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View Full Version : inline sanders... are they an invaluable tool?



slipchuck
10-03-2006, 11:12 PM
hi again

I was looking at the possible purchase of a long dual piston inline air sander and was wondering how good of a job they do as far as getting a surface flat, and do they save a lot of time to justify there price (considering a low budget like mine)

do they make some that run at 4 cfm?

so they have the same "action" as a regular 1/2 sheet sander?

thanks

randy

Len
10-04-2006, 12:31 AM
I use one when I have a large job. They are good for roughing in the filler but you still need to finish the job with a hand board.

ZRX61
10-04-2006, 01:29 AM
I swapped out the base of mine for one that takes the sticky paper from a roll :)

Shreck
10-05-2006, 07:57 PM
If you have a Princess Auto near by you can pick them up pretty cheap. I think I paid about $60.00 including 3 packs of refills

bondobaby
10-06-2006, 02:20 AM
To the last guy..Princess Auto rules doesn't it..although the Powerfist brand inline doesn't have a very long life(cheap price though) and the cfm consumption is very high.I work in a body shop and I use my Hutchins inline almost every day but big $$$ to buy if u don't need it much.To a part timer a normal long board works just fine and easier to control the pressure you apply to the panel while sanding :)

CoolasIce
10-06-2006, 04:49 PM
http://www.hutchinsmfg.com/images/2000.jpg
I use my Hutchins inline almost every day
I've never used the Hutchins Hustler 2000. I use the other type of cheapie sander. The Hutchins looks like some serious heavy duty machinery!

Shreck
10-06-2006, 11:49 PM
To the last guy..Princess Auto rules doesn't it..although the Powerfist brand inline doesn't have a very long life(cheap price though) and the cfm consumption is very high.I work in a body shop and I use my Hutchins inline almost every day but big $$$ to buy if u don't need it much.To a part timer a normal long board works just fine and easier to control the pressure you apply to the panel while sanding :)

I totally agree with you, It would not be my first choice. It gulps the air thats for sure. But like you say the price is right. If I was doing a lot of serious sanding I would be looking for a quality sander. For me I already had the block and want to see if the air tool was worth the extra expence.

BTW they are great for stripping paint off doors too. (Wooden) :D

Phil V
10-06-2006, 11:59 PM
The Hutching Hustler inline air file is a tall air tool which means its top heavy and a pain to handle. It wants to keep flopping over on its side. I've used the Atcoa-Viking inline air file for 30+ years and still own a several right now. I have one for 40 grit paper and another one for 80 grit paper and I have the shorter Viking air file called the "Mini-Vike" which is a very handy excellent flat sander for areas that the regular air file is a little too large for. Hutching does make an excellent top of the line ORBITAL air file for finish sanding and guidecoat block sanding.

Len
10-07-2006, 12:37 AM
I agree Phil, the Hutchins is top heavy and tends to tip side to side easily especially when filing on the side of the car. I also find that this short stroke makes the process take much longer than other files. One good thing about the Hutchins is that it's a little quieter.

bondobaby
10-07-2006, 01:50 AM
I guess it all boils down to what your used to. I have tried many other brands and I always go back to my hutchins 2000. It's the most reliable best built one I have. I don't actually hold it by the handle though, I hold it down lower. It just feels better in the hands to sand that way and it eliminates the top heavyness. I put one hand under the front handle and the other at the back and push my fingers up to activate the trigger and hold the handle with my thumb only. It seems to work great for me and I love it but I'm always up to try new things.I used to swear by my hutchins d/a orbital palm sander too until I bought one of those Snap-on mini palm sanders,now it's all I use..lol:)

vipond
10-07-2006, 10:55 PM
Speaking of the hustler being top heaVY i HAVE A HUTCHINS ORBITAL BOARD THat Phil V. suggested I buy about 5 yearsa a go I found it to be top heavby too. So I took that funky little blue handle off ad took a piece of 5/16 bolt stock and bent an L in it leaving 3' out from tool and 3" of handle put a jam nut on bolt and screwed into sander. Now I can set handle where most comfortable tighen jam nut try it you,ll like it hth Vipond

drizler
10-18-2006, 06:37 PM
You can get a decent Ingersol at Lowes for around 100. I can do more work with that in 5 minutes than a hand sander and a 6 pack in an hour. Best off I can still open and close my hand without the carpal tunnel blues. Generally the Ingersols seem to use less air and have more power than the oriental stuff, especially air wrenches. I have a couple big air wreches that speak chinese. Thats why I now get Ingersol, want em?

Henry
10-29-2006, 02:51 AM
hi again

I was looking at the possible purchase of a long dual piston inline air sander and was wondering how good of a job they do as far as getting a surface flat, and do they save a lot of time to justify there price (considering a low budget like mine)

do they make some that run at 4 cfm?

so they have the same "action" as a regular 1/2 sheet sander?

thanks

randy
is an older name in air boards but they work very well and seem to not be too air hungry. I have about three of them and love them.

88GT
12-19-2006, 09:00 PM
I dont find that an air file saves me any time sanding. A long board with nice sharp paper and long strokes takes the filler down just as fast. I do like them for rocker panels though, since you are normally in an awkward position.

dobb
01-20-2010, 11:40 PM
I don't find any advantage in using an inline airboard . They are extremely noisey and because they require so much air pressure the exhaust spreads dust through the entire shop . Why do so many body tech's use these invasive , hi impacked machines ? There are so many much better ways to get the same results . Thanks Keith .

Len
01-20-2010, 11:49 PM
I don't find any advantage in using an inline airboard . They are extremely noisey and because they require so much air pressure the exhaust spreads dust through the entire shop . Why do so many body tech's use these invasive , hi impacked machines ? There are so many much better ways to get the same results . Thanks Keith .

Many professionals will do filler work all day every day and having a machine to help with the physical labor can make a big difference in labor time and effort. Personally I prefer the National Detroit ND900 but the straight line sander will still take a lot of the work out of leveling filler.


http://autobodystore.net/Merchant2/graphics/00000001/ND900.jpg
ND900 Link (http://autobodystore.net/Merchant2/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Product_Code=ND900&Category_Code=TFSL)

baubau
01-21-2010, 01:20 AM
i do own Rodac inline orbital sander and i use it on bigger jobs...its a good machine, it is kind of heavy, air consumption is not too high and it is kind of quiet.....it is a good buy and it lasts a long time..

Mud Hog, 8 inch orbital sander is maybe better way to go...

still, i am quicker for 80% of jobs with only cheese grater, some long flat sanding board and some stick on 40 grit paper and 6 inch DA sander with 3/8 throw for quick leveling than with any long, heavy sanding machine....

tech69
01-21-2010, 02:39 AM
I find straightlines to be incredibly valuable. It saves a lot of time. You just need the shoe that allows stick on paper. Doing clip on will save you money on paper but it will slide around and not cut and break so you'll end up paying the same for paper and be frustrated cause it's not cutting, taking longer, and new paper is breaking. Phil had a good suggestion. One for 40 and one for 80. That works well especially with norton long board paper. It lasts forever and you'd hate to peel off a good sheet of 40 just to throw it away to put on 80. I love my inline and if you know how to do bodywork good learning how to use it will come really easy for you. So in terms of getting it flat it does that perfectly. Some people would say it's cheating or the work won't come out as good but that's nonsense cause my hand is the final say and I always block by hand at a certain point. Saves time, money, and sore shoulders.

My tool of choice is the viking100. It runs on low air consumption but does run a tad more rougher than the IR my friend has, but mine is still not broken in and I tend to go to lots of places that already have them so I keep mine new. :D

another2centsworth
01-21-2010, 11:28 AM
The Hutching Hustler inline air file is a tall air tool which means its top heavy and a pain to handle. It wants to keep flopping over on its side. I've used the Atcoa-Viking inline air file for 30+ years and still own a several right now. I have one for 40 grit paper and another one for 80 grit paper and I have the shorter Viking air file called the "Mini-Vike" which is a very handy excellent flat sander for areas that the regular air file is a little too large for. Hutching does make an excellent top of the line ORBITAL air file for finish sanding and guidecoat block sanding.
Wonder what the cfms are respectively for these viking sanders?

tech69
01-21-2010, 01:09 PM
mine runs on 15 gallon 1.8 hp compressor!!!! To give you an idea, it takes much less air than my mac airhog and even my da with a handle.