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Thread: Paintless Dent Repair (PDR) tools, how are they used?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
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    160

    Default Paintless Dent Repair (PDR) tools, how are they used?

    I've seen quite a few videos about PDR, I think they're awsome.

    I've searched every where about how these tools and techniques are used but it seemed to be a mystery. Tools are simple 'bend metal sticks', Im curious to know how they are applied to the dents.

    Anyone?

  2. #2
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    Sep 2009
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    minnesota
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    i used to work at a shop that had a set of pdr tools,i tried them,but i just got hail dents close enough to fill with a thin coat of glaze.it takes a lot of practice to make perfect repairs,i do not have the patience,i would rather do a conventional repair,it is quicker for me.but if you want to try it,get some junk hoods and put some ball pein hammer dents in it and practice.keep in mind that those tools are very expensive,but if you get good at it,you can make a living at it.i remember seeing a training video,but i can't remember where.

  3. #3
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    Aug 2009
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    found this little insight on how it's done. But not exactly how to align lines, where to push, and with what tools.

    http://www.autobodypro.com/tektips/a...nt_removal.htm

  4. #4
    88GT Guest

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    we (or a pdr tech) cant verbalize experience, which is what you need. Nothing we can tell you will make you an expert. You need the tools and the years of experience. Get some tools and go learn it.

  5. #5
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    Dec 2005
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    Quote Originally Posted by divinity
    I've seen quite a few videos about PDR, I think they're awsome.

    I've searched every where about how these tools and techniques are used but it seemed to be a mystery. Tools are simple 'bend metal sticks', Im curious to know how they are applied to the dents.

    Anyone?
    I have only seen it done once but was amazed. It was on a guys corvette and it had a door's vertical crease right down the bend in the panel and it was fully creased, not just dented. The guy pulled out a couple long angle picks and went right down the window channel and started pushing. All told it took him 15 minutes and all trace of the crease was gone. Now it was a blue car not black or red which would scream it out but the result to me was fantastic. I think he paid fifty bucks which in my estimation was dirt cheap. Must be some sort of magic.

  6. #6
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    Nov 2005
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    Quote Originally Posted by drizler
    I have only seen it done once but was amazed. It was on a guys corvette and it had a door's vertical crease right down the bend in the panel and it was fully creased, not just dented. The guy pulled out a couple long angle picks and went right down the window channel and started pushing. All told it took him 15 minutes and all trace of the crease was gone. Now it was a blue car not black or red which would scream it out but the result to me was fantastic. I think he paid fifty bucks which in my estimation was dirt cheap. Must be some sort of magic.
    Wow, I never thought about using PDR on fiberglass.

  7. #7
    88GT Guest

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    I was trying to think of a year they had steel doors

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by 88GT
    I was trying to think of a year they had steel doors
    I think I've worked on every year Vette but I don't remember ANY steel panels.

  9. #9
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    When I read a story describing a personal account of something that happened in the past I try to give the writer a little latitude. I can appreciate that the details of several experiences get mixed together. As I get older I can see it happening to me. I remember clearly something I did in the shop 10 years ago as if it were done earlier today. Then I find my notes from the job and discover my memory has blended something from an unrelated job. It happens. It could be something like watching the work on a T-Bird and remembering it as a Vet. We arenít under oath giving testimony that will put someone into jail for ten years, but even when we are the details sometimes prove to be wrong.

    Bob K

  10. #10
    88GT Guest

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob K
    When I read a story describing a personal account of something that happened in the past I try to give the writer a little latitude. I can appreciate that the details of several experiences get mixed together. As I get older I can see it happening to me. I remember clearly something I did in the shop 10 years ago as if it were done earlier today. Then I find my notes from the job and discover my memory has blended something from an unrelated job. It happens. It could be something like watching the work on a T-Bird and remembering it as a Vet. We arenít under oath giving testimony that will put someone into jail for ten years, but even when we are the details sometimes prove to be wrong.

    Bob K
    We, the jury, find the defendant Not guilty

  11. #11
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    Dec 2005
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    Default OK, OK Now You Got Even Me Wondering

    Quote Originally Posted by Len
    I think I've worked on every year Vette but I don't remember ANY steel panels.

    Craps I can't have alzheimers yet can I? Thing is he is one of those guys who worships his cars and has a , say mid 80's vette and a 1994 Cavalier pace car convertible. He is one of those guys you hate since all his old stuff is pristine here in the rust belt while ours is corroding away. Really, I don't know how he does it. Thing is here both those cars are painted almost an exact same color blue to the point that sometimes you look out the door of where we worked and you couldn't tell which car was out there if they were backed in. I don't see much of him anymore as I don't work at that place but I will try to ask or at least drive by and give that vet a tap on the door next time I go by. Could it possibly have been an aftermarket door??? Throw me a bone here, I need an out as bad as Slick Willy and I can assure you I didn't have sex with Johns Vette.

    There, not guilty by a state of total confusion. I always said if I get off Midnights a few days and my IQ jumps 20% and I have been doing them for almost exactly 20 years now so could be I was really looking at his Cavalier or the side of one of my daughters horses, who knows?? Whatever the case that guy did as perfect a job as I have ever seen with those 2 or three picks. I do clearly remember it was a nice deep (FAT OLD DOOR SLINGIN HILLBILLY WOMAN SWINGIN LIKE BABE RUTH) sort of parking lot crease for sure. The paint hadn't been disturbed but it was about to that point.

  12. #12
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    Mar 2009
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    I have practiced pdr for over 17 years. Pdr is difficult to learn but the secret is in the light. A fluorescent light ie shop light is the best way to show high and low spots of a ding it also allows you to see the tip of your tool by dragging the tool underneath the metal and watching the light bar bend when the tool is in the area you want to work on. Pushing out the dent is just the beginning. You also have to learn to knock down high spots flat with the surrounding metal. I think the videos will give you an idea of how to do pdr but like everyone else here has said it takes experience.

  13. #13
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    Oct 2007
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    NORTH JUAREZ
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    Quote Originally Posted by Len
    Wow, I never thought about using PDR on fiberglass.
    ,maybe he means a camaro,lol..
    Get bent, Sock Puppet..

  14. #14
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    Jul 2006
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    Niagara Region (Canada)
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    Quote Originally Posted by style
    ,maybe he means a camaro,lol..
    Must be only metal ever in a Vette was the floor pan none in the body

  15. #15
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    Aug 2009
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    I did PDR!

    I had a big dent in my quarter panel, used the cheapo glue puller from kragen and got about 70% out, however, still a size of a fist left.

    I was able to reach into the quarter panel with a long screwdriver through an access hole, pushed it out with the screwdriver. Although I don't know anything about PDR, no guiding light or lines, I was able to reduced the dent much smaller and less noticeable.

    It's time to get a set of PDR tool and start learning!

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