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LukeHot
02-08-2007, 01:56 AM
I got in an accident, and I rolled my truck, I came out of it unharmed, but my 97 ford ranger has some dents on the passenger side of the truck, which it rested on at the end of the wreck.

The truck is 10 years old, and I don't have the money to get a new cab for the thing, but there is a big indentation on the hood, right along where the windshield seals with the frame, and I want to somehow get it so where I can just get a new windshield on it.

http://img373.imageshack.us/img373/8366/dsc02034fx8.jpg

What do you think I should do. Also, how much would you estimate it would cost if I told you to just pound out the dent so where I can put a windshield. I don't want or need perfection, but I don't want to make a huge silicon seal for the poor thing.

88GT
02-08-2007, 08:16 AM
I would try a porto power and block of wood on the floor board and try to push it up, along with a good sised hammer. For a shop/someone with the tools to do it might cost $100 or so

bodymanhelper
02-08-2007, 09:38 AM
I d get a porto power with a block of wood under it. That dent will come out. You still have to shape it with some bodyfiller.

dave_demented
02-08-2007, 11:40 AM
this is what i would do, push up the back lip with a porta power so it is straight. then move to that v channel on the left, the one by that corner and push up underneath with a prta power, while hitting the corresponding ridges down. then just keep moving towards the right until it is all out. you essentialy want to "break" the work hardened areas that are holding the ridges down. remember the metal needs to go somewhere. you want to remove the indirect damage adn then move to the direct damage. if done right, you'll need very little filler, and will stretch the metal very little

hope this helps and glad to hear that your ok!

LukeHot
02-08-2007, 02:43 PM
So with this porta power you are talking about, would I have to come up from underneath the damage. Remove the insulation and interior apholestry and do it that way? Also, I am 18, and I have little to no experience in body work. I know how to take a plunger to a big dent and thats about it.

Thanks for the information anyway.

Phil V
02-08-2007, 04:38 PM
I'm afraid a large suction dent puller won't work in the case of your roll over truck. First thing you need to do is pull the old shattered windshield. Here you can pay someone to pull it or go buy a windshield cold knife (I believe they cost around $25). Call around to the local junk yards a buy a good used windshield ($60 - $80). Next buy a tube of windshield urethane adhesive ($10, comes in a caulking tube, applied with a regular caulking gun).
Once you get the old windshield out use a porto power or whatever you can lay your hands on that will push the front edge of the roof back out to where it belongs. A 4 ton porto power would be your best bet.(cost around $100 for a taiwani one that should work for your needs). You don't need to pull any upholstery and there is no insulation to pull. Place one end of the porto power on a block of wood (to spread out the pressure so you don't put a dent in the floor. Set the bottom of the porto power on the floor and wood in front of the seat I also agree that the damage wasn't from straight downward pressure so straight upward pressue is not going to do what you want. You will have to push at an angle from near the transmission tunnel/floor to the right corner of the windshiled frame/roof (the exact opposite is how the roof got pushed in so you need to reverse that process).
Keep playing with the porto power pushing the roof around until it looks close then test fit your new windshield. the gap between the new windshield and bent part of the roof shouldn't be any more than around an 1/8 of an inch. When you get the roof that close then you're ready to install the replacement windshield.

The way I see it you have 3 choices - (1)repair it yourself for around $200 - $250. or (2) Pay a shop around $600 to just rough in the roof and install a used windshield, would NOT include any filler work or paint work) or (3) send the truck to the junk yard with the following lessons learned - buy collision insurance or don't roll the next truck.

damnfingers
02-09-2007, 10:53 AM
can't he use a bottle jack? Should be able to generate the same amount of pressure at a heck of a lot less cost.

Phil V
02-09-2007, 12:05 PM
A bottle jack would work with the right spacers to go from the floor of the truck to the roof front. A tree limb and a $14.00 cable come-along would also work if used creatively.

The bottom line is if the 18 year old kid who rolled the truck has no collision insurance, no money to pay someone to repair it and he's not willing or capable of repairing it himself then he's screwed, just like the rest of us would be under the same circumstances.

damnfingers
02-09-2007, 02:54 PM
Phil, I wasn't trying to be smart...just suggesting another alternative for someone broke, no insurance, etc.

When I first started reading the thread and saw porta power, it was that that stuck in my mind as the way to do it - it wasn't until I put myself in the place of a broke kid wondering how I was going to afford a porta power that I started thinking of possible cheap alternatives that he could use.

Len
02-09-2007, 03:27 PM
My guess is that you could probably RENT some type of jack to push out the damage. At least it would be less expensive than purchasing one for a single job.

Phil V
02-09-2007, 04:21 PM
damnfingers, I didn't take your post as anything but trying to be helpful to the kid. I was also serious about a tree limb and a cable comealong. The bottle jack or the comealong would work if he took his time and kept dry fitting the new windshield. Many years ago I used a cable comealong anchored to a telephone pole or trees to pull a radiator support and do other pulls. Its not exactly an ideal situation and it sure is low tech but with a little imagination it will work in a case like his roof.

88GT
02-10-2007, 12:40 PM
damnfingers, I didn't take your post as anything but trying to be helpful to the kid. I was also serious about a tree limb and a cable comealong. The bottle jack or the comealong would work if he took his time and kept dry fitting the new windshield. Many years ago I used a cable comealong anchored to a telephone pole or trees to pull a radiator support and do other pulls. Its not exactly an ideal situation and it sure is low tech but with a little imagination it will work in a case like his roof.
I've done such repairs too. Not ideal, but you need an imagination. Pushing and pulling will get it out with enough effort. Ans since it doesnt need to be cosmeticly great, it should be very doable. I did a similar repair on an A pillar. I couldnt figure out how to push and pull with enough force, so I cut the damaged section out, dollied it all back in shape and welded back in. No paint, just a fitting windshield. Took about 3 hours once I came up with a doable solution. Not a great fix, but the customer agreed to it, and the glass fit great