by fj5gtx View Post
    I watched powerblock's Trucks show a couple weeks ago. Their project was painting part of a newer truck that had collision damage. The segment was on blending to get a good match, and the host Kevin Tetz demonstrated using clear base coat to dilute the colored base coat. First time I heard of clear base coat. At first I thought he was talking about adding his base coat color to regular clear, but it seemed like its an actual base coat that happens to be clear product. I think he talked about it making the metallic float out better in the light covered areas. Anyone actually do this? I have a blend job to do in my future (silver metallic), I'd be game if it made the job easier.
    As others said, adhesion promoter will take care of that and since it's light silver it has the added bonus of hiding scratches. It'd serve as great insurance for the job. As Phil said, the value of a silver is either darker or lighter. To my understanding to take care of that is adding lighter or darker metalics in the formula.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •