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Mhayes5254
07-28-2007, 12:53 PM
When welding in the rear wheel wells on a van, REMOVE THE INTERIOR.

The seat belt anchors in my old Nissan Quest had rotted out (poor design) and I was patching the area. I knew there was some risk so was using a spray bottle to cool as I went. Bad idea for several reasons.

The car was in the garage (detached), so it could have been a lot worse. Fortunately I am smart enough to always keep a fire extinguisher on hand. Fortunately the local junk yard had several that I could get new interior parts from.

I had posed here a lot on the old board but have not been playing with cars for the last few years. I am starting some projects and may be around a bit more.


768

56Ford
07-28-2007, 05:46 PM
At least you didn't use beer! At a shop I worked at previously one of the guys managed to catch the entire carpet on fire in the car. He welded up a cowl and walked away.
He comes back to see the carpet on fire and pours his beer on it to put out the flame.

Needless to say I didn't work there too much longer.

silentdub
07-29-2007, 01:32 PM
Tip# 17,001.

When welding on the floor, ensure that you remove all of the undercoating, otherwise you will have a BBQ.
I see that VW cars have 10 X undercoating than any other car.


We all learn one way or the other :dunce:

oldtimer
09-09-2007, 07:09 PM
Also, when using stud gun on some Ford T-Birds. I was welding studs to pull a crease on a 1995 T-Bird front 1/4 section, I heard one of the other guys holler over: Hey Larry.... Aren't you going to invite us to your barbeque? What to my surprise, some ding-a-ling engineer stuck a shingle on inside 1/4 for sound deadening. Since I always have interior trim off b4 welding or playing with extreme heat, and always have an extinguisher nearby, a major catastrophe was averted.

JeffsCustomPaint
09-09-2007, 10:29 PM
i weld with a airblower hooked up so if i catch seam sealer or undercoat on fire i quikly blow it out,also a squirt bottle with water is handy when welding
Dry chemical makes a mess and i would only use an extinguisher if it got out of hand,but never had to yet.I always take cation when welding
such as removing interior and using welding blankets and
have my air and water ready after i finish a plug weld or bead.
the worse thing i ever had was a piece of slag falling behind the welding blanket and melted a seatbelt.Now i make sure i remove seatbelts
rather then just cover it up with a welding blanket.

Len
09-09-2007, 10:41 PM
Also, when using stud gun on some Ford T-Birds. I was welding studs to pull a crease on a 1995 T-Bird front 1/4 section, I heard one of the other guys holler over: Hey Larry.... Aren't you going to invite us to your barbeque? What to my surprise, some ding-a-ling engineer stuck a shingle on inside 1/4 for sound deadening. Since I always have interior trim off b4 welding or playing with extreme heat, and always have an extinguisher nearby, a major catastrophe was averted.

If you're causing a flame with your stud welder there's a good chance that you're leaning on the trigger way too long. Usually a stud can be attached with a quick zap that will make the material on the other side of the metal smoke but I usually don't have fire problems. If the stud is attached with a quick zap it can usually be removed (after pulling) using a pair of diagonal cutters between the metal and the stud. It will snap off without the need to cut off the stem of the stud and grind off the head.

Whenever I'm in danger of starting a fire I do what Jeff does, air hose handy and fire extinguisher on the wall.

oldtimer
09-09-2007, 11:16 PM
One time when I was working at a Ford dealership, I got to experience someone else using air hose to blow out a small flame:D. He removed complete interior on new pickup truck ( all except bench seat ) he was replacing roof panel, he had remainder of interior covered with welding blankets ( the good old asbestos ones ) well he was standing in the bed making some welds to the back window area when he smelled extra smoke. Well I watched as he jumped down and grabbed his airhose and proceeded to try to blow out small fire under the seat, he couldn't see that the foam under the seat had started to burn and when he hit it with the air, it blew burning foam everywhere, needless to say extinguisher was too far for him to reach. It seems that he failed to remove a build sheet from under the seat, that is initially what started the fire. And a buncha the other guys helped him to push the truck out the door. The company had to buy the truck back from the customer. Yes I use air and water bottle while mig welding too, but also have CO2 extinguisher right next to me, you really never know exactly what's burning, I learned from other peoples mistakes......:p

JeffsCustomPaint
09-10-2007, 06:16 AM
well i would never leave the seat in when doing a roof
that's just plan dumb.I remove the back seats and all the rear interior
when i do a 1/4 and cover the front but if i was doing a roof
it would all come out but the dash.Now days you bond the roof panels so
there isn't much welding on them, if at all.
the shop has extinguishers but i don't use them unless absolutely
necessary.Dry chemical makes a mess so i keep the water and air handy
but i first remove as much flamable objects before i weld.

oldtimer
09-10-2007, 07:31 AM
Mr. Custom, (don't know yer first name) This all happened in 1984. The worst I have ever done was to blow up a door glass while putting on a door skin on a 1885 Ford Ranger, I had the door on my stand, took everything but the door glass out. So opne of the old timers at the time told me to put a buncha wet rags on the glass and roll it down. I should've known better:( . As I was weld tacking skin on , in recommended areas, A rather large gob of molten wire burned right through the wet rags and scared the hell outta me when the glass blew. Ever since then I even take the glass out of any door skin I am replacing. Lesson learned!;) BTW, it was the same guy who set truck on fire that told me to use wet rags. But, that happened after after I blew up the glass. ....Larry

JeffsCustomPaint
09-10-2007, 10:56 PM
hehe
that guy musta been a few brick shy of a load
needless to say you stopped taking his advice.:scratchch

was this guy like-"yesterday i couldn't spell bodyman,today I are one":dunce:

oldtimer
09-10-2007, 11:32 PM
Actually he played golf with the owner, I believe that is why he could do no wrong. I have been doing body and frame repair for over 41 years, and he was just one of the knuckleheads I've come across:D. Any bodyman who has moved from shop to shop a bit, could write a book on managers, bodymen, painters, porters, mechanics, and owner/operator scams. 'Tis an interesting profession. I am semi-retired involuntarily ( not my choice ) So I filed for S.S.D. I have a belly hernia from laying under back of pickups removing rear step bumpers, then doing a situp with bumper in hands, both knees need to be replaced, and my spine is twisted in two places. Sure hope my state sees it my way. For the last 8 years I have been working in constant pain:(. Time to retire. Trying to figure out what to do with over $80,000.00 worth of tools. My neighborhood is getting bad and eyes are prying everytime I have garage door open, everything is stored in front of our vehicles and toolboxes are covered with tarps. My main toolbox with tools in and on it, weighs about 3 tons:D.