PDA

View Full Version : clearcoat dry times before buffing


TheCoatingStore.com

ry57pont
01-12-2017, 06:32 AM
Good morning, after spraying concept 2021 other than a little peel, the clear looks ultra glossy. after cutting and buffing (wizards mystic, foam pad on a DA) i still cant get the original gloss back (like after it was just shot). the clear is 3 weeks old now, do you need to wait longer for the clear to buff to that "just been sprayed" gloss?

Len
01-12-2017, 06:41 AM
Good morning, after spraying concept 2021 other than a little peel, the clear looks ultra glossy. after cutting and buffing (wizards mystic, foam pad on a DA) i still cant get the original gloss back (like after it was just shot). the clear is 3 weeks old now, do you need to wait longer for the clear to buff to that "just been sprayed" gloss?

No, it should be plenty hard by now if mixed properly and the temperature has been around 60 degrees F for a couple days after spraying.

Did you sand the clear and if you did what grit did you use? Using a DA for polishing is not a good tool for the initial polishing, you should use a rotary polisher. The DA will take forever to get a good gloss back.


http://autobodystore.net/Merchant2/graphics/00000001/atd10511b.jpg (http://autobodystore.net/Merchant2/merchant.mvc?Screen=CTGY&Store_Code=ABS&Category_Code=T2)

ry57pont
01-12-2017, 06:46 AM
yes i initally cut with 800, 100,1200,1500 then went to trizac 3000, 5000. after that used a woll pad on my big makita, then a foam pad on my big makita, then the DA. as far as clarity, its real good just dosent have the new spray shine like the other parts that i have not cut/buffed yet. i did pick up some mystic polish last night and will try that. one thing i noticed is that my big makita buffer only goes down to 1500 RPM, maybe that is too fast for the final, but i thought my DA would do a better job on the last step.

Robert
01-17-2017, 11:49 AM
As the clear gets older it'll continue to get harder. As it gets harder, it'll be harder to cut but it will shine more easily. That's because all abrasives have a tendency to mar the surface somewhat and as the paint gets harder it doesn't mar as easily.

My normal procedure for cutting and polishing is this: I start with whatever grit the painter tells me he wants - the sharper the paper and harder the block the less orange peel there will be and the better the distinctness of image. If you want a lacquer flat job you'll probably have to start with 800 grit paper and you're going to lose a good deal of your UV protection. That's very rare, but does happen. Boarders Mustangs starts with 600 and enough clear to sacrifice to make it doable. I don't recommend starting that low. Wherever you start, be sure to cut down to the bottom of your previous cuts with each succeeding grit. If you cut down to 2500 then polishing should be very easy and safer because you don't have to work so hard to get the paper scratches out.

When it comes to buffing and polishing, I use a wool pad for my first cut, that takes care of the sandpaper scratches but leaves a swirl. I follow that with a makita BO6050J sander that I've modified to reduce vibration and vent better. That machine, like the Makita BO6040 - which doesn't require mods - has forced rotation with an elliptical movement and cuts swirls like magic. On this step, I use a foam pad - the orange one. If you're using a normal random orbital, you can get the same result it will just take longer.

Here's what I look for in each polishing step.

When I'm making my initial pass with the wool pad and on the rotary I'm looking for sandpaper scratch - sometimes that just looks like a dull spot. I wipe off as I go and check using an LED light - I like working in the darkest place I can find so I can avoid indirect light and see exactly what's going on.

Then, when I've got the sandpaper scratch removed, I use the same polish I cut with to remove the swirl marks. Menzerna 400, Wizards UCC, and a couple more are all in the same zip code. For the purposes of this discussion, let's say you're using Wizard's. Put enough product on the pad to get an even but thin distribution of product and start polishing. Work one section at time and stay in that section till the shine really develops through. Then when the product is almost gone, wipe it off and check your work. Once you're certain what you're doing is in fact, removing all the sandpaper scratch and swirls from the rotary, keep going.

Here's the technique for getting the highest shine possible. When you're polish is just about gone, stop and wipe it off. Then, without using more polish, using just the residue of worn out polish that's on the pad, go over that area again and don't take the residue off. Put your glaze or wax or whatever you're going to finish with right over the top of that last little bit of residue, then wipe it off using a microfiber cloth.

Anyway, that's how I do it.

Robert

ry57pont
01-17-2017, 12:08 PM
that makes sense, it seems no matter what pad, speed i can see the "mar" in the clear (with the right light) almost like the foam is pushing the clear around. i will give it a final buff after this winter is over and see if i can get the brilliant shine like its just been sprayed. thanks for the info!! - Ryan