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Henry
01-24-2016, 03:19 PM
No, he's not ROBERT but he seems good. Check it out:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Pi1VYYTAUM#t=121.222607

Notice, he only sanded with 1600 grit AND he used Meguiars Carnuba wax over the fresh paint after color sanding.

I'm OK with the 1600 but would not wax the fresh paint nor would I wax where he did.

Otherwise, he knows his stuff.

Henry

NOTE: He used a small square of tungsten steel to remove a couple pieces of dust. What's that all about?????

Henry
01-24-2016, 03:57 PM
On this one, watch him at 1 minute mark, denib 3 spots with the TUNGSTEN square inch block:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ytINDktYERA

I will have to try that. Oh, on a scrap fender.

Henry

xtremekustomz
01-26-2016, 06:10 PM
No, he's not ROBERT but he seems good. Check it out:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Pi1VYYTAUM#t=121.222607

Notice, he only sanded with 1600 grit AND he used Meguiars Carnuba wax over the fresh paint after color sanding.

I'm OK with the 1600 but would not wax the fresh paint nor would I wax where he did.

Otherwise, he knows his stuff.

Henry

NOTE: He used a small square of tungsten steel to remove a couple pieces of dust. What's that all about?????

Just a few things from my perspective when it came to his video.

1. I would never compound and polish without having a sun gun, extremely bright flashlight, halogens or sunlight to check my progress. Fluorescent and reflected light from outside aren't going to show imperfections like the sun will.
2. Menzerna is known to have some fillers in it so it would really need to be wiped down with an alcohol solution prior to inspection to make sure all imperfections are removed instead of covered up.
3. Meguiars waxes contain fillers and cleaners. It may look great out in the sun until the fillers wash away then sanding scratches will be exposed again. I always make sure the surface is as perfect as I can get it before applying any topcoats. I don't mind waxing over fresh paint but won't use a sealant. A wax still lets the paint breath and outgas. A paint sealant could possibly cause problems. I know Optimum Polymer Technologies Car Wax is fresh paint safe but their paint sealants aren't.

Henry
01-27-2016, 01:24 PM
Been watching him for about 6 months. I don't cut/buff like him but love watching him mask and shoot. [)

Maybe, just maybe, you can explain what this 'tungsten steel' small square he is using to rub against nibs.

Would you do that? If so, I would guess, very gingerly.

Thanks.

Henry

bmarler
01-28-2016, 09:21 AM
his tungsten square looks just like the end of a carbide scraper. these are commonly used my machinists to hand scrape the ways on mills and other machine tools. when you get good at using it you can shave just a couple of tenths of a thou from a flat surface. i use one for removing high spots on aluminum panels on some industrial rf generator parts from damage due to arcing. never thought of using one for paint but i guess it would work ok.

Len
01-28-2016, 10:57 AM
his tungsten square looks just like the end of a carbide scraper. these are commonly used my machinists to hand scrape the ways on mills and other machine tools. when you get good at using it you can shave just a couple of tenths of a thou from a flat surface. i use one for removing high spots on aluminum panels on some industrial rf generator parts from damage due to arcing. never thought of using one for paint but i guess it would work ok.

There are several tools designed for nib and runs. We use a fine Nib File for nibs and a coarse Nib File for runs but you need to be careful when using either file so that you don't scratch the paint.


http://autobodystore.net/Merchant2/graphics/00000001/NibFile.jpg
LINK (http://autobodystore.net/Merchant2/merchant.mvc?Screen=CTGY&Store_Code=ABS&Category_Code=PSH)

Henry
01-29-2016, 10:02 AM
his tungsten square looks just like the end of a carbide scraper. these are commonly used my machinists to hand scrape the ways on mills and other machine tools. when you get good at using it you can shave just a couple of tenths of a thou from a flat surface. i use one for removing high spots on aluminum panels on some industrial rf generator parts from damage due to arcing. never thought of using one for paint but i guess it would work ok.

IF you ever do try it, please report the results for us. Thanks.

Henry

bmarler
01-29-2016, 10:40 AM
i don't know if i have the nerve to try it on anything good, but maybe i'll give it a shot. i usually use the nib files for that.

86camaroman
01-29-2016, 02:27 PM
Ive seen what hes using. Its specifically made for removing runs and dirt nibs. it has rounded corners and wont bite into the surrounding clear coat

86camaroman
01-29-2016, 02:33 PM
http://www.buffdaddy.com/product/S-BLADE# called a mirka shark blade

Henry
01-29-2016, 04:34 PM
http://www.buffdaddy.com/product/S-BLADE# called a mirka shark blade

Thanks for the information. I'm sure Len can get that for us since he deals with Mirka.

Henry

typicalcarguy
01-29-2016, 06:22 PM
You use that tool the same way you would a razor blade like a wood plane and shave the run or nib down.I use razor blades all the time if I have a little issue to fix,I have tried the shark blade before and it works very well,just didn't want to pay the asking price:)

Len
01-30-2016, 10:31 PM
Nib files are a waste of money. I have two.

Break or cut off a piece of a paint paddle for a hard block....

Maybe you just don't have enough experience to use them properly. They sit on my paint bench and I use them when needed with excellent results. When I first started using them I was too aggressive and damaged the paint but with some practice I found them to do an excellent job on nibs and runs. I use the coarse on runs and the fine on nibs. Run the coarse file at an angle over the surface (so the teeth slice and not dig) using a light touch and no pressure and only take off about half of the film you want to remove and allow the exposed paint to harden for another 24 hours THEN block the run. On a nib just hit it lightly with the fine file then switch to a block to level the surface, if you use a block for the start you can dislodge a contaminant and cause a deep scratch in the paint. The biggest problem most people have with Nib Files is the damage they do by being too aggressive, go lightly.