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Thread: Sanders

  1. #1
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    May 2006
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    Default Sanders

    I have a couple of cars I'd like to do most of the prep work on but my compressor can't drive a DA. I have a 20 gallon 5.5hp that runs all the time. Does anyone make an electric DA?

  2. #2
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    Nov 2005
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    Default taking off paint??

    Quote Originally Posted by David
    I have a couple of cars I'd like to do most of the prep work on but my compressor can't drive a DA. I have a 20 gallon 5.5hp that runs all the time. Does anyone make an electric DA?
    If you want to take off paint then use something like the Makita 9227 sander polisher. What are you doing in detail; lots of paint, rust, filler, etc. Henry

  3. #3
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    May 2006
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    Default

    I have one car that somebody did a driveway job on and it has orange peel and checking on the roof. So the roof at least needs to go down to the primer or metal while the rest of the car just needs a good sanding. This isn't a restore project I just want to get it to the point where a $500 paint job will look Okay. I've heard One Day Paint and Body does pretty good gun work. Would it be easier in some cases to use a chemical paint remover rather than sanding? My other car I want to do has a peeling clear coat. I've tried to sand that with a Sears electric and the paper fills up and I think it will take forever to sand that one. The electric I have has a 6" rubber pad that bounces a lot and the paper starts to slide out of position.

  4. #4
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    May 2006
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    Default

    The Makitta looks similiar to the Sears sander/polisher I have. The Sears sander though has a threaded shaft and I can only use the rubber backing pad that came with it. It bounces real bad and it's too stiff so it doesn't conform to the car surface. What are these hook and loop type pads? Is that what I need rather than sandpaper? BTW I'm not a body repair person just a guy trying to make a couple cars look better without spending a lot of money.

  5. #5
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    Nov 2005
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    lower Michigan
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    Default

    What brand and type of DA are you using ?

  6. #6
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    S. CA
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    Default

    I think you need the Makita polisher with the sanding attachments. Nice thing about that is, when you're done with the paint, you can polish your cars, get good, polish your friends cars and get your money out of the machine or just sell it used on eBay or something. So, it's not a huge investment. That machine will take the paint off better than using stripper in your driveway, dust is one thing, toxic waste is another.

    When it comes to electric sanders, Dennis knows more than I even want to know so if this thread gets his attention and you've asked the right questions, between Dennis, Phil and Henry you can't go wrong.

    Take Care,
    Robert

  7. #7
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    May 2006
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    Default

    Okay Makita sounds like the answer. What about papers and pads? I see some sites that advertise "hook and loop" pads. What are these or does the Makita come with the pad I need? What about papers? I think I need to use around 80 grit to get the job done? Too course? or should I start at 80 and go finer as I get closer to the primer? Oh by the way both cars have acylic enamal on them and one has pealing clear coat. I think I can still use my DA for the small areas I need to bondo without burning up my compessor. The DA I have is a cheap one from Harbor Freight. Do better ones require less air? Somebody told me that no matter who makes the DA I'd need a 220v compressor with at least 30 gallons. I like the electric approach though because of it's dual use as a polisher. I assume the Makita has a nice speed control.

  8. #8
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    Nov 2005
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    Default Stripping and Sanding

    To remove or to polish the paint the Makita is a great tool. We strip panels or entire cars with the Makita then do our paint work and put buffing pads on the machine to polish the new paint.

    If the existing paint needs to be removed the Makita is the tool but if you only need to scuff the paint in order to put more paint on top you can use a DA or even do the sanding by hand.

    We've found that the 80 grit works best on most paint materials. The hook and loop pad and paper works much better than stick-on paper for this task.

    The link below shows the Makita and Stripping Combo in use and has additional links to our store if you want to check out prices.


    Strip and Repaint Link

  9. #9
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    Nov 2005
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    3,327

    Default Sears does NOT have anything...

    Quote Originally Posted by David
    The Makitta looks similiar to the Sears sander/polisher I have. The Sears sander though has a threaded shaft and I can only use the rubber backing pad that came with it. It bounces real bad and it's too stiff so it doesn't conform to the car surface. What are these hook and loop type pads? Is that what I need rather than sandpaper? BTW I'm not a body repair person just a guy trying to make a couple cars look better without spending a lot of money.
    good in the way of proper sander and NO polishers to use on autobody work; and that surprises me a lot.
    That sander of Sears you are talking about may look like a Makita but let me tell you right now that any jumping around is the unit itself and not a screw on rubber backer; and I refer to a 5/8 thread by the way. I can sit all day long with my old SIOUX very HEAVY polisher/SANDER operating it with one hand to take paint off. Arms are tired and sore for a week later though because the machine is just too heavy.
    Today, with taking paint off and buffing new paint you need the Makita and to be honest with you Len does offer the best price on the unit and is here as you talk to us all to stand behind what he sells.
    As for the DA, the air hungry monsters are the Ingersol Rand. I use Hutchins and never notice (ok, rarely notice) my compressor kick on. My National Detroits kick on more but I use them for other things. I believe Lens AirVantage is stingy on air also.
    If you are seriously in this then buy some good tools; better than Harbor Frieght low ball price ones that is. Even after, you can sell good tools and recoop a lot of money; Harbor Frieght you throw away. Henry

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    5

    Default Harbor sells junk


    Yep I have bought some stuff there but consider it a one job hope is lasts throw away. I never realized though that there was such a differance in air requirements for DA sanders. From an energy standpoint the thing I bought at HF causes my compressor to run 100% of the time. I've got A 15A compressor running all the time yet this sander cannot even rotate against any resistance whatsoever. It will spin in the air but put the paper down on the paint and it quits. How is it possible to design such a machine that wastes2.5HP and does no mechanical work? It seems to violate the laws of thermodynamics. It makes a lot of noise so it must generate 2.5HP work of accoustic energy. Ha I just remembered the HF airhose I had that blew up. Yep on the hose it says 600psi rating yet the thing blew up at 90psi. LOL

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