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Thread: Custom fiberglass center console

  1. #1

    Default Custom fiberglass center console

    I decided to make a center console for my truck. I made it to hold 3 gauges, my air ride switches, and a 10" sub in the back. This was my second fiberglass project. Its painted to match the color of my truck. I've still got to make a bezel to go around the shifter boot to finish it off.




  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    637

    Default

    very nice. Is it made out of wood then fiberglassed over?

  3. #3

    Default Console

    Very nice indeed, and second attempt, well done, would like to do something like this for my Hilux, what are the steps involved, as asked fibreglassed over wood etc, an excellent finish as well.
    Cheers
    Waz from Oz

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    3,382

    Default really nice job...

    [QUOTE=SouthernMudSlinger]I decided to make a center console for my truck. I made it to hold 3 gauges, my air ride switches, and a 10" sub in the back. This was my second fiberglass project. Its painted to match the color of my truck. I've still got to make a bezel to go around the shifter boot to finish it off.
    Been following your attempts with this truck for the past year. You did a super job on that console. Surely is one of a kind. The things looks perfect. Did you build a frame first?
    Keep up the good work. Really like the color too. Henry

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    NORTH JUAREZ
    Posts
    1,958

    Smile oh,

    Hell yea,that thing looks pretty tight,
    some pics of the bottom would be cool to..

    More details!!!
    Phil v is my hero.

  6. #6

    Default

    I didn't take many pics but I did make two side pieces with mdf for the shape I wanted and attached them together inside, and then stretched basically old t shirts over the top and stapled it down. For the guage pods, I had an old guage pod laying around, so I trimed it down, and then made two molds from the inside out of body filler. I found out that fiberglass resin will pretty much form a permanent bond with mdf so I just roughed up the mdf and started fiberglassing. I used evercoat fiberglass resin and reduced the amount of hardner added for extra work time, otherwise, it will start to jell up before you're finished with it if you have a large peice like mine.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    27,740

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SouthernMudSlinger
    I didn't take many pics but I did make two side pieces with mdf for the shape I wanted and attached them together inside, and then stretched basically old t shirts over the top and stapled it down. For the guage pods, I had an old guage pod laying around, so I trimed it down, and then made two molds from the inside out of body filler. I found out that fiberglass resin will pretty much form a permanent bond with mdf so I just roughed up the mdf and started fiberglassing. I used evercoat fiberglass resin and reduced the amount of hardner added for extra work time, otherwise, it will start to jell up before you're finished with it if you have a large peice like mine.
    For the limited amount of fiberglass parts that I designed and built I used foam board as my initial base. I went with the only materials I knew and that was from stealing ideas from surfboard construction. I built a front spoiler for the front end of a Porsche that went on to win a big show Philly and became the center piece of a welcome display at the Atlantic City Classic Car Show several years ago. This spoiler was part of several other custom features on the same car.

    With foam you need to make sure you use foam that the resin won't melt. That little fact ended up costing me a couple days work.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    3,382

    Default big question...

    Quote Originally Posted by Len
    For the limited amount of fiberglass parts that I designed and built I used foam board as my initial base. I went with the only materials I knew and that was from stealing ideas from surfboard construction. I built a front spoiler for the front end of a Porsche that went on to win a big show Philly and became the center piece of a welcome display at the Atlantic City Classic Car Show several years ago. This spoiler was part of several other custom features on the same car.

    With foam you need to make sure you use foam that the resin won't melt. That little fact ended up costing me a couple days work.
    Nice job but looks scary from the standpoint of being ripped off by the wind. How could you attach such a piece that is aimed directly into the wind without it coming off or breaking? Thanks. Henry

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    louisville ky
    Posts
    243

    Default

    very nice work , I've been thinking of removing my factory center console and making something like that in my ford truck

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    27,740

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Henry
    Nice job but looks scary from the standpoint of being ripped off by the wind. How could you attach such a piece that is aimed directly into the wind without it coming off or breaking? Thanks. Henry
    The reason for the wing, in the first place, was to help the Porsche stay on the ground at high speed. The Porsche design is similar to a VW Beetle in that it is wing shaped from front to back and this pulls the car off the road at high speed. The whale tale on the back holds the back down but the front tends to lift off the road at speeds over 120 MPH. An air dam under the front bumper helps but the air passing over the hood, windshield and roof exert quite a bit of upward pull so the wing helps "spoil" the flow of air.

    The fear about the wing coming off and going through the windshield is greatly lessened by the fact that it has very little wind resistance. The air passes under the wing which is attached to the hood using two legs that are bolted through reinforced holes in the hood. The ends of the wing sit on felt dots on the fenders and actually pushes down slightly as air passes over it. The wing has a slight up flip to the back edge that helps spoil the air flow over the car. The owner said that it was a great help at high speed.

    I tried to get it back to make a mold so that I could reproduce it easily but the owner wanted to be the only one to have this item on his car.


  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Fort Worth, TX
    Posts
    75

    Default

    It turned out very, very nice! :cool:

    I'd like to see fabrication pics on how you went about building it and with what materials etc.
    http://i18.photobucket.com/albums/b1...mallsigpic.jpg

    2001 Convertible Corvette, a work in progress.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Hogansburg NY
    Posts
    121

    Default

    Nice job, well executed!

  13. #13
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Arkansas
    Posts
    26

    Default

    wow that looks really great. i tried to do a custom fiberglass sub box, which didnt turn out good at all. i took out my middle seat in my truck and am wanting a custom console as well, i dont think im ready to try fiberglass again quite yet.

  14. #14

    Default


    Quote Originally Posted by Len
    For the limited amount of fiberglass parts that I designed and built I used foam board as my initial base. I went with the only materials I knew and that was from stealing ideas from surfboard construction. I built a front spoiler for the front end of a Porsche that went on to win a big show Philly and became the center piece of a welcome display at the Atlantic City Classic Car Show several years ago. This spoiler was part of several other custom features on the same car.

    With foam you need to make sure you use foam that the resin won't melt. That little fact ended up costing me a couple days work.
    Len,
    Funny you say that. I have had the same issues with foam. What foam did you use doesn't melt?

    Itís funny how people use different directions to end at the same result. To make that piece for the Porsche, I would have made the shape by stretching fleece between 4 (more or less) pieces of shaped wood, then resined the fleece for shape then mat, etc.

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