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tr6oldtimer
10-24-2006, 01:28 PM
Replacement parts for a 73 TR6 are not as sharp as the original panels. The attachment shows a replacement sill and the original. While I have done some dolly and hammer work I am unsure how to tackle this project. I will appreciate any advice on how to approach flattening the left (white arrows) slight dome and sharpen the edge (green arrows) to match the original right sill.

Thanks

dave_demented
10-24-2006, 08:56 PM
im honestly not sure about this, but i would probably just weld them in accorss the part that has the right curvature, then bend it as best as you can by hand, maybe with a porta power or somethin, and get it as close as you can. as long as its matching on both sides, and flows with the rest of the body you shouldnt have any sorta problem. this is just my opinion though, please wait for someone elses befor eyou try anything

Len
10-24-2006, 09:09 PM
Replacement parts for a 73 TR6 are not as sharp as the original panels. The attachment shows a replacement sill and the original. While I have done some dolly and hammer work I am unsure how to tackle this project. I will appreciate any advice on how to approach flattening the left (white arrows) slight dome and sharpen the edge (green arrows) to match the original right sill.

Thanks

Yep, that's typical of "aftermarket" sheet metal. If OEM parts were available and purchased you probably wouldn't have this problem.

The trick with doing almost any auto body repair or painting is to make the car LOOK like it was not damaged and I'd say that the best you could do with most aftermarket parts is to blend them into the surrounding shapes. This is done by doing as much new metal reshaping as possible then install the panel and modify the shape of the surrounding sheet metal to disguise the differences. The discreet use of fillers is a big help in this type of effort.

68-chevyman
10-24-2006, 09:29 PM
We have a problem. Can we fix it? Sure. The first thing to ask yourself is why do I have a prob. with a new part?
Sheatmetal has a, for lack of the right word, kind of "grain" to it, what I mean by that is that it will bend and stay folded one way and bend and spring back more the other way. This is called spring tension. It is not a flaw in the manufacturing of sheet steel. It is actualy intended to be that way for strength. The pannel in question should have had the "grain" running lengthwise with the pannel when it was stamped. It looks like the grain was running up and down on the pannel when it was stamped and sprung back from lack of enough compound curviture.

The first thing to do is remove some of the spring in the sharp bend. You do this by slowly heating the green arrow bend from one end to the other. Be careful not to get it to hot. Just changing the color of the metal should do the trick. The next thing I would do is score the green arrow bend with some 40 grit sandpaper sanding lengthwise on the green arrow bend inside and out in order to releive surface tension left behind by the torch. Then I would use what I call a crease maker (wide blades chissle, about 3 in or so) to hammer some score marks in the backside of the green arrow bend using a 2x4 for a dolly(or to back it up) Be careful not to make any visible changes in the shape. All we are trying to do
here is promote a place to bend. Then if you can screw or clamp the part on the car and put pressure on the bend by doing so you got it made. Then all you have to do is take a dinging hammer while the part is on the car and slowly and gradualy ding in the white arrow area. Working from one end to the other in srtaight lines. Be careful and dont hit it to hard at this point. Just enough to move a very small area at a time. Use good lighting, and good luck.

Phil V
10-25-2006, 12:37 AM
Tr6oldtimer, The quickest, easiest way to tighten up the bodylines in your parts is to use a hammer and dolly, cold. Picture a 90 degree angle with the center of that angle too rounded. butt the dolly up to the edge on one side of that angle and tap lightly to medium strength with a body hammer on the rounded edge of that 90 degree angle. Hammer and dolly should just about meet. work the metal on both sides of the angle until your line sharpens up. If you hammer too hard it will put dents in metal that will most likely need a little filler work.

tr6oldtimer
10-25-2006, 05:52 PM
Thanks guys for the feedback. I practiced sharpening edges on an old piece as Phil suggested with good results, I also applied with success Chevy man's technique on how bend the lower edge into proper alignment.

A chuckle on the use of OEM parts. These panels are made by British Heritage in England using OEM dies. Unfortunately they wore out a couple of decades ago.