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Thread: Using a Cheese Grater

  1. #31
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    17

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    if bodyman uses this tool, does it mean that his/her body work isn't flat/uniform but rather piling up a chunk of bondo to cover the lows?

  2. #32

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    I think their the cats azz. I have been using them all my life whenever i do filler work. Build it high, shave it down at the right time and skim coat and block. I dont know what id do without them. The gouges will be filled with the next coat of filler. Its how i was showed how to do filler work and thought everyone used it. Maybe it would hurt your fingers if you have girly hands.

  3. #33
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    40,150

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    Quote Originally Posted by Trey T View Post
    if bodyman uses this tool, does it mean that his/her body work isn't flat/uniform but rather piling up a chunk of bondo to cover the lows?
    Not at all. If a dent is leveled properly there is less filler needed to level the surface and there are several ways to address the filler. You can allow it to fully harden and sand it down with sandpaper or you can shave it down when it get's about as hard as hard cheese using a cheese grater. Shaving off the excess make the first coat of filler level quickly and cleanly so that you have much less effort and less dusty mess.

    Quote Originally Posted by smooth View Post
    I think their the cats azz. I have been using them all my life whenever i do filler work. Build it high, shave it down at the right time and skim coat and block. I dont know what id do without them. The gouges will be filled with the next coat of filler. Its how i was showed how to do filler work and thought everyone used it. Maybe it would hurt your fingers if you have girly hands.
    We actually pile on the first coat, shave it down with the cheese grater then block sand the first coat as it hardens. I usually don't apply filler to my grated filler before sanding it because I feel that the filler grabs the sanded surface a little better. We go from cheese grater to 40 grit to 80 grit to 180 grit from the body filler to the polyester putty.


  4. #34

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    Quote Originally Posted by Len View Post
    Not at all. If a dent is leveled properly there is less filler needed to level the surface and there are several ways to address the filler. You can allow it to fully harden and sand it down with sandpaper or you can shave it down when it get's about as hard as hard cheese using a cheese grater. Shaving off the excess make the first coat of filler level quickly and cleanly so that you have much less effort and less dusty mess.



    We actually pile on the first coat, shave it down with the cheese grater then block sand the first coat as it hardens. I usually don't apply filler to my grated filler before sanding it because I feel that the filler grabs the sanded surface a little better. We go from cheese grater to 40 grit to 80 grit to 180 grit from the body filler to the polyester putty.

    You feel that the filler grabs better to sand scratches better than the grator gouges? :0 And i dont feel the need to finish filler with 180, 120 on a DA is enough imo. the putty should have enough tooth to bite.

  5. #35
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    24

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    Maybe a bit off topic but thought I would throw this in. Over the years I have found that applying filler over anything coarser than 80 grits tends to swell or shrink down the road, unless given lots of time to cure. When I use the grader this is how i do it. Apply filler, cheese grade, then immediately block with 80 and then apply more filler. Some times I will even take it a step further cheese grader, block with 80 then 120 and re-apply filler. I have re-applied filler over 40 grit before and every single time its come back to bite me in the butt, Its just to stinking coarse there is no need imo. When I have a small to medium sized repair like the one above I would not use anything coarser than 100 grit, or maybe even 120.

  6. #36
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    San Francisco bay area California
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    25,766

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    Evercoat has strict guidelines saying nothing coarser than 80 to be used in the repair process just because of this very problem. Some people don't cut that 36 grit down with 80 or they don't press the new filler into the scratches good and the 36 grit scratches "buried" under the next coat of filler comes back to bite them!

    Brian

  7. #37
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    40,150

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    There are a couple of situations that make a coarse scratch show....

    1. Applying filler over a coarse scratch then leveling the new filler before it fully cures causing the new filler to shrink into the scratches. This is a problem in production shops that push the work through too quickly.

    2. When different types of filler are used and tend to expand and contract at different rates. Applying polyester putty over body filler that has 80 scratches in it will almost always show scratches down the road.

    Using a decent polyester primer for your final coat can help stabilize the surface and keep scratches from reappearing if they're not too severe. This type of primer, as well as a good 2k primer, can give you a very hard surface to paint and can keep scratches from reappearing.

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