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Len
11-15-2016, 06:08 PM
Here in NJ electric charging stations are being installed in state highway gas stations but other variables come into play. The range of most electric cars is around 100 miles or less and in cold weather (20 F) they lose and average of 57% of their range. There are some innovations that help increase this range but it's not available on all models. So if you are looking at purchasing an electric car be sure to check out it's range under all conditions.

tommie.b
11-16-2016, 06:36 AM
Good info Len Wonder why 57% ? on avg.

Phil V
11-16-2016, 12:15 PM
The optimal ambient temperature for an EV best range is 75 deg.f. When the temperatures go down as Len pointed out the range significantly goes down. The same can be said when temperatures go above 75 deg.F. When the outside temperatures get into the 90's deg.f. the range can drop by 33% to 40%. So if you live in Hawaii where the average temp is 75 Deg.F. then you're good to go. Here is Michigan it gets well below zero at times in the winter months and can top 100 in the summer months. I remember as a kid in the U.P. of Michigan waiting for the school bus one morning and the temperature was -34 deg (not wind chill, straight 34 below zero) That is out of the ordinary but -10 to -15 below zero is common.
I remember out cutting wood for my woodstove in the 1980's here in S. Michigan with a -50 wind chill (50 below zero wind chill). I had to use a knitted scarf around my mouth and nose to keep the cold air from damaging my lungs. You don't stand in one spot very long in those low temperatures.

Len
11-16-2016, 02:36 PM
Some of the electric cars have warming capability which increases their range, that's why you need to educate yourself before you invest in one.

Phil V
11-17-2016, 05:13 PM
Some of the electric cars have warming capability which increases their range, that's why you need to educate yourself before you invest in one.

Just out of curiosity- If the vehicle is electric and it has a warming capability for longer range then isn't the logical conclusion that warming capability/heater would use electricity needed to get longer range ? In other words the heater would rob electricity needed to get better range.

Len
11-17-2016, 05:52 PM
Just out of curiosity- If the vehicle is electric and it has a warming capability for longer range then isn't the logical conclusion that warming capability/heater would use electricity needed to get longer range ? In other words the heater would rob electricity needed to get better range.

Exactly and that's why some research needs to be done prior to purchase. LINK (https://content.sierraclub.org/evguide/)

bmarler
11-18-2016, 11:46 AM
Exactly and that's why some research needs to be done prior to purchase. LINK (https://content.sierraclub.org/evguide/)

i have a friend with the tesla model s. i've driven this thing a few times and it's pretty impressive. he tells me that while the car is still plugged in at home it will ready itself for driving by getting things up to temp before you unplug. obviously that adds to the range of the battery pack. he drives all up and down i-5 (living in washington state). i think if you're going to go electric you need to completely adopt the concept. it requires a lot more planning of how to use the range and where you can charge. tesla has the best range and technology so far, but others will come along. i think electric is here to stay. a friend in my car club from germany says that certain cities will ban the sale of gas powered cars in their cities in the coming years. interesting to see how it will go here...