TheCoatingStore.com

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 37

Thread: Using a Cheese Grater

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    40,152

    Default Using a Cheese Grater

    You can save yourself a lot of time and dust by using a cheese grater blade on that first coat of filler.

    When you apply your filler push that first pass into the scratches then pile it on by spreading layer upon layer until you have more filler on the surface than you need. When the filler hardens it will become like hard cheese for a few minutes and that's the time to whip out the trusty cheese grater blade.

    I like the 10" half round blade because the blade doesn't bend like flat blades and the action is easy to control with no handle. In a few minutes you can have the excess filler removed and the surface semi level without generating a shop full of dust, just a little spaghetti on the floor. After cheese grating allow the filler to harden then block it with some 36 or 40 grit to finish the first coat then apply your second coat. Usually the second coat won't need the grater but it can be used if you feel the surface is too uneven to go with sandpaper. If you use the blade too soon the soft filler will clog the blade and if you allow the filler to get too hard you may as well sand it.

    chsgra.jpg
    Cheese Grater Link

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    744

    Default

    I love the cheese grater...its one of the best tools you can have for filler work. I need to get a new one,, mine is MIA.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    1,334

    Default

    Yes, it is good to shave off the whoopdeedoos of the filler, however you have to be careful not to cut too much, or you'll have deep teeth marks below the surface.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    1,253

    Default

    I kind of like just using 40 grit really lightly. I feel it takes out parafins just as well and as long as you switch out your paper quickly it's a lot better in my opinion. it's better in the sense that it shapes it up better but the dust is the most annoying thing about bondo so you pick your poison. When you shave them off with 40 grit you have to let it cure a little longer than you would if you did it with a file, but dust is still not bad at that point. I want it done in one or two shots so I like just using 40. For the mud on that pic you have I wouldn't have used either. I would have gotten that in one shot, or at least that's how I would have attacked it. No need to aim for two coats on a dent that small. However, I'll give the file another shot. A $2 tool that'll keep the dust down? The wife will even encourage me to get a few.

    A huge factor using either seems to be hitting it at the right curing stage.
    Last edited by showcar; 01-29-2009 at 04:46 PM.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    40,152

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by CoolasIce
    Yes, it is good to shave off the whoopdeedoos of the filler, however you have to be careful not to cut too much, or you'll have deep teeth marks below the surface.
    I don't understand, how do you get deep teeth marks below the surface? Below the surface of what?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    1,253

    Default

    I think he means when you hit it when it's too soft and it gouges deep.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    40,152

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by showcar
    I think he means when you hit it when it's too soft and it gouges deep.
    If you hit it when it's too soft the worst thing that happens is that it clogs the blade, you still have filler to level. If you take too much off then you've got to put more on just like when you sand it too much.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    1,253

    Default

    yeah but maybe he wants to jamb that next coat in. That's kind of why I didn't like the file.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    1,334

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Len
    If you take too much off then you've got to put more on just like when you sand it too much.
    Yes. Ofcourse, but it's easier to leave deep gouges with the cheese grator that you'll have to fill.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    San Francisco bay area California
    Posts
    25,766

    Default

    Personally, I own one, I use it about every two or three years. I honestly see no need to use it what so ever on all the other work. I don't know, I just cut the filler with 80 grit.

    Brian

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    40,152

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MARTINSR
    Personally, I own one, I use it about every two or three years. I honestly see no need to use it what so ever on all the other work. I don't know, I just cut the filler with 80 grit.

    Brian
    I find that the cheese grater eliminates a lot of time and effort that it can take to sand the first coat level. After I grate I block or board the surface with sandpaper to remove the ridges left by the blade. Drag it toward you. It's a quick and clean method of roughing in the filler. It may not be for every job but I use it on about 80% of the first coats of filler. I used to look at it as a "butcher's" tool but after I developed a knack for using them I wouldn't be without them. One other attribute is that they are cheap to use.

    The flat cheese grater blades are a waist for this job but the "half round" works well.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    40,152

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by CoolasIce
    Yes. Ofcourse, but it's easier to leave deep gouges with the cheese grator that you'll have to fill.
    It's just like using an extra coarse sandpaper, you don't leave deep gouges you sand them until they're gone.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    1,320

    Default

    this is one of the most efficent tools in the body shop, considering it costs $2 and saves lots of hourssssss...

    if i have a big job involving large area and lots of body filler, i just order brand new cheese grater.. its new, so its sharper and works faster, plus, its easier to get shape right...

    as for clogging, just put it an container with old lacquer thinner to dissolve the body filler...this way u keep the edges sharp....

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    2,421

    Default

    I have to second that If you use a grater blade correctly it gets the filler right in the ballpark quickly and easily.IMO much more practical and economical than clogging up paper.I look at it as your first step in blocking or roughing in.Mike

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    216

    Default

    Our one bodyman swears by them. I personally find it more efficient to throw some 40 on a file board for my first cut. Just my preference.
    My youtube vid's here

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •