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raj4851
09-02-2006, 10:53 PM
Hi guys, I'm new to the forum and already appreciate the vast information the site offers. I have a chance to buy a Century mig welder. The guy thought it was a 130 model but it wasn't at his location. I also don't know a price yet. I am working on a '39 Ford tudor sedan and need it for sheetmetal work. Any advice appreciated very much. Thanks, Rod

TimG
09-03-2006, 12:07 AM
Make sure it has a gas hookup,and the wire isn't live all the time{trigger only controls wire feed,but wire is always hot}
Mech. shop next to work has a Century mig,not sure what model,real POS.

Phil V
09-03-2006, 12:22 AM
I have had a Century 170 amp mig welder for the last eight years and it has been an excellent welder. I had a chance to pick up a Miller 120 amp mig a short while back and to tell you the truth I liked the way my Century welds better than the Miller. Century has been in business since 1939 and their welders are sold under several different names like, Solar, Sear Craftsman, Snap On etc etc. Just keep in mind that a 220v welder is better than a 110v and the higher the amperage rating of the welder - the better.

dave_demented
09-03-2006, 06:12 AM
i was taught how to weld on a solar, and i absolutely love it. figured id give my opinion

Wayne
09-05-2006, 04:29 PM
I'm a hobbiest with a 110v Century welder. Don't know the model number and I think it's 120 amp. I have no complaints. The thing I like best is the infinite heat range settings, you can really dial it in.

Wayne

juiceman39
09-17-2006, 01:54 AM
I also have a Century Welder 160 amp 220 volt, sold by Snap-On originally. Its probably 20 years old and still kickin quite well. It just needs to find a good operator. I'm still looking for that elusive chart that everyone says to refer to under the cover (for the heat and speed settings-mine didnt come with one)

pebbles
09-17-2006, 07:03 AM
As you experiment around and weld different thicknesses, create your our chart by writing down wire feed and heat as to metal thickness.