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DonG
03-16-2006, 12:46 PM
I am having some doors dipped. I then plan to apply Picklex. I was going to use a wand to apply it in the areas around the top of the window, but I will not be able to wipe it as directed. Is there any risk to leaving excess pools of Picklex in areas that cant be wiped? Arter the Picklex I plan to apply Zero Rust in the same manner.

Thanks for any advice.

Don

AlexeiVT
03-16-2006, 03:04 PM
After using the wand to apply the Picklex, I'd opt for going over those same relatively inacessible areas w/ compressed air.

Picklex, applied heavily and left on it's own to dry when it settles into pools, would take excessively long to thoroughly evaporate, and when it does, you might be left w/ a bit of a crust on top (not necessarily bad, as the Picklex will still be doing it's job, but for the sake of getting the next material, ZR, adhered as best it can to the surface, make sure the substrate is flat and well dispersed).

Picklex has a consistency similar to water, so not much viscosity. It does it's "chemical thing" in a very short time, i.e. seconds to a few minutes. After that time, shooting it w/ repeated blasts of air will help to disperse it, evaporate it, and aid in leaving a more thin and uniform film thickness (which is pretty thin to do it's job in the first place).

If you have any way to set up a fan or leaf blower, or any means of moving air across and into the surface, that will help...as you'll want the Picklex fully dried before applying anything on top.

The ZR, since that's your intended and last final topcoat...when applied in the same manner, the thicker areas will certainly take longer to dry to any degree of firmness when sprayed heavily and non-uniformly, but that may be a non-issue since it's in a boxed area, and no problem w/ a soft but protective layer in there.

Ideally, a final coating of something like cavity wax seems like it'll provide an additional layer of moisture repellency.

rustyramblers
03-16-2006, 08:40 PM
If you use a gas leaf blower to move air, be aware that a lot of them send the exhaust through the same part the blower tube attaches to. You probably don't what comes out of the engine blowing across anything you're going to paint (especially if you can't get in there to degrease it). Also, if the leaf blower has the ability to act like a vacuum (sucks up and mulches leaves), you'll probably end up spitting leaf bits and mud when you don't want them.

Matt

AlexeiVT
03-17-2006, 12:12 AM
Good point...what I forgot to mention, and probably works as a better directed source of air, would be a vaccum on the reverse mode. I also picked up an ElCheapo PitBull brand electric blower/vacuum (that actually looks like a very miniaturized leaf blower), yet moves a pretty decent amount of air for $10.

Figure if you can get the wand in there to spray in the first place, follow it up by blowing in compressed air (w/ the end nozzle of the wand removed so you get more air flow)...in any case, just be sure to get the Picklex dispersed so that it can fully dry, as when left in a pool it takes quite some time to evaoprate, and what you're left w/ is not the ideal substrate texture.

66ford
04-13-2006, 01:22 PM
cant you just spray water mixed with a healthy amount of baking soda and spray it in there to nuetralize it?